(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pacific Outlook (July-Dec. 1908)"






5' 




" *^ 



1 /, 



2007 DS3Eh31 fl RY * 

California Stale Library f~, -y /\ jl r" 

- 04 , c . L,/i ZOfJ 

Accession No.. \-~kfJj&\.-(. 

Call TVn CyL Ci frl fi^?t | 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SACRAMENTO 

DOES N OT CI RCULATE 

This book is due on the last date stamped 
below.- •B©oks-ma^i].Qi_bj£_renewed. 




Los Angeles. California 



Two Perplexing Words 







r 



y\Jl 



^ A 



Always Elevating 
The Quality... 

Every progress recorded in our business 
marks a higher quality and a lower price. 
We buy more pianos, and we buy at lower 
prices than ever before, because this old 
house is constantly bettering its affiliations. 

We Sell $350 Pianos Now For $196 

We Sell $450 Pianos Now For $295 

We Sell $600 Pianos Now For $337 

We Make Easy Monthly Terms 

mzi»ali f j" |f(mi,f 

113-113* SO SPRING ST itustk ^op' 



.■■^PENT-TRUTHFUL-- 1 ^ ■ 



SINGLE COPY 5 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR $> 2.92 



>\Y>h£ 



SIX PER. CENT ON SAVINGS 



Municipal Collateral Six Per Cent Bonds 



Secured By 

Municipal Improvement Bonds 

And Public Securities Issued by the 

City of Los Angeles 

and 
MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS AND DIVISIONS 

of the 

State of California 

Sold in Denominations of 

$100.00 to $1000.00 Maturing in from Two to Ten Years 

and in Denominations of 

$25.00 to $100.00 Maturing on Six Months' Notice 

All Absolutely Secured by Deposit of 

$115.00 of Public Securities to each $100.00 of Collateral Bonds 

with 

Columbia Grust Company trustee 

311 West Third St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Guarantors anb investment Company. 

404-407 Mason Opera House Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal.' 
Phones: Main 496, A 9240 




Is a- California product — made especially for the 
housewift. It's a cleanser for the home and is 
adapted to use on 

Iron 

Steel 

Brass 

Copper 

Windows 

Woodwork 

and Porcelain Ware 

USE-IT 

TiTc AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE (908 

MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




(Writing in SigHt) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bali-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typeibar bearings are made of 
steel as hard andi as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play anid< without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — .Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St,. Los Angeles, Cal. 



1 41)2 1 7 



M£EBS OT'dlLIMm 




J9 Southwestern Weekly 



C ** r #* Bakor Jrndmrson 
coiron 



H. C. Mckerty 

PRESIOCNT 



Published momry Saturday 
LiMtnwr Build ng. Lorn Jvngwlwm, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price Sl.ooa yoar In advance. Single copy S 
cents on all newM stands. 

Entered uwcondcliii matter April c, 19^7, it the poaloffice at Los Angeles, 
California, under toe act of Congress of March J, 1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Oittlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts 
though be will endeavor to do to if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with tbem 
If »our manuscript i* valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 5. Los Jtngeles, Cat., July 4, I908 Mo, I 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook In mailed to subscriber.* through the 
f,oa Anfrclcs Post Office every Frldny, and should be de- 
livered In every part of the city by Saturday's post. If for 
imy reiiMon It should be delayed, or be delivered In poor 
ii.ndKlun, subMcrlliers will confer n favor upon the publishers 
by Kivlns them immediate notice. 

A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

9 The mischief is much more trifling, the danger 
less, the cure easy, where the wound is manifest. 
jj But the wounds of jealousy are hidden and secret, 
W nor do they admit of the remedy of a healing cure, 

Ssmce they have shut themselves in blind suffering 
within the lurking places of the conscience. Who- 
9 ever you are that are envious or malignant, observe p 
2 how crafty, mischievous and hateful you are to those 5 
you hate. Yet you are the enemy of no one's well- m 
being more than your own ; whoever he is whom you W 

» persecute with jealousy can evade and escape you. 
You cannot escape from yourself; wherever you may 
J be your adversary is with you; your enemy is always 
within your own breast. Your mischief is shut up 
* within you. You are captive under the tyranny of 
Q jealousy. — 'Cyprian, A. D. 250. 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
ALTHOUGH the opinion has been expressed, by 

enthusiastic advocates of the good roads project, 
that the proposed bond issue will carry by a heavy 
majority, this paper is of the opinion that hard 
work will be required to pull them through. Much 
as we have wished for and advocated the construc- 
tion of a fine highway system in Los Angeles coun- 
ty, which might become the nucleus of a system 
radiating throughout all Southern California, we 
believe that a mistake has been made in setting the 
date fur the vote on this question more than three 
months prior to the date of the general election, 
when a new board of supervisors 
Road Bonds shall be chosen. The cart has been 
in Danger put before the horse. In endeavor- 
ing to make it appear than an early 
vote was expedient in order that the highway pro- 
ject might be divorced from local political ques- 



tions, we believe thai an error has been committed; 

for there is no doubf that a considerable number of 

citizens, especially taxpayers, will oppose the bond 
issue on the ground that it will be unwise to settle 

this question until the character of the next board 
of supervisors shall have been definitely determined. 
In our judgment — an opinion based upon inter- 
views with numerous citizens not "on the inside'" — 
the bonds will be defeated unless there should be a 
great revulsion in public sentiment during the next 
four weeks. 

* + * 

THE PRESENT BOARD of supervisors, in re- 
sponse to what they regarded as a powerful public 
sentiment, has adopted a resolution which, on its 
face, would appear to make an honest administra- 
tion of this great fund a reasonable certainty. It 
has named an advisory committee, consisting, for 
the greater part, of men who may be depended upon 
to protect taxpayers, and "this board of supervisors 
pledges itself," in the words of the resolution, "and 
each and every member thereof promises and 
pledges himself to take no action in the matter of 
letting contracts for road improvements, in making 
appointments to positions connected with such road 

improvements, or in filling any 

"This Board's" vacancy that may occur upon the 

Pledge Los Angeles County Highway 

Commission unless the same shall 
first be approved by the said advisory committee." 
This is doubtless as far as the board of supervisors 
could go, under the law; but it is unfortunate, for 
it is hardly far enough to encourage the belief that 
all prospects of "graft" in connection with the work 
of highway improvement arc thereby eliminated. 
"This hoard" may redeem its pledges; but "this 
board" may not be the board that will handle all 
the funds, ami it can hardly pledge the new board, 
to be elected in November, to the policy to which 
it has so quickly and so smoothly assented. The 
new board may be composed of entirely new men, 
the majority of whom will decide to rescind the rosy 
resolution adopted by "this board." So, isn't it bet- 
ter to be safe than to be sorry ? 

* * * 

S( ) FAR as the highway commission is con- 
cerned, as a body it is free from any popular sus- 
picion of sinister motives. If the administration of 
the proposed fund of three and a half million dol- 
lars were to be left in the hands of these men. we 
believe the bonds would be voted by a tremendous 



Pacific Outlook 



majority, for almost with one voice the inhabitants 
of Los Angeles county have been demanding an im- 
proved highway system — a system that would en- 
dure. But experience, that dearest but yet most 
highly qualified teacher, has demonstrated the ab- 
surdity of expecting fidelity to the best interests of 
the whole people from any such official body as the 
existing board of supervisors. The present board 
may not be re-elected, but a board the 
Confidence majority of which is just as prone to 
Lacking "do politics" as the majority in the ex- 
isting body, and possibly more so, may 
be chosen to succeed it. T!he danger is not a myth. 
No such body as that at present administering the 
affairs of Los Angeles county should ibe afforded an 
opportunity to expend any portion of three mil- 
lions of dollars of the county's money to suit its 
own sweet will. We should have waited until after 
the character of the incoming board had been de- 
termined before being asked to vote for the road 
bonds. Though the disappointment over the out- 
come of the election of July 30 may be great, in 
more than one quarter, we believe that the failure 
of the bonds to carry, if there should be such fail- 
ure, will prove a salutary lesson to political jobsters 
and incidentally be the source of some edification to 
a community whose best citizenship may have had 
occasion, in the past, to question its own strength. 



THE PUBLIC should have been prepared for 
the nauseating disclosures following the investiga- 
tion of conditions at the Whittier State Reforma- 
tory. Politics — politics — all is politics ; and this 
explains the scandal which C. C. Desmond of the 
board of trustees is determined to air, regardless of 
all the pressure which has been or may be (brought 
to bear upon him to cause him to abandon his quest 
after the root of the rottenness. The "conservative" 
element in the board would proceed with diplomacy, 
evidently. Perhaps there is a fear that the hitherto 
omnipotent hand of the Southern Pacific machine 
will be brought down with tremen- 
Good Time dous weight in defense of the branch 
to Get Mad of the political "system" whose head- 
quarters is maintained at Whittier. 
But Mr. Desmond, like one Roosevelt, appears de- 
termined to bawl out the truth, raising the windows 
so that all may hear. Well, let him bawl! The 
louder he yells and the more violently he kicks the 
sooner will the people who foot the bills realize that 
they have been nurturing a monster who has his 
claws and his fangs on the helpless bodies of wards 
of the state — children who cannot escape from the 
clutch of bestial undisciplined guardians. This 
monster is political control of this particular state 
institution. Let us rejoice that Mr. Desmond is 
mad clear through. Let us hope that he will stay 
mad until the stinking mess at Whittier is thrown 
out into the sunlight. 



A CELEBRATION unique in the history of the 
Pacific coast will be that which is taking place to- 
day (Saturday) at San Pedro. For the first time 
Independence Day will be celebrated by many 
thousands of Southern Californians as Harbor Day. 
The day is not of local significance only. It is of 
interest to all America, and should be recognized 
as an event of importance to tliQ entire civilized 
world. The starting' point of the trans-Pacific 
yacht race is in waters which in the not very remote 
future will witness the assemlbling of great ocean 
craft from every maritime nation. The harbor 
which now promises to be saved forever from the 
grasp of a selfish railroad corpora- 
A Two-fold tion will become, in the course of 
Significance time, one of the most important 
shipping points in the whole world. 
It will be to western America what New York har- 
bor is to the East, what Liverpool harbor is to 
Great Britain. It is right, fit and meet that on the 
day on which America celebrates its independence 
Southern California, and indeed the entire Pacific 
coast, should celebrate its independence — its libera- 
tion from one species of despotism which, if per- 
mitted to grow, in the course of time would enslave 
the western coast as the colonies were once en- 
slaved by their arrogant master across seas. The 
raising of the Stars and Stripes at San Pedro today 
has a two-fold significance. The occasion is one 
which should be commemorated annually, lest fu- 
ture generations forget the great struggle their fore- 
fathers made to preserve the integrity of one of 
their most important heritages. 
* * + 
LOS ANGELES has one great and rapidly grow- 
ing need to which practically no attention has been 
given by its inhabitants or by those capable of sup- 
plying the demand, so far as we are able to learn. 
We refer to the absence of adequate crosstown 
transportation facilities. The western part of the 
city, with its tens of thousands of inhabitants, a dis- 
trict which is probably more populous, certainly of 
greater area, than any other residential section in 
America not enjoying those facilities to which we 
now desire to draw attention, finds the business sec- 
tion of the city within easy access. But strangely 
enough, in order to travel by car from the north 
part of this district to the south part, or vice versa, 
one is now compelled to ride close to the 
Growing business center of the city and transfer. 
Need at the loss of much time and not infre- 
quently at a double expense. Persons 
residing within a couple of miles of some spot 
north or south of them which they desire to visit 
are now compelled to travel six or eight or ten miles, 
if they desire to make the trip on the electric cars. 
We believe that the railroad companies would find 
that they had made a profitable investment if the}', 
or one of them, would install a service from the 
northerly to the southerly portion of this western 



Pacific Outlook 



re found advisable 
alar trips to a half-hourly schedule For 
a time; and a i line running in the vicinity 

■ Hoover rtainly would 

.1 live in this section. We 

respect full) submit this proposition t" the Los \n- 

- Railway Company for its earnest considera- 

+ + + 

NEW Y< >I\K. Colorado, and now Louisiana have 
n the lead in the abolition of racetrack gam- 
bling. The action of Louisiana doubtless has been 

received with considerable surprise in manyquarters, 
for Louisiana was notorious for a long time as be- 
ing the only state in the Union which permitted a 

great lottery swindle to flourish tinder the sanction 
of its laws. But now, like some of the greatest 
whiskey-producing states which recently have gone 

"dry", or partially so, Louisiana is enjoying that 
species of exhilaration which follows the awaken- 
ing of a conscience long dormant. The Louisiana 
lottery was clean when contrasted with racetrack 
gambling, For it was "straight" — the buyers of lot- 
ters tickets had sonic show for their money. But in 

racetrack robbery the prospective 

The Criminals' victims have no show whatever, 

Last Stand if the plans of the "profession" do 

not miscarry. We have yet to find 
a defender of this particular form of theft outside 
the ranks of those whose "business" would be hurt 
by the enactment of legislation prohibiting it, and 
all argument, therefore, would appear superfluous; 
but it is well to keep the matter in a state of agita- 
tion until the will of the decent people is enforced 
through the medium of their legislature. It will 
be well to bear in mind that, with the closing of the 
courses at Saratoga Springs, Sheepshead Bay, 'New 
Orleans and other places where this form of gam- 
bling recently has been done to death by an enlight- 
ened and righteously enraged people, the very worst 
element which has found its occupation there gone 
will flock to Arcadia and Emeryville at the opening 
of the annual carnival of vice and crime at these 
two places and contribute its full quota to the or- 
ganized menace to the peace and safety of the in- 
habitants. • 

+ + * 

THIS SUBJECT has been threshed out so freely 
in the Los Angeles papers that it would seem to be 
a waste of words to say anything further; but for 
deliverance from this as from other afflictions, 
eternal vigilance is the price that must be paid. Not 
many months since this city passed through a reign 
of crime that appalled even the stoutest hearts. 
The police department confessed its inability to 
cope with the problem presented by the presence of 
hundreds of the most hardened criminals in the 
country. To walk the streets after nightfall was to 



take one's life in his hands. Burglaries, holdups 

and even murders and attempted mur 

Up With ders wrought the people up to that 

the Bars! state which, had a le: n at the 

psychological moment, probabl) would 

have resulted iii the organization of a vigilance 
Committee. Such committees actually were organ- 
ized in some outlying towns. These experiences 

are still l're>h in our in in. Is anil should mow- every 
law- and order-loving citizen to co-operate to tin 

fullest extent with the lAinti-Racetrack Gambling 

League, whose headquarters is in Berkelej and 

whose aim is to secure the enactment of legislation 
abolishing all forms of gambling on the racetracks 
of California. Though slow to shake .iff the shackles 
of corporation control, let the people of great Cali- 
fornia be swift to rid their state forever of the 
vice of racetrack gambling and the terrors it in- 
spires. 

■fr * + 
THE POLICE department of Los Angeles is to 
be complimented on the organization of its "traffic 
squad" and the excellent service rendered by this 
body of officers. The organization of such a squad 
was first suggested by the Pacific Outlook, and it 
has been with genuine interest that this paper has 
noted the truly metropolitan manner in which most 
of the individual officers have learned to perform 
the duties to which they have been assigned. Un- 
fortunately for the service, however, we have no- 
ticed the continuation of the conflict be- 
Street tween the police and the railway employes 
Traffic stationed at certain crossings to expedite 
traffic. This work should be in the hands 
of the police. The street railway companies should 
not be permitted to usurp the functions of the po- 
lice at these or any other spots. With a policeman 
directing traffic in one direction and a railway em- 
ploye directing it in another, as has frequently been 
the case, a ludicrous instance of provincialism in the 
heart of what appears to be metropolitanism pre- 
sents itself — and incidentally traffic is almost at a 
standstill. It is to be hoped that the police depart- 
ment will take, the management of all traffic at 
street intersections into its own hands. 

NOT LONG AGO a "pronouncing match" was 
held in a suburban town. Twenty words were se- 
lected and five members of the women's club and 
five students of the high school were asked to pro- 
nounce them. None had been afforded a glance at 
the list before facing it on the blackboard. Each 
contestant appeared separately. When the judges 
had rendered their decision it was found that 

thirty misses were scored against the 

Can You adults and twelve against the high 

Do It? school pupils. One of the latter — and 

the youngest contestant, at that — was 
the only one who succeeded in pronouncing all the 



Pacific Outlook 



words properly. Here is the list as it appeared, on 
the board : "Impious, ally, deficit, extant, hymeneal, 
gladiolus, pianist, gondola, mausoleum', program, 
formidable, gratis, excursion, casualty, dishevel, 
vaudeville, bronchitis, chastisement, vagary, ap- 
paratus." They look easy, for the greater part — 
but how many readers of the Pacific Outlook can 
pronounce them all without referring to some 
printed authority? 

* * * 

THE CANTALOUPE is once more monarch of 
the breakfast table. The plain old muskmelon ap- 
pears to have entered oblivion. Its place has been 
usurped by the more aristocratic fruit, whose unat- 
tractive exterior hides a loveable heart, sometimes. 
Then, again, the character of the "innards" is not 
always the same. The old-time fruit, the plebeian 
muskmelon, was a more dependable fruit. Best of 
all it was not necessary that we should raise them 
in our own gardens, for our neighbor was sure to 
have them lying about in some corner of his gar- 
den, and they always seemed to mature on moon- 
light nights. The passing of the 
Aristocracy muskmelon was a distinct blow to 
in. Melons those of us whose disposition was of 
a night-roving nature. Unfortunate- 
ly for the predatory specimens of our kind the 
cantaloupe cannot be grown successfully in every 
back yard. We cannot sneak into Rocky Ford or 
the Imperial valley just before retiring and help our- 
selves to two or three of these delicacies, so we have 
to depend upon Wing or Li or Charley and pay the 
price he asks. One may buy Imperial valley canta- 
loupes nowadays for a song — for a grand opera 
stunt, as it were — and they are worth the price. 
Rocky Ford now has to retire from the field as the 
champion cantaloupe territory of the world. Our 
own Imperial country has distanced it, if we are to 
believe what loyal Californians tell us. Perhaps, 
however, we had better not carry our inquiries into 
Colorado. 

* * + 

IN PITTSBURG, Pa., the other day two teams 
representing trust companies engaged in a game of 
base ball for the benefit of a local charity. Two 
men, both prominent, thought it would be a great 
joke and add immensely to the fun of the game if 
they would enact a bit of side-play — "shooting the 

umpire". The umpire himself pro- 

The Fool posed it, and at the moment agreed 

and His Gun upon, after the umpire had made 

what he admitted to be a "rotten" 
decision, his friend pointed a shotgun at him and 
fired point plank. The gun "wasn't loaded" — be- 
fore the shot was fired ; but when horror-stricken 
spectators rushed to the fallen umpire he was found 
to be riddled with buckshot. He died two minutes 
later, and his lifelong friend is crazed by grief. Will 



the fool with the gun that "wasn't loaded" never 
become a thing of the past? 
+ * + 
ANOTHER MINISTER has abandoned his call- 
ing with a severe arraignment of the modern the- 
ology. The Rev. E. Calvert Smoot, formerly pastor 
of a Unitarian church in San Francisco, in bidding 
farewell to his church and the ministry predicted 
the final extinguishment of the Christian 
church by reason of its inability to keep 
pace with the evolution of the world. "The 
church is founded upon a certain set of ideas," 
he declared, "and its ministers are expected to pro- 
mulgate these ideas. When a minister reaches any 
conclusions which are subversive to these he is ex- 
pected to leave the pulpit. This is true of all de- 
nominations." And it should be true. A minister 

occupies the position of employe. He 
But One enters the ministry with the understand- 
Solution ing that he shall teach certain things. 

When he is ordained he practically 
pledges himself to promulgate the' religious ideas 
which his theological seminary has taught him. If, 
after having entered upon his labors, he find his 
mission distasteful, if he find that he cannot con- 
scientiously stand sponsor for the theories and ideals 
which lie at the root of the denomination with which 
he has identified himself voluntarily, the only thing 
left for him' to do, if he is an honest man, is to re- 
tire from the field. Otherwise he would prove him- 
self to be a hypocrite. If his church do not grow 
as rapidly as he and other individual members may 
grow, he is out of his element; retirement is the 
inevitable outcome in the case of a sincere and cour- 
ageous man. Both the church and the man gain 
thereby. 

* + + 

AN AUTHORITY has said that vital as is the 
physical side of conserving youth, its true fountain 
is in our brain. "If we maintain activity of its cells 
it quickens the circulation of the blood, the vital 
organs, gives light to the eyes, preserves the supple- 
ness of the body, removes to a distance illness, age, 
death itself." Body ache, according to this author- 
ity, is often nothing but "brain rust". He quotes 
von Moltke as saying of a fellow-officer: "He looks 
much older than he is ; he has used his body more 
than his mind." One of the most remarkable things 
in the career of Dr. Richard Storrs was that by far 
the greatest portion of that career 
Active Mind: was after he had passed the age of 
Sound Body fifty. The Duke of Marlborough 
began his career as a great com- 
mander when he was fifty-two. On the eve of his 
eighty-ninth birthday Lord Lyndhurst made a bril- 
liant speech in Parliament. Sophocles wrote his 
masterpiece at eighty. Goethe finished "Faust" in 
his eighty-second year. And so, on and on in an al- 
most innumerable array, history furnishes brilliant 



Pacific Outlook 



men and women who have not fallen 
victii they have had the 

keep their physical condition as near- 
ly pi nd others who have suffered 
but slight deterioration of their bodily condition 
kept their minds alert and ani- 
mated. Then truth than poetry is the sug- 
ion found in the old saw. "A sound mind in a 
sound body." It might he altered to read: "An ac- 
tive mind makes a sound body." 
+ ♦ ♦ 

Changing Human Nature 

A favorite idea of certain philosophers and imag- 
inative writers is about to he realized in Southern 
California, if press dispatches have accurately rcp- 
nted the programme of Dr. Leone Landone, 

i, we are assured, "has studied sociology all over 
the world." and who has just purchased a lovely 
rural estate near Los Angeles, where he plan* to 
experiment with human beings as Luther Burbank 
has done with plants, says the New York Tribune. 
meagre reports thus far at hand leave much in 
obscurity, and even arouse a suspicion that either 
the much traveled sociologist or else his chronicler 
- not know whereof he speaks. . Dr. Landone is 
quoted as saying that his methods are parallel to 
Burbank's; hut how tltiey can be we are unable to 
fancy. The "plant wizard'' operates under the 
guidance of the DeVries mutation theory; roughly 
-peaking, he does nothing more than to raise an 
enormous number of plants of a given variety and 
to select therefrom for crossing the few peculiar 
growths wikose characteristics he desires to empha- 
size. Thus, in order to produce a certain curious 
berry more than twenty million vines were thrown 
away. Xow, if Dr. Landone is to emulate Mr. Bur- 
hank he will have to open a boarding house about 
twice as large and populous as New York City, and 
he must wait an aeon or two for the desired results. 

But the next sentence in the report clearly refutes 
the alleged parallelism between Burbank and Lan- 
doneism, for the human nature laboratory is re- 
putedly going to start operations with twelve chil- 
dren. The mystery of the new process deepens as 
we read that the sociologist hopes to reconstruct 
brain cells. As no sane man will try to remodel 
anything whose structure he does not understand 
at least roughly, the natural inference from this 
report is that Dr. Landone has discovered the make- 
up of brain cells. This is startling, inasmuch as 
all prominent physiologists and psychologists freely 
admit that the sum total of scientific research to 
date lhas not proved a fraction as much about the 
finer structure and functional behavior of brain cells 
as Mr. Percival Lowell has demonstrated about 
Martian canals. 

But Dr. Landone's epoch-making discovery and 
his unrevealed laboratory methods do not interest 
us as much as does his ulterior purpose. The so- 
ciologist evidently wants to transform human na- 
ture. This is the arch mystery. Why should hu- 
man nature be revised? And, if it has to be, why 
go off into the country to do the trick? If there is 
one fact on which psychologists, biologists, sociolo- 
gists and political reformers are thoroughly agreed, 
it is that the apparent defects of human nature are 
really due to a badly ordered environment. Theo- 
retically, the grooves of life would be well greased 
if the elements were whipped into obedience so as 



upply all present human wants and prevenl 
evil impulses, or if human wauls and impul 
so toned down that no man could find f.udt with 
things as they are. But our ( alii', rnia genius will 
never bring about either of thesi 

He is not trying to make the real world til 

lie i- planning to raise children among : 
cialities of a sequestered, strangely managed Cali- 
fornia gar. leu. lie may develop a atical 

prodigy, a contortionist, a strong man. a ho\ who 
can wiggle his ears and a girl without .lay dreams; 

but will these laboratory creatures Ik- altogether 
happy, and will they be able to live anywhen i I i 
than on the Landone farm? Whatever miracles tile 
iologisl who has studied on Staten Island, in 
Nova Zemfola and in Tibet may work, we shall still 
believe that human nature, in ils world-wide, unre- 
lenting efforts to prevent disease, oppression and 
poverty in all their form-;, is working out its own 
salvation in the best way. 

* * * 
Pearl Culture in Lower California 

.V Mexican company claims the honor of being the 
pioneer in the industry of cultivating pearls. Un- 
der the old system the industry was an uncertain 
one. I'.uslhels of shells might yield but a few gems 
or possibly none at all. But this company, which 
is working under a concession from the Mexican 
Government, has taken up the cultivation of pearis 
as a practical industry, and is now operating the 
largest pearl farm in the world, employing in the 
harvesting season more than 1,000 people. They 
are operating the Gulf of Lower California. The 
present markets for the company's products are 
Paris, London and Berlin, and Hamburg and Bre- 
men for the mother of pearl, which is exported in 
large quantities. 

Two years are required for the growth of an 
ordinary shell, which forms slowly in layers, like 
an onion. After two years tihe shell loses its gem. 
and, unless opened at the proper time, there is 
nothing of value within. Mr. Vives, who spent 
twenty-five years in studying and experimenting, 
discovered this fact, and thereupon he devised the 
system whereby the shells are cultivated until the 
proper time and then opened. 

In the first place, the shells are gathered in the 
season when the eggs are being deposited. These 
eggs are carefully placed in little artificial dhannels 
like the natural bottom of the sea, care being taken 
in these channels to protect the little "animals" 
from their natural enemies. At the proper stage 
they are transplanted into deeper water, where 
larger boxes continue to protect them. The stock 
is also inspected and the "dead" ones removed and 
replaced by "live" sJhells. In the deeper channels 
the shells are left to develop, and at the end of two 
years the harvest is ready. In the deep-water cages, 
where the pearls develop, the divers can descend 
without risk. 

Three distinct kinds of pearls are produced in the 
California Gulf, the most valuable, black pearls, 
ranging close to $300 per carat gold. The next in 
point of value are the white pearls, about $250 a 
carat, the price varying with the size and perfection 
of the gem. The yellowish pearl, although ranking- 
third in value, is, as a rule, first in favor among the 
feminine admirers because of the brilliancy of the 
gems. These prices are for the rarest and most 
perfect pearls. 



Pacific Outlook 




By the Editor of the Pacific OutlooK 



SINCE Dr. Lummis, director of the public li- 
brary, instituted his campaign for the estab- 
lishment of an official pronunciation of the 
name of our city, my attention has been directed 
by various acquaintances to several other words 
which, though they may be pronounced correctly, as 
a rule, as not infrequently used improperly; to 
others which, though in common use, are derived 
from sources but little known; to others which, 
though they may be properly employed, as a rule, 
and correctly pronounced and spelled, have not beer, 
made the subject of intelligent study and conse- 
quentiy are not always used with discrimination. 

The term "cafeteria", which has been popularized 
by Los Angeles, is one which is commonly mis- 
pronounced, and if the truth were known few per- 
sons would be found who are familiar with its 
origin. It is commonly pronounced with the ac- 
cent on the third syllable. There appears to be no 
authority for such pronunciation, however. The 
word "cafe", from which it is derived, being a com- 
mon French word, and the ending being obviously 
Spanish, some have thought that the word is a 
mongrel, of mixed French and Spanish derivation. 
For the edification of those who have not been able 
to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion in the matter 
let me offer the following from three well-known 
authorities. Dr. Lummis says : 

" 'Cafeteria' is a 'made' word. It is not in any 
. Spanish dictionary that I am aware of — and certain- 
ly in none of standing. But it is reasonably well- 
made in accordance with the usage of Spanish. , No 
Spanish-speaking people have ever had the institu- 
tion — and never will have. until they change their 
minds, for they have none of the 'hurry-up-cheap'. 
The etymology is logical. 'Cafe' is coffee — and we 
get our English word from the Spanish word. It 
is also our 'cafe'. "Cafetera' is a coffee-pot. 'Cafe- 
tero' is a coffee-seller. 'Cafeteria' is etymologically 
a place where coffee is sold. It takes after 'carpen- 
teria', a place where carpentry is done — and many 
similar words. The correct pronunciation- is 'caff- 
e-te-ree-a'." 

The same conclusions- are reached, by a different 
route, by Dr. Edgar von Fingerlin, of the depart- 
ment of French and Italian of the University of 
Southern California. Dr. von Fingerlin says : 

" 'Cafeteria' is derived from the Spanish word 
'cafe', which again comes from the Arabic 'guawef', 
the word 'cafe' being found with slight variations 
in almost all modern languages and not French 
alone, in accordance with its common origin, and 
from the Spanish suffix 'tero' or 'dero', meaning 
the one who does, keeps or makes, from which 
again the ending 'teria', i. e., the thing done, kept,' 
or made. Hence 'cafeteria' means a place where 
coffee is kept or made, a coffeehouse in its pristine 
signification. Compare 'pane', bread ; 'panadero', 
baker; 'panaderia', bakery; 'zapato', shoe, 'zapatero,' 
shoemaker; 'zapateria', shoemaker's shop, also 
trade of shoemaker; 'sastre', tailor; 'sastreria', 
tailor's shop, etc., etc. 

" 'Cafeteria' is pronounced ka-fay-tay-reea, with 



the accent or stress on the 'e'. The usual Spanish 
diphthong 'ia' is dissolved in these -cases, each letter 
being pronounced separately and not in one wave 
sound, the Spanish 'i' being pronounced like the 
English 'e', and V has approximately the Italian 
sound of 'a' in English. The literal interpretation 
is 'place where coffee is sold or kept'." 

Prof. Julius C. Behnke, professor of modern lan- 
guages at Occidental College, agrees, in the essen- 
tials, with Dr. Lummis and Prof, von Fingerlin, 
but goes a little further, characterizing the Ameri- 
can use of the term to designate places where 
guests serve substantial meals to themselves as ab- 
surd. Prof. Behnke says : 

" 'Cafeteria', with stress upon the 'i' (ee), is a 
place where light refreshments only should be 
served, i. e., coffee, milk, chocolate, cake, bread, etc., 
but no 'meals', soup, viands and vegetables. 'Cafe- 
teria' is a Spanish word, 'cafe' being both French 
and Spanish, and the ending 'eria', joined to 'cafe' 
for euphony's sake by a 't', indicates that such 
goods are being sold at that particular store or 
place. Take 'pan', bread; 'panadero', baker; 'pana- 
deria', bakery. The word 'cafeteria' is not often 
used in Spanish countries and theadaptation of this 
name for a restaurant, where the guests are to wait 
on themselves, would be an absurd proposition in 
foreign lands. 'Cafeteria' is the American accepta- 
tion of a misnomen for what it is made to repre- 
sent." 

These authoritative elucidations of the pronuncia- 
tion and meaning of the word "cafeteria" are of pe- 
culiar interest to Los Angeles ; for although the 
word was not first used commonly in this city, so 
far as its adaptation by Americans is concerned — 
the original American cafeteria having been estab- 
lished in Chicago, I am credibly informed — the first 
successful attempt to conduct a cafeteria the busi- 
ness of which was systematized is said to have been 
made something like four years since on North Hill 
street in this city. Since then probably a dozen have 
sprung up in various parts of the business section 
of the city, some under the ordinary name of restau- 
rant, others under the Spanish name. 

While discussing this word "cafeteria" on my 
way to my office the other day, an acquaintance 
suggested that I delve into the inviting subject of 
the Welsh "rarebit". I surmise that he was poking 
fun at me for having gently corrected him, the day 
before, for having referred to this dainty dish as a 
"rarebit". I remembered that, years ago, some- 
body whom I had regarded as qualified to speak 
had proven to my own satisfaction that the proper 
word to use in designating this particular dish was 
Welsh "rabbit", and that no good authority existed 
for the use of the term "rarebit". After having 
brushed up my memory I concluded that my in- 
formant was Andrew James Symington, the noted 
English critic, who, I believe, some twenty years 
ago wrote me that the word had its origin some- 
thing in this wise : 

Many years ago, when several Englishmen re- 
turned from a day's hunting in Wales empty-hand- 



Pacific Outlook 



.1 a feast of 
artificial r it might have been called so, to 

: for dinner t" the unlucky huntsmen. If 
rabbi not plentiful on the moors or in the 

hills of Wales or the South of England, cheese and 
ale always wore, in those days ;<> now, and of 
melted cheese and ale, with minor contributions, the 
"rabbit" that refused to come out of his lair found 
a happy substitute. The originator of the dish 
named it "Welsh rabbit," and Welsh rabbit it has 
remained to this day. except in the minds of some — 
even many— who have entertained the absurd no- 
tion that tile word "rabbit" is a corruption of "rare- 
hit" (as if "a rare bit"). 

\s further evidence of the probability that the 
word had its origin in the manner referred to, and 
that "rarebit" is not proper, the Century diction- 
ary — which contains some good things, in spite of 
Dr. Lummis's criticisms of the things of the other 
variety which he has found therein — quotes the 
following from an eminent British authority: 

"Welsh rabbit is a genuine slang term, belonging 
to a large group which describe in the same humor- 
ous way the special dish or product or peculiarity 
of a particular district. For examples, an Essex 
lion is a calf: a Fieldlane duck is a baked sheep's 
head ; Glasgow magistrates or Norfolk capons are 
red herrings: Irish apricots or Minister plums are 
potatoes: Gravesend sweetmeats are shrimps.'' 

Can anybody inform we what a "Yamhill goose" 
or a "Cape Cod turkev" is? 

+ + • 

How the Songstress "Was Cured 

Recently a story has been going the rounds con- 
cerning King Edward and a young Dutch violinist, 
and it reminds a correspondent of another and less 
congenial encounter between Marie Frausch, who 
lived in the time of Frederick the Great, and the 
officers of that emperor's household. Whenever 
anything or anybody displeased the haughty 
Frausch, she, after the manner of prima donnas in 
general, would suddenly become too hoarse to sing. 

One evening there was to be sung an opera in her 
repertoire, and it was expected that the king would 
attend. At the appointed hour the manager came 
forward and announced that, owing to a sore throat, 
Fraulein Frausch was unable to appear. The peo- 
ple were preparing to leave the (house : but His 
Majesty rose and commanded them to keep their 
seats. A few moments afterward an officer and four 
dragoons entered the capricious singer's room. 

"Fraulein," said the officer, "the king inquires af- 
ter your health." 

"The king is very good," said Frausch, with a 
pout: "but 1 have a sore throat." 

"His Majesty is aware of the fact, and has charged 
me to take you to the military hospital to be cured." 

Fraulein, turning very pale, suggested that they 
were jesting, but was told that Prussian officers 
never indulge in persiflage. Soon she found her- 
self in a coach with four men. 

"I am a little better now," Frausch faltered, "and 
I will try to sing." 

"Back to the theater!" said the officer to the 
coachman 

* + + 

Off tKe Old BlocK 

Father — Got a fall, did you? Well, I hope you 
didn't cry like a baby? 

Son — No, Dad, I didn't cry. I just said one word 
— the same as you'd have said ! — Punch. 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 
Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

ii you imagine the future of Los Angeles? It 
is today 300,000 nearer a city Of a million popula- 
tion than it was J5 years ago. There is no question 
of its continuous growth. If you do have the powi 
of imagination to look into the future you should 
own Business Property. Read this: 

"Twenty-five years ago ("day the school board of 
Los Angeles city, having sold the old Spring Street 
school lot on tlie corner of Spring and Second 
Streets (the present site of the Bryson Building), 
purchased a lot with 120 feet fronting on Spring 
Street and an equal one on Bro.idu ay (then Fort 
Street) for $12,500. Mercantile Place now runs 
through the property. The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages. The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is 100 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial, Los Angeles Times, June 1. 1908. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
'business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




PURE 

Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

. Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selecLed 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

S29 East Fifth St. 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 

W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Tel. E-1467 
Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



10 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




At the "Log Cabin" 

One of the most largely attended receptions of 
the summer was that given Saturday afternoon at 
the "Log Cabin" on West Adams street, by Mrs. 
Ira Warren Phelps of Ingraham street and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lewis Reeves Garrett, who came in 
from her summer home, Casa Los Robles, and 
opened the house for the occasion. The hostesses 
were assisted in receiving by Mesdames Mathew T. 
Robertson, R. M. Widney, Boyle Workman, R. J. 
Waters, Nestor Hasson, Reuben Shettler,. Charles 
T. Ensign, Herman Darling, Addison Day, H. H. 
Kerckhoff, Frank Cattern, S. H. Garrett, F. E. Gar- 
rett, Frank Warner Phelps, W. G. Matthews, David 
Thornton, Robert Westbrook, Thomas Lee Wool- 
wine, Jefferson D. Gibbs, Tom E. Robinson, Harry 
Callender, Miss Kemper and Miss Katherine Kem- 
per: Nearly four hundred guests were present. 

Los Angelans Start for Europe 

A large party of Los Angelans left Saturday over 
the Santa Fe. They will pass through Canada on 
their way to New York, whence they will sail for 
Europe. They contemplate traveling through the 
British Isles in coaches, and through the continent 
in private cars. They are scheduled to return early 
in September. The party included Professor W- H. 
Housh and Mrs. Housh and their son, Harvey, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank B. Harbert, Dr. Ruth Wood, 
Mrs. B. F. Chandler, Miss Mary Phillipson, Miss 
Carrie Conger, Miss Julia Monette, Miss Ida Foster, 
Miss Edna Well, Miss Margaret T. Kinney, Pro- 
fessor William L. Judson, Colin Palmerston and 
William Hellman. 



Mrs. Lott Entertains 

In honor of Mrs. Jirah D. Cole, Jr., who is visit- 
ing her mother, Mrs. Charles A. Gardner of Pasa- 
dena, and Mrs. Jirah D. Cole of No. 2716 South 
Grand avenue, Mrs. Harry Clifford Lott of No. 912 
West Twentieth street entertained with a tea at her 
home Saturday afternoon. A brilliant feature of 
the occasion was the rendition of a programme oi 
modern music by Mr. and Mrs. Lott. The hostesses 
were assisted in receiving by Mrs. Katherine Kim- 
ball Forest, Mrs. Jackson Gregg, Mrs. Jirah D. Cole, 
Mrs. Harry Thompson and Miss Katherine Elbbert. 



Miss Locke Says Adieu 

Miss Josephine Locke of Hollywood, who has 
been giving- a series of lectures on Dante, interpret- 
ing him from the viewpoint of modern psychology, 
bade adieu to her friends at a tea Thursday after- 
noon. She will leave in August for Japan, going by 
way of Portland, Oregon. During her absence she 
will lecture in Portland, Japan and Hawaii, after 
which she will sail for Italy, arriving in that coun- 
try during the year 1911. 



The marriage of Miss Ma}' Hagar and Prof. Gil- 
bert W. Deniston took place Tuesday evening at the 
home of the bride's uncle, the Rev. E. A. Healey, 



D. D., on West Thirty-fifth street, Dean Healey 
officiating. The bride has been one of the teachers 
at the McKinley home, and the groom is professor 
of economics and sociology at the University of 
Southern California. Prof. Deniston has secured a 
year's leave of absence and will take his bride to 
reside in Madison, Wis., while he takes the work 
for the Ph. D degree at the University of Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Taylor of No. 243 West 
Adams street gave a large dancing party Tuesday 
evening for their sons, Edward and Ellis Taylor, 
who have recently returned from Columbia uni- 
versity. The host and hostess were assisted in re- 
ceiving by Miss Barbara Taylor. 

Miss Katherine Ayre of Boston, who is visiting 
her cousin, Miss Katherine Banning, of No. 945 
. Westlake avenue, was complimented guest Monday 
at a luncheon with which Miss Madeline King en- 
tertained at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank W. King, No. 903 Westlake avenue. 

Mrs. F. E. Chamberlain and daughters, Miss 
Ardell and Miss Lorraine, left Sunday for a visit to 
Mrs. Chamberlain's former home at Auckland, New 
Zealand, and are planning to remain there until the 
New Year. Dr. Chamberlain accompanied his fam- 
ily as far as San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Grimshaw of Goldfield, Nev., 
have come to Los Angeles to spend the summer. 
Mr. Grimshaw is one of Goldfield's capitalists, who, 
with his wife, recently completed a trip from San 
Francisco to New York by water, visiting the Pana- 
man canal zone en route. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Bowman of No. 910 East 
Forty-seventh street announce the marriage of their 
daughter, Miss Mary Virginia, and William B. 
Bland, which took place June IS in Mexico Chry, 
Mexico. Mr. Bland is proprietor of the American 
Press in Mexico City. 

The marriage of Miss F. Fern Andrews and L 
Whitney Bray took place Tuesday evening in Ber- 
ean hall, Temple auditorium. The bride and groom 
were attended by Mr. and Mrs. George M. Dantley 
as best man and matron of honor. 

Miss Pearl B. Jordan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer C. Jordan of No. 466 Solano avenue, was 
married Monday evening to Raymond Heffelfinger 
of this city in the Church of the Angels. The Rev. 
Harry Thompson, officiated. 

Announcement has been made of the engagement 
of Miss Marthe Kaetzel of Paris, France, and John 
H. Beneke. Miss Kaetzel is now the guest of her 
cousins, Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Schwarz of No. 3021 
Key West street. 

Lieutenant General Adna R. Chaffee and Mrs. 
Chaffee have announced the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Helen Valentine Chaffee, and Lieu- 
tenant John Hastings Howard, Ninth United States 
cavalry. 

In Christ Episcopal church Tuesday morning, the 
Rev. Baker P. Lee officiating, Miss Edith Churchill 
Allison, formerly of this city, was united in mar- 
riage with Sidney McHarg of Calexico. At the con- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



elusion of the ceremony a wedding breakfast was 
i the bridal party' ai Hotel Alexandria. Mr. 
ami Mrs. McHarg will make an extended trit 
through the North and East and then visit Europe, 
remaining abroad for several months. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Van Dyke, accompanied by 
their daughter, Miss Lillian, and two suns, will 
leave soon for Europe. They will remain abroad 
about five months. 

Mr. and Mr<. George P. Thresher of Westmore- 
land Place, Saturday evening entertained a number 
"f guests, who enjoyed an illustrated lecture given 
by the host. 

Mrs. Edward J. Trice of Severance street has an- 
nounced the engagement of her daughter. Miss 
Beulah Marie, and David Emery Bradley, formerly 
hicago. 

Miss Gladys Rowley, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
( >. J. Rowley of No. 2071 La Salle avenue, has re- 
turned from Berlin, where she had been studying 
music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Trask will entertain Sat- 
urday evening for their son, Harrell Trask, and Mrs. 
Trask's niece, Miss Elinor Harrell of Palo Alto. 

Mrs. C. A. Burcham and Miss Helen Kimball left 
early this week for a two months' visit to Hawaii. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Clark and daughter of 
Hollywood have gone abroad for six months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hall of Pittsburg, Pa., have 
come to this city to live. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

"The Emigrant" 

Since our greatly-beloved and worldwide honored 
Mark Twain, the prince of American humorists,, 
wrote the books which will live in American litera- 
ture centuries after hundreds of his contemporaries 
shall have been forgotten — books which have made 
thousands of gloomy hearts cheerful — we have not 
read a book which strikes a chord so closely in uni- 
son- with his as "The Emigrant", being the life, ex- 
perience and humorous adventures of Adolph 
Jaeger, emigrant to South America in 1882, to Aus- 
tralia in 1885, and to California in 1908. This book 
is an autobiography. But unlike most biographical 
works it vibrates with human interest from cover 
to cover. It "embodies actual real life occurrences, 
travels and adventures ; the lights and shades of a 
genuine love story or stories (as also a few other 
love affairs); humorous incidents and yarns; and. 
not least, a solid, practical lesson almost throughout 
on working and forcing one's way from very poor 
circumstances up to a fair share of wealth." 

The book is soon to be issued from a Los An- 
geles press. The manuscript has passed through 
the hands of the writer, who prophesies for the 
work a strong demand. 



A Worh of Art 

It is not very often that a business catalogue is of 
sufficient merit, as a work of art, to call for news- 
paper comment, but there is at least one such in Los 
Angeles. It is a "women's catalogue" issued by the 
Wm. H. Hoegee Co. The illustrations are the most 
beautiful art will produce. It is a gem, and worth 
seeing, whether one wishes anything to which it 
directs attention or not. 



<\^Vm^I 



Sii. HmiAinvAV ^' 




^ 



So. Hill. Srwritr 



A. PU8BNOT CO. 



ORIENTAL RUG SALE 



Our rug buyer leaves for the Oriental rug market 
soon, hence a thorough clean-up of the season's 
business is desired now. Prices are reduced to half — 
in some cases less than half Oriental Rug prices. 

Rich Persian Rugs 

Average Size 4x8 feet, all shapes, choice, 4jGi"k 

10 Mossouls, Regular Price $ 90.00 Each 

10 Irans„ Regular Price 120.00 Each 

6 Irans, Regular Price 90.00 Each 

iz Sarabends, Regular Price 120.00 Each 

IS Mossouls, Regular Price 98.00 Each 

3 Sarabends, Regular Price 100.00 Each 

Fine Turkish Rugs 

Average Size 4x8 feet, All Shapes. (tOQ 7C 

Your choice at <pZ,.7. I 

25 Kazaks, Regular Price $54.00 Each 

20 Kazaks, Regular Price 60.00 Each 

8 Kazaks, Regular Price 50.00 Each 

6 Kazaks, Regular Price 4500 Each 

MANY OTHER UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITIES 
IN FINE RUGS 



@ 



Japanese and Oriental 

ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANT) EMB'HOI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kal^iuchi Bros. /S>°rL 

533 South Broadway 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We can put you up a home in almost any part of 
the city — from Boyle Heights to the Westlake Dis- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Harvey McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



12 



Pacific Outlook 




Bob Jones of Yale 

"Bob Jones of Yale", at the Belasco — a drama 
which would naturally lead you to picture the real 
live college-bred son of "Old Eli" — comes within 
the range of your vision amid the palms and beau- 
tiful mountains of Vera Cruz. In looking out upon 
the distant mountains and through the bewildering 
scenery of Old Mexico one loses himself, for a mo- 
ment and feels that he is actually livinp - among all 
this grandeur. The stage settings are wonderfully 
well-planned. A real palm, fifteen feet high, is 
growing to the left. Date palms and other species 
of tropical plants and shrubs are placed thickly here 
and there. 

The play makes one feel that although he has 
seen some Mexican characters and plots, he must 
go away with something lacking — something has 
not happened; something dissatisfies him. There is 
such a diplomatic air and so much of it that when 
the few moments of emotional frivolities do arrive 
they are of such a cool type that one does not feel 
relieved from the strain of deep drama. To make 
"Bob Jones of Yale" entertaining, to give it the 
proper poise, the role of Princess Dulcinia should 
be taken by an actress capable of diverting a fair 
share of attention from the hero of the play, Bob 
Jones, Yale, '06, the part taken by Lewis Stone. Mr. 
Stone gives to Bolb Jones a strong and uplifting 
tone. With his sarcastic humor he holds the atten- 
tion of the audience and in great measure makes 
up for the weaknesses exhibited by some of the sup- 
port. Miss Smythe does well in her delineation of 
the coquetry which makes Princess Dulcinia a real- 
ly delightful personage, but Monday night she did 
not appear to be equal to the more serious scenes. 
When she pitched her voice in a high key it sounded 
"stagey". Miss Adele Farrington as Countess Lisa 
was artistic and graceful. William Yerance as 
Marshal Mendoza made a profound and dignified 
War Minister of Lorento. Howard Scott as Garcia, 
secret agent for Marshal Mendoza, reminded one 
more of a Southern gentleman than of a hot-headed 
Mexican conspirator. The meeting of the three 
Yale classmates inspires the playgoer on account of 
the truly American welcome when they meet in 
Vera Cruz. But in spite of its faults "Bob Jones of 
Yale" is worth seeing. It is refreshing, to say the 
least. 

D. O. N. 



Faversham Has Four New Plays 

From the cloistered quiet of his beautiful summer 
retreat in Old Surrey, England, William Faversham, 
who is now a Felix Ismar star, sends word of ex- 
tensive plans for his forthcoming theatrical season, 
the details of which he will take up actively when 
he brings his vacation to an end and sails for home 
about the middle of August. Not since he became a 
stellar idol has the hero of "The Squaw Man" con- 



fronted such a period of pretentious production as 
he has mapped out for himself this year, for it is his 
intention to present for the first time no less than 
four new plays, three of which will be from the 
pens of native authors. 

It has been arranged that Mr. Faversham's season 
will commence in the West, probably in Indian- 
apolis, a week earlier than September 28, on which 
date he will begin an engagement of four weeks in 
Chicago. For his first vehicle Mr. Faversham has 
chosen "The World and His Wife", a powerful play / 
much to his liking and which was especially written 
to fit his talents by Charles Frederick Nirdlinger, a 
one-time New York dramatic writer and critic of 
prominence. 

In Carpenter's entertaining tale, "The Code of 
Victor Jallot", with its Creole setting in the locale 
of New Orleans, Mr. Faversham has discovered 
rich dramatic possibilities of which he has been 
quick to take advantage, for he has obtained the 
exclusive stage rights to the story which now is 
being novelized by the author. Later the piece will 
be rechristened and he hopes to produce it before 
the New Year in New York City, where his annual 
metropolitan season will commence in Daly's 
Theater November 2. 

Two other plays will be found in the Faversham 
repertoire — "The Right to Lie", by Mme. de 
Grassac, one of the authors of "The Marriage of 
Kitty", and another by Martha Morton as yet un- 
finished and untitled that will deal with American 
social life. 

The final concert of the Orpheus Club's season at 
Simpson auditorium Tuesday evening was a suc- 
cess. Mr. Dupuy's direction certainly is deserving 
of a compliment. The club numbers were rendered 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zhe Starr flMano Co.- 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



faultlessly. Mis* Faith Na . charmed the 

audience by her rendition of "My Heart is Weary", 
by Thon . by i iiradani ; and "A 

Barque at Midnight", by Lambert. To the voci- 
ferous en responded with "My Love's an 
Arbutus", bj Stanford, and "The Quest", bj Smith. 
LeRo) Jepson created a furore. His programmed 
numbers were the cavatina from "Faust" and "Salve 
di Mora", by Gounod ; and for the inevitable en- 
- he responded by' singing twice "The Years at 
the Spring", by Mrs. Beach. Robert Granger sang 
Schumann's "Ich Grolle Nicht", giving Stewart's 
"Friar Tuck's Song" after an encore. Mrs. Ada 
Marsh Chick accompanied at the piano and Mr. 
Strobridge at tlic piano. Few cities of the size 
of Los Angeles are Idessed with such an organiza- 
tion as the I >rpheus Club. One may be excused 
for wishing that its season would never end. 



Nance < )'Neil opened her engagement at the Au- 
ditorium Monday with "The Fires of St. John". 
Thursday night "Magda" was substituted. McKee 
Rankin is her leading man. The play has been well 
attended and the audiences appear to have received 
it with pleasure. 



Madame Mauricia Morichini, the famous Metro- 
politan opera singer, w ho has (been singing; at the 
< Irpheum, rendered Gounod's "Redemption" at the 
offertory in St. Vincent's church Sunday morning. 



Benjamin Fay Mills, head of the Fellowship or- 
ganization in this city, in speaking on the subject, 
"The Play of Rosmersholm" Sunday morning, said 
of this play, recently seen by Los Angeles audi- 
ences: 

"It is not a true representation of idealism. There 
are idealists in the world, but none in 'Rosmers- 
holm'. An idealist is a man who believes that at 
the heart of humanity there is a plan and purpose 
seeking for expression. And the individual believes 
that as the powerful play goes on, he may contri- 
bute a verse. Are there no stalwart, well rounded 
men who have thought themselves into the larger 
faith, the grander hope and greater love without be- 
ing hypnotized by designing, half-made women? 
Are there not cleareyed incorruptible leaders of the 
march of social progress who are neither Rosmers 
nor Brendells nor Mortensgards? Such a tragedy 
is never a necessity. Rosmer and Rebecca march 
off the stage in mock-heroic, as one said, 'just as 
though they were going to do something great.' 

"Rosmer knew the secret when he said that men 
could be emancipated only by freeing their spirits 
and purifying their wills. If either Rebecca or 
Rosmer had told the whole truth at the last and 
proposed to live heroically henceforward no matter 
what happened to them, they would have found a 
way to save all their problems. It is only a narrow 
and conventional morality that can 'kill happiness.' 
On the other hand, this does not mean we are to dis- 
regard the moral acquisitions of the race in the 
name of individuals or of social freedom. 

"Rosmer says that nothing but innocence, peace- 
ful happy innocence, can bring content. He does 
not know. It is not innocence, but virtue that 
brings content. All have sinned, but few have per- 
manently failed, and I say again there is a way out 
of the hardest human condition by committal to the 
spirit of the trust and love." 




ffl Dragon Trade MarK /£ 

it 4 tt * 

Sing Fat Co., inc. 

Largest Chinese and Japanese Bazaar in 
America 

STORES 
New Location, 548-550 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 
S. W. Cor. California and Dupont Sts. 
1121 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 

R ^^ B 

E f e=SS Bfe^a u 

s II.', I \M HYM y.l 3 IA i II s 



D 

E 
N 

T 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



PROPERTIES 



N 

E 

s 

S 



XdnberbiU Sbirt Co 



Mahers of Gentlemen's 
Custom Shirts 



Phone F 6715 



4-14-K SoutH Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 

Between Fourth and Fifth Streets.. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fi xiils 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co.. Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 
ROBERT KADKON, Sole Agent far Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle 


{Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loans, 


Investments, 










Insurance 








GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

Real Estate 






Phor 


t F 1466 






902 Security BUg., Los Angeles 


Col. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



By Perez Field 

Mrs. Helma Heynsen-Jahn has removed her 
studio from the Blanchard building to No. 345 South 
Spring street, where she is charmingly located in 
spacious quarters. Mr. Jahn's work is of so high 
a quality that it deserves inspection. She confines 
herself almost exclusively to portraiture in her 
painting, and that she has attained notable success 
is attested by several portraits recently finished, 
which hang in her studio. We reproduce this week 
a portrait of Mrs. Goetz, the mother of Miss Mar- 
garet Goetz of this city. It is a delightful character 
study, strong in execution and delicate in percep- 
tion. Mrs. Jahn does not sacrifice the individuality 
of her sitters to the exigencies of her technique. 
Her best results are obtained spontaneously. She 
has finished two studies of Mrs. D. M. Riordan — 
one, a pastel, is intimate and penetrating, and the 
other, done in oil, shows the "grand dame" armored 




Portrait of Mrs. Goetz 

By Mrs. Heynsen-Jahn 

with the barriers of conventional costume. These 
two studies demonstrate the artist's skill, the pastel 
being a particularly interesting accomplishment. A 
three-quarters length portrait of Mr. Baumgardt is 
done in a bold vise of the brush, llhe likeness is 
good and one realizes the lecturer, confident and 
secure in the knowledge of his theme. Other por- 
traits are those of Mrs. Campbell Johnston, not 
wholly complete, and one of the artist's mother 
beautifully posed, -as most of Mrs. Jahn's subjects 
are. 

The frieze cornice of the studio is lined with 
sketches and on the walls are numerous canvases 
on which are drawn the heads of cnildren. The 
merit of Mrs. Jahn's work is in its characterization 
— in the fidelity of her intuitions. She has profited 
by the best schooling under Herterich, Lefebvre, 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. NATHANSON 

LADIES' TAILOR 

and 

HABIT MAKER 

...Highest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 

216 Mercantile Place 



cJ?5" 




We 

Pay 

Special 

Attention 

To 

Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



-tant and vnii Lenbach. Her standard is a high 
maintained by a real joy in her work. 

The exhibition of by Ralph Fullerton 

ine in the Blanchard gallery lu< proved of 
siderable interest. It comprises fifty studies in oil, 
en pencil drawings, one of which we 

reproduced last week. It is evident that Mr. Mo 
is a serious student seeking to interpret certain 
if nature which appeal to him. lie has not 
found himself as yet and it is difficult to ascertain 
precisely what he is looking for. The dominant 
•rk is mournful. His pictures are un- 
happy rather than despairing. They suggest the 

sing of ,.ne's energies rather than battling with 
the elements. — a resignation to dour days. The 

large pictures, Moonrise — Oak Knoll and Early 
Evening — Plaza, are more subtle in treatment, na- 
turally, than the sketches, and foreshadow a refine- 
ment of color which the artist may readily attain. 
hut these pictures have nothing blvthe in them and 
it i- not probable that it was intended that they 
should have. However, the collection seems mor- 
bid, depressing without wringing our hearts very 
much. In many cases, as in Pines — Holland, the 
composition is decorative and attractive and the col-' 
oring pleasing, as in The Fields — Holland. The 
Dunes — Holland is an interesting sketch. The world 
is a gloomy place apparently to Mr. Mocine, even in 
supposedly sunny Spain, for the Spanish scenes have 
repression of color as well as those of Holland and 

must have been sought for because two studies 
of Oak Knoll ( Xos. 26 and 27) show a clearer atmos- 
phere than anything else in the gallery. The artist 
may be seeking mystery, only to find himself baffled 
by smiling Nature, who reveals her secret ways to 
but few. Nature repays her devotees with no nig- 
gardly hand. Mr. Mocine is sufficiently equipped 
and sufficiently earnest to gain from her a prize. 
His temperament is poetical rather than realistic, 
as his vision of the Plaza church shows. The build- 
ing in itself is about as severe and bald as a relig- 
ious structure could well be, but the artist has 
veiled it in a light of his own fancy which is far 
from displeasing. These sketches are full of prom- 
ise. It is difficult to pass judgment on color, as 
color is so entirely a matter of personal feeling. 
Nevertheless Mr. Mocine's tones seem to us almost 
sullen, but we frankly admit that we do not fully 
understand this artist's point of view. 



Mrs. William Wendt has just completed a studio 
on Sichel street adjoining that of her husband. At 
present she is working on the preliminary studies 
for a statue to be called "The Student". The figure 
is nude and seated with an arm resting on a sphinx. 
The position of the man is easy and one will watch 
the development of the idea with interest. 



George Cole will begin portraits of his father and 
mother as soon as he recovers from an injury to 
his eyes which he received while en route to Cali- 
fornia. He is painting in oils now, having laid aside 
miniature work for a time. 



Miss Leta Horlocker, who has a studio in the 
Blanchard building, will undertake the direction of 
the new art department in the Girl's Collegiate 
School when it reopens in the autumn. She studied 
with Dow and at Pratt for many years and is pe- 
culiarly well fitted for the purpose of teaching the 



Craftsman jfumiture 



Gustrtv Stickley is the originator and 
only manufacturer of Craftsman Furni- 
ture. We are sole agents for Southern 
California and show a lame stock of 
these goods. 



'Furniture. ^° 

■srna 640-646 SOUTH HILL ST. 

Los Angeles, California 





Plan to Visit, 



Yosemite 
Valley 



— -= . ^ n ' s Season 

NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, or 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 



Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Pine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 

Phone F 5141 Tenth and Main Sts. 



A Radical Change In 
Furniture Values 

"We have just established a general price reduction 
covering our entire furniture stock. Selling cost 
has 'been cut 'on every article. New values are at 
least io% better than in any other store in town. 
We merely ask comparison. The new selling figures 
will be maintained permanently. Before you pur- 
chase elsewhere, learn values here. 

Strictly One Price— The Same to All 

Los Angeles Furniture Co. 

631-633-635 S. SPRING ST. between 6th and 7th 



16 



Pacific O u 1 1 • • k 



decorative arts. She has been a careful student of 
Japanese prints and extracts from them many beau- 
ties which elude the uninitiated. In her studio are 
numerous attractive studies, both in water color and 
in oils. 



The Fine Arts League has issued an, appeal to its 
members in the form of a pamphlet, striving to stir 
their imaginations into activity and to induce them 
to collect material for the proposed museum. It is 
proposed to build a music hall as well as a museum 
building. 

* + * 

Theater Gives Souvenir Hats 

Word from New York says that even the "Merry 
Widow" company at the New Amsterdam theater 
has tabooed the enormous "Merry Widow" hat with 
the result that, instead of the Brobdignagian bon- 
nets which took their name from the charming Vi- 
ennese operetta, Charlotte Corday sailor hats were 
given away as souvenirs on the occasion of "The 
Merry Widow's" 275th consecutive performance in 
New York at the New Amsterdam theater, June 13. 

Some time ago, before the "Merry Widow" hat 
become a national calamity, it was decided to fit- 
tingly commemorate the 275th performance of "The 
Merry Widow" in New York* by presenting every 
woman who should attend the Saturday matinee on 
June 13, with a genuine, gigantic "Merry Widow" 
sailor; but when the enormous headgear began to 
stop trains, gash open the features of unfortunate 
mankind and become the subject of pulpit denuncia- 
tion, it was feared that a riot might occur at the 
theater when the hats were given away. Then, too, 
the big hat lost its vogue with the women folk who 
decided to be fashionable, and even some of the 
girl members of "The Merry Widow" company 
criticized the management for selecting a millinery 
has-been as souvenirs for an up-to-date show. 

As a result of these numerous objections to the 
original intention, it was decided to leave the mat- 
ter to the votes of the company's female members, 
and with one voice "The Merry Widow" folk votea 
to forget the "Merry Widow" hat and substitute a 
Charlotte Corday as a souvenir. Following the de- 
cision, a cablegram was dispatched to the Mes- 
dames Reboux of Paris, from whom the "Merry 
Widows" had been ordered, instructing the French 
milliner to substitute the Charlotte Cordays, which 
are now said to be the Parisian rage. 

* + * 

A Feline Hobo 

A great many dogs travel on railways simply by 
reason of their instinctively tramplike disposition. 
Many such, great favorites with trainmen, are 
everywhere received and cared for by the men. about 
the yards as privileged guests. 

The most remarkable rival to the railway tramp 
dogs, says the New York Tribune, is the well known 
Maltese hobo Jinks, which, it would appear, is not 
only a well looked after tramper of this country, 
but is a globe trotter as well. 

Jinks appeared at the Union Station in Cincin- 
nati some years ago as the sole survivor, apparent- 
ly, of an Ohio steamer that had been wrecked. The 
big Maltese at once appealed to the sympathies, of 
the railway men at the Cincinnati station, who im- 
mediately became her fast friends. 

In a little while Jinks evinced, a peculiar streak 
for a cat, the feline being ordinarily of quite a do- 
mestic turn,- — she wanted to "look about". At first 



her trips were short ones ; but eventually she in- 
creased her mileage and the length of her sojourns 
from home. 

In view of Jinks' disposition to see the world, the 
Cincinnati employees finally determined to afford 
her an opportunity to do so to the fullest extent. 
They provided her with a handsome collar bearing 
her name and address, to which was added a re- 
quest that her friends everywhere enter her doings 
in a small diary inclosed in a miniature knapsack 
strapped to her back. 

Jinks reappears from time to time in this country : 
when, railway men aver, there are always interest- 
ing items added to her itinerary. 

Jinks' diary records the fact that she has survived 
four big railway wrecks in this country, besides a 
shipwreck in the Indian Ocean. She has crossed 
the Atlantic eight times, and the Pacific twice, and, 
though she has never, so far as known, taken the 
trip up the Nile, she has crossed the Mediterranean 
on two different occasions. 

Jinks one year put in most of her time on a 
British vessel in Chinese waters, when she was 
stolen by a native, but was afterward recovered by 
the British seamen, who had taken a great fancy to 
■ her. The attachment was not, however, entirely 
mutual ; for at the end of the year the Maltese pat- 
riotically boarded an American man of war, the 
crew of which provided perhaps the most interest- 
ing items in her diary. With them she returned to 
the Pacific coast. Here, however, she remained 
only a. few days, taking passage for South America. 
She next appeared in New York, coming on a liner 
from Cuba, having evidently worked her way 
through South America. 

Jinks landed from a train at Buffalo recently; and, 
after a brief stay with her railroad friends at the 
station, departed on a train for Vancouver, and for 
the present is lost to history. 

Very Much Out 

Recently an acquaintance called on some ladies 
in an Alabama town who had at the time been much 
worried by an apparently endless succession of 
callers. The door was opened by Augustus Butts, 
the faithful old butler. 

"Are the ladies in?" asked the caller. 

"No, ma'am, they'se all out." 

"I am so sorry that I missed them," continued 
the visitor, handing him her cards. "I particularly 
wished to see Mrs. Jones." 

"Yes, ma'am, thank yo, ma'am," responded Au- 
gustus. "They'se all out, ma'am, and Mrs. Jones 
is particularly out, ma'am." 
* * * 

"Was Right This Time 

Old Maid (in upper berth of Pullman, ringing 
bell violently)— "Porter!" 

"Yaas, ma'am." 

"I'm sure there's a man under my bed." — Bo- 
hemian. 



SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 

of the American Petroleum Company 

At par, with an equal stock bonus. A choice in- 
vestment security with strong profit features. 

Fielding J. Stilson Co. 

Financial Agents 
305 H. W. Hellman Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



The Poacher's Excuse 

Frederick Kemochan, New York's millionaire 
d at a dinner about the friends 
who are continually brought before him for break- 
ing t! ■ law in their motor cars. 

"M^st of them," he said, "pay the fine and depart 
silentlv. Now and then, however, a defense is put 
in — the strangest, the most startling defense — like 
that iif tl'i 

"A Pittsburg man had a shooting lodge in Scot- 
land, and his head keeper caught a poacher one day, 
stalking along with his ringer on the trigger of his 
gun. 

"'Hoot, num. what are ye doin' theer?" tin- 
keeper growled. 

The poacher whispered hurriedly. 

"Hush! You OUght to understand. Isn't your 
master from Pennsylvania? This is a duel in tin- 
American style — with shotguns, you know. The 
Look out 1 I think my opponent sees me.' 

"With a muttered apology the gamekeeper hur- 
ried out of range." 
first to spy the other fires. What was that rustling? 1 

* + + 

Do Not LiKe Mignonette 

A householder wdio had heard that flies disliked 
the scent of mignonette tried placing a box of the 
fragrant flowers on a window sill and leaving out 
the unsightly flv screen. She claims that this ex- 
periment room is as free from flies as the most be- 
screened parts of the house, and intends to do away 
with all netting this summer, trusting to plentiful 
window boxes of the mignonette. 

• + * 
Feared Him 

Rector — Susie, I was sorry not to see your 
father at church this morning. 

Susie — Please, no, sir. He went out walking in 
the woods. 

Rector — Ah, Susie, I'm afraid that your father 
does not fear the Lord. 

Susie — Guess he does, too. He took his gun 
with him. — The Nurse. 

4" + + 

Ancient 

The heiress sighed and shook her head. "No, Mr. 
Dalrymple. I can not marry you," she said. "The 
only man I ever loved died at — " A tottering, white- 
bearded veteran in blue strode past the window, 
and Dalrymple said: 'At Gettysburg?" Then, 
with a coarse, unpleasant laugh, he hastened forth, 
and a moment later Casey's poolroom swallowed 
him up. — Ex. 

+ + + 

When He Paid 

"I pay as I go," declared the pompous citizen. 
"Not while I'm running these apartments," de- 
clared the janitor; "you'll pay as you move in." — 

Washington Journal. 

♦ + ♦ 

Smawley — "Do you believe that money talks." 
Ardupp — "You bet I do. I no sooner get un- 
hands on a dollar than it says 'good-by.' " — Chica- 
go News. 

+ * * 

Small Elsie — Grandma, is your teeth good? 
Grandma — No, dear ; I haven't any. 
Small Elsie — Then I'll let you hold my candy till 
I come back. 



Waist Department Presents 

Innumerable 

Dainty Styles at Tempting Prices for the Summer 

Season 

Can you imagine a 
pii asanter or mon 
charming sight on a 
warm summer day 
than a pretty woman 
w earing a dainty t i ool, 
white shirtwaist? It 
imparts to the « i arer 
a> delightful Freshness 
of appearance unaffect- 
ed by the sun's melting 
rays. 

It is our good for- 
tune to be in a position 
to provide every wo- 
man with summer 
shirtwaists, simple or 
most elaborate, plain 
tailored or artistically 
designed from the sheerest of materials combined 
with exquisitely wrought lace and embroidery, in 
endless variety. The important point is just here — 
the PRICES are so reasonable that you can afford 
to indulge in an extravagant assortment of tnese 
summer necessities. 

k "50A\ETttlWG 





■ 
BROADWAY 



COR. FIFTH ST. 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. y 




IV' 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 

Table Knives, Corkscrews, | 

Manicure Goods, Silverware, 

Scissors, Shears, Cutlery ^J 

Specialties and Novelties. "■= 

We grind all kinds of Cutlery and _ 
do it well. 


210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



DuBois <f& Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets A T" f~> /^\ O T 
Draperies /\ [ C(JO 1 

Lace Curtains 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE. SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Perez Field 



Materials and Methods of Fiction, by Clayton 
Hamilton, is a new book announced from the press 
of Baker and Taylor. It is intended to be useful 
to college students and to young authors, and has 
a preface by Prof. Brander Mathews. 



Marotz is a new story by John Ayscough about 
to issue from the press of G. P. Putnam's. The 
scene is laid in southern Italy and Sicily. 



G. K. Chesterton is soon to bring out a new vol- 
ume of his essays entitled "Orthodoxy", a compan- 
ion to his well known book "Heretics". In it he 
will define his own views of life rather than attack 
those of other people. He is also writing a book 
on Shakespeare's clowns and fools. 



Astronomy 'with the Naked Eye, by Garrett P. 
Serviss (Harper's), is a recent book which will be 
of service to the amateur astronomer and will help 
to familiarize young observers with the heavens. 

F. Marion Crawford's latest novel is called "The 
Diva's Ruby" and is soon to come from Macmillans. 

"Get Rich Quick Wallingford", by George Ran- 
dolf Chester (Altemus), is a novel relating the 
amusing experiences of a modern rogue who en- 
tered a country town without a cent and soon lived 
in luxury on the bits of coin he had coaxed from the 
pantry shelves and from other hiding places. 



My Alpine Jubilee, by Frederic Harrison (Dut- 
ton), contains a number of letters and magazine 
articles by this veteran mountaineer, which have 
appeared during the last fifty years. He says of the 
sea that it has "no history, no fruits, no signs of 
human victory or achievement." But the Alps are 
"international. European, humanitarian." And he 
continues : "The poet in his most perverse mood 
never wrote a falser word than when he said, in his 
mad way, 'Man marks the earth with ruin.' No! 
Man clothes the earth with beauty, charm and fruit. 
And nowhere on this planet is this seen in such com- 
pleteness as when in this great Alpine world we 
find how man has made bounteous and glorious 3 
tract which at first was hopeless waste, and which 
still in some aspects seems to overwhelm the mind 
with awe and paralyze the heart with horror. . . . 
'Tis perhaps today the fortieth time that I look on 
this perennial scene of wonder and joy. And never 
have I seen it with such inward delight — delight 
that is shadowed only by this, that I cannot have 
you to share it with me." 

An English critic thinks it may be doubted 
whether many of his countrymen have any true con- 
ception of the wealth of English "literariana" which 
is sprinkled among American collections. "Occa- 
sionally," he says, "a catalogue reaches us from 
some American dealer or bookman of the better 
class which raises in us feelings of envy or of some- 
thing angrier; and when we think of the way in 
which our literary treasures are departing westward 
we wish there could be an enactment against this 



IMPERIAL 


VA LLEY 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 


50 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftus &. Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Are You An Admirer 

Of Ancient and Rare Antiques? Real 
Colonial Furniture, such as: Paul 
Revere Mirrors; Patrick Henry Side- 
board; Gov. Bradford family chairs; 
old mirrors in mahogany and gold; fine 
old blue china; beaten copper and brass 
goods; an endless variety to choose 
from! We are holding a Clearance 
Sale. All goods at about genuine cost 
until July 1st to close. Come in and 

look around at your earliest convenience. The 

store is a veritable museum. 




Lee L. Powers 



612 South Broadway 



Established 1889 



Phones Home Ex 531 
Main 7715 



k TROY 

THE 

\ BEST 



Largest Steam Laundry in 
Southern California 



Troy Laundry 
Company 

Corner 14th and Main Streets 

Uptown Offices 123)4. W. 3rd. 
223 W. 5th. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE K? DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Jirtistic Designs 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7,6 - 7, s 8 p!?n U g T Wt 



* I 



, For- 

grocer 




„ fee* 
Bahmg , . 
w Compamy 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



kind rt, in the same Fashion as the official 

interference with the -ale of Italian pictun 



New Books at the Public Library 

This week three volumes .teat Nations 

ries have been added t'> the Library 
shelves — those treating of Italy, Germany 

l'ran ilumes of another series on 

Holland ami Venice. The technical books treat of 
submarine warfare, microscopy of technical prod 
nets, alternating engineering, ami one more playful 
than the rest deals with "draughts", or as we 

Vmong the biographies are those of 
Judah P. Benjamin and Tvcho Brahe. The Stand- 
ard Sympl y Upton, is the only volume on 

music this week, while Stopfora Brooke writes on 
The Ten Plays of Shakespeare, ami Reinaoh on an- 
cient (ireek mythology. Elementary Logic, by J. 

E. Russell, may he recommended to people wdio 
think they think but do not know how. while The 
Asiatic Danger in the Colonies, by L. E. Xcame 
I 1907), gives excellent reasons why we should try 
to keep people apart who were not born in the same 
parish, and who take their sorrows diversely. The 
idea seems to be that if we were all positively civil 
to each other there would be nothing further to 
worry about. What is the good in having a home 
if you can not slam the door in somebody's face? 

American Finance, by W. R. Lawson, (Black- 
wood, 1906). is a study of the domestic finance of 
the United States, dealing with its evolution, its 
organization, its creative powers and its destructive 
powers. There is a chapter on the waste of the nat- 
ural resources and one on millionaires. 

Modeme Banformen, Iby M. J. Graal (1906), is a 
thick volume filled with illustrations of modern Ger- 
man architecture, interiors and exteriors. It will 
be suggestive to home builders as well as to archi- 
tects. 

*The Shame of the Colleges, by Wallace Irwin 
(Outing Pub. Co., 1907), is a delightfully amusing 
skit on half a dozen universities, including Harvard, 
Vassar and West Point. The author says : "Har- 
vard University — let her deny this if she can — is 
the Amalgamated Gentleman Trust. . . The time 
is coming, and not far distant, when the inhabitants 
of Virginia, Arizona, California, shall turn to the 
East and cry: 'Are there no gentlemen to be had?' 
And Wall Street shall wire back: 'No. They are all 
taking post-graduate courses at Harvard?'" 

Journal of Eugenie de Guerin (Dodd, Mead, 
1893), two volumes of intimate autobiography, im- 
pressionistic and emotional, being chiefly interest- 
ing as a studv in psychology. They were the years 
from 1834 to' 1840. ' 

Ethics and the Materialist Conception of History, 

by Karl Kantsky (Kerr, Chicago, 1907), is an essay 
translated from the German. The author attempts 
to derive moral conception from social custom. 
Whether one agrees with his conclusions or not, the 
volume gives subject for reflection. 

Lincoln in Caricature, by Rufus Rockwell Wil- 
son (1903), is a reprint of thirty-two political car- 
toons issued during the lifetime of the famous 
President. They are curious souvenirs of forgotten 
issues and historic rivalries. 

*The Tragedy of Russia in Pacific Asia, by Fred- 
erick McCormick (Outing Pub. Co., 1907). This is 
an intensely interesting book giving an account of 



%£ 


Exclusive 


^^ ^^ 


Woman's Hatter 


French and E.nglisH 


Models 


Special Creations for the Individual- 


—Approval Solicited 


346 S. Broadway 




jtortratta by 
Pjotflgraptjrj 



Phone 

E1315 



HANA ROBISON 

Residence Studio— 2323 West Ninth Street 

Sittings by Appointment 




Ladies' 
Tailor 



Every garment made in my establishment is de- 
signed to suit the characteristics of each customer. 
My price and workmanship cannot be duplicated in the 
city. A call will convince you. 



903 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orfer on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 

ioo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35°° 

250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



the wretched conditions which prevailed in the Rus- 
sian Army during the Russo-Japanese war, as seen 
at first hand by the author. It is as stirring as a 
romance of adventure and written with snap and 
decision. 

Country Homes of Famous Americans, by Oliver 
Bronson Capen (Doubleday, 1905), contains large 
plates illustrating the houses in which eighteen 
well-known Americans were born or in which they 
lived. The photographs of "Walden" are perhaps 
as interesting as any. 

*The Art of Landscape Painting in Oil Colour, 

by Alfred East (Lippincott, 1907). This is an ex- 
cellent book, both on account of the beautiful illus- 
trations and the value of the text. It consists of a 
series of essays telling how an artist should study 
from nature. They are practical, direct and sugges- 
tive and of value as well to the novice in sketching 
as to the hardened technical expert of soulless dex- 
terity. The well-known academican says : "Na- 
ture is so bountiful that the poverty of a man's 
work can never be due to lack of material, but is' 
rather owing to his incapacity to select judiciously 
from her generous offering". He tells, however, 
the following amusing anecdote in illustration of 
the fact that it is possible for the "plein air" school 
to run the fad for nature study in the ground. "I 
remember a painter, who was a determined 'sticker' 
to nature, starting a picture of apple blossoms. He 
commenced his picture well ahead of the full de- 
velopment of the flowers, and with dogged deter- 
mination made up his mind to 'go for it'. He paint- 
ed the blossom with painstaking efforts to realize 
it according to his ideal of perfection. Conscien- 
tiously he altered his picture with the changing as- 
pects of Nature, till, at length, the blossom van- 
ished, the full-grown leaves appeared and the young 
fruit was developed. When I saw the picture fin- 
ished it was called 'Gathering Apples'." 

*The Jewish Spectre, by George H. Warner 
(Doubleday, 1905). Part of the Jewish spectre as 
explained by the author is what he calls the Wicked 
Heart theory, which is but one remove from the 
Wicked Woman theory. "This theory did little 
harm while restricted to a small and unimportant 
people ; but in operation in civilization at large, 



among people of action and of ideals, it was disas- 
trous." This theory leads to Monasticism, which 
"is a disease, not a cure. The scuttling out of life, 
the failure to face moral problems, is at the root 
of the intellectual disaster of our early centuries. 
Vast numbers of men and women exhibited a moral 
cowardice in taking refuge in religion, and selfishly 
abandoning themselves to an insubstantial and un- 
verifiable metaphysical dream." He says it is no 
merit in the Jews that they do not drink to excess. 
"Drinking is mainly a matter of climate, not of prin- 
ciple. All Northern peoples drink strong stuff, un- 
til by intercourse with the South they can get some- 
thing better. It is the same with the eating habit. 
The judgment of men on these topics has been mis- 
directed. It is not the bad heart that eats and drinks 
grossly, but the Arctic Zone. The mistake is made 
in being born in regions that freeze up — and in stay- 
ing there after being born." If this be true the W. 
C. T. U. had better charter the Southern Pacific and 
bring all inebriates to Southern California to sober 
up and drink lemonade with joy. The new aque- 
duct will probably be finished before they all get 
here, battling for lemon juice hilarity. 

Municipal Ownership in Great Britain, by Hugo 
Richard Meyer (Macmillan, 1906), gives an account 
of various experiments in England and elsewhere 
in government ownership. On the whole the au- 
thor is not favorable to the plan, although he gives 
many instances where the municipal ownership of 
a public service seems to have been profitable to all 
concerned. 

Immigration and Its Effects Upon the United 
States, by Prescott F. Hall (H. Holt, 1907), belongs 
to the American Public Problems series and gives a 
succinct and yet full account of the present condi- 
ions of immigration into his country. One chapter 
is devoted to Chinese immigration and to the ex- 
clusion acts. 

*Fiji and its Possibilities, by Beatrice Grimshaw 
(Doubleday, 1907). This is an entertaining book 
relating the author's experiences in Fiji. Suva, the 
capital of the islands, boasts of a jail which is en- 
closed on three sides by a stone wall, the fourth side 
remaining open to the country. The convicts are 
quite happy in prison and may even be seen running 




HAMMOCKS 

E would extend a most cordial invi- 
tation the many readers of the Out- 
look to come in and inspect our immense 
stock of Hammocks. As in years past, we 
are only showing hammocks of good qual- 
ity. Even the cheapest are selected with 
great care, that we may give full value even 
to those who may come with not o'er full 
purses. In buying under our big roof one 
has the advantages of an almost unlimited 
stock to select from, including not only the 
favorites, but a greater variety of new ideas 
and styles than we have ever had the good 
fortune to secure before. 

"The pleasure will be ours, if we may but show you." 

TTlffi© WML M. IHIOEGEE CO., Mc. 



Both Phone Exchanges 67 



138-140-142 South Main St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



m work in time because if they are 
are shut out of jail as a punishment and 
I he convicts act also as mail 
carriers and seem to be quite charming people. 

Jefferson Davis, by William Dodd (Jacobs, 1 

the American t'risis biographies and relates 
the life of a man who has often been rudely mis- 
ed by Northern historians. 

♦Spirit Teaching, by William Stainton Moses 
Stain ton Moses was a well known 
medium and his writings have great interest for 
psychological students. 

Solar Heat: Its Practical Applications, by Charies 
Henry Pope i Bosti n. 1906), is a pamphlet attempt- 
ing to arouse interest in methods for utilizing the 
sun's rays for heating and human use generally. 

The Real Chinese Question, by Chester Hoi- 
'•'c (Missionary Movement, 1907), is a study in 

oriental characters written by a man who has so- 
journed among the Celestials for a number of years. 

Sienna and Her Artists, by Frederick Seymour 
(Jacobs, Phiia., 1907). The author passed several 
winters in Sienna and while there made notes of his 
observations. The result is agreeable, as the book 
has not the predisposition to be learned. • 

Sappho and Phaon: A Tragedy, by r Percy Mac- 
kaye ( Macmillan. 1907). Resina, the ancient Her- 
eulaneum. with American and German archaeolog- 
as characters. The second prologue reverts to 25 
B. C. and brings Horace and Virgil on the scene, 
while the tragedy itself has Sappho, the Lesbian 
poetess, as central figure. The verse lacks distinc- 
tion. 

The Seven Follies of Science, by John Phin (Van 
Moshand, 1906), second edition. This is a popular 
account of the famous scientific impossibilities and 
the attempts which have been made to solve them. 
They- include squaring the circle, duplication of the 
cube, transmutation of metals, fixation of mercury, 
and the universal solvent. 

::: A Theory of Pure Design, by Denman W. Ross 
(Houghton, Mifflin, 1907). A valuable and sug- 
gestive book of great practical value to the student 
of form and color. For a worker in decorative art 
it contains numerous hints which are helpful, al- 
though all of the theories may not be held to be the 
true explanation of the effects produced by certain 
lines and colors. 

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, by H. C. Marllier (Bell, 
London, 1904), belongs to the British Artists series 
and is abridged from a former edition, giving thus 
an excellent idea of the conceptions of this artist, 
which have much charm while seeming at the same 
time rather fantastic. 

North Italian Painters cf the Rennaissance, by 
Bernhard Berenson (Putnams, 1907). The author 
of this volume is a well known writer on Italian 
ail and this last contribution to the study of paint- 
ing is written with his usual care and discrimination. 

-Men Who Sell Things, by Walter D. Moody 
(McClurg, 1908), is a study of salesmen: the 
"wheelbarrow salesman", the "quick-tempered 
salesman", the "fussy salesman" and various others. 
It is a bright and breezy book, containing many 
suggestions profitable in other lines of work be- 
sides that of commercial ambassador. 



Opportunity 

C. Ridderhof, of \o. 230 Laughlin building, has 
prepared for distribution among those who can 

them copies of two famous poems— "Opportunity", 
by John I. [ngalls, and the reply to this somber 
poem, under the same title, written by T 1) Mc- 

Call. 



re 



"When the president of a very large corpoi 

sad this poem," (b) McCall), says Air. Ridderhof, 

"he exclaimed: 'This gives me new courage, 
strength to overcome what have seemed like so 
many failures in my life. I am glad to have fottnd 

a good, true answer to the [ngalls poem.' That it 

may inspire, encourage others is one of my reasons 
for distributing it." 

Opportunity 
Bv John J. Ingai.ls 
Master of human destinies am I: 
Fame, love ami fortune on my foosteps wait; 
Cities and fields 1 walk, I penetrate 
Deserts and seas remote, and passing by 
Hovel and mart and palace, soon or late 
I knock unbidden once at every gate, 
It" sleeping, wake; if feasting, rise, before 
I turn away; it is the hour of fate 
And those who follow me reach every state 
Mortals desire and conquer every foe 
Save death; while those who doubt or hesitate 
Seek me in vain, and uselessly implore; 
I answer not and I return — no more. 

Opportunity 
Bv T. D. McCalh 
They do me wrong who say I come no more 
When once I knock and fail to find you in; 
For every day I stand outside your door, 
• And bid you wake, and rise to fight and win. 

Wail not for precious chances passed away; 

Weep not for golden ages on the wane. 
Each night I burn the records of the day; 

At sunrise every soul is born again. 

Laugh like a boy at splendors that have sped; 

To vanished joys be blind and deaf and dumb. 
My judgments seal the dead past with its dead, 

Eut never bind a moment yet to come. 

Though deep in mire, wring not your hands and weep; 

I lend my arm to all who say "I can!" 
No shamefaced outcast ever sank so deep 

But yet might rise and be again a man. 

'Dost thou behold thy lost youth all aghast? 

Dost reel from righteous retribution's blow? 
Then turn from blotted archives of the past 

And find the future's pages white as snow. 

Art thou a mourner? Rouse thee from thy spell; 

Art thou a sinner? Sins may be forgiven; 
Each morning gives thee wings to flee from hell. 

Each night a star to guide thy feet to heaven. 



Revival in Mining Anticipated 

J. E. Meyer, well known mining promoter and broker 
in I. os Angeles, has recently opened an office at 202 Mer- 
cantile Place. Mr. Meyer's move would indicate that the 
mining men are getting ready for the big revival in mining 
that is looked forward to by the best informed mining 
men of this section. 

Mr. Meyer's success both as a broker and an operator 
of large mining interests is well known. In his new loca- 
tion .Mr. Meyer will make a specialty of the Standard 
Mines Companies' stock. This property has done splen- 
didly during the recent low copper market and those who 
know state the property will yet be one of the big copper 
producers of this decade. Mr. Meyer states that he will 
handle only high grade securities. 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



Gifts to Hospitals 

"Many witticisms fell daily from the lips of our late King," 
said a Portuguese Consul. 

"The King was, you know, a splendid shot. At a dinner 
the rather inferior shooting of an English visitor was praised 
and some one said : 

" 'And Lord Gadabout, you know, sends everything he 
shoots to the hospitals." 

"The King laughed, and taking the long black cigar from 
his lips he said : 

" 'Naturally, since he never shoots anything but game- 
keepers." 

.3. «{* 4. 

The Printer's Version 

In yesterday's issue, in the closing paragraph of an edi- 
torial headed, "Two False Prophets," the misprinting of 
one word gave an offensive meaning to what, as written, 
was a very innocent remark. In the copy the sentence 
read: "Mr. Slemp speaks unadvisedly, but he has behind 
him a well-defined and vital though sometimes vicious set 
of political theories." But the version in type substituted 
"thieves" for "theories," thus conveying a meaning en- 
tirely foreign to the intent of the writer. — Norfolk Vir- 
ginian-Pilot. 

* + * 

One From W^shing'ton 

"I had a letter from a constituent," said Congressman 
Nathan Wesley Hale of Tennessee, "who asked me to 
forward to him, as quickly as possible, the 'Rules and 
Regulations of Congress.' By return mail I sent him a 
photograph of Joe Cannon. If he understands the game 
like we do. he will have no trouble in seeing that my 
answer is decidedly to the point." — Success Magazine. 

* + 4> 

He Was Prosperous 

City Nephew — Well uncle, did you have a good year? 

Farmer — Did I? Gosh, yes. I had four cows and 
three hogs killed by railroad trains an' two hogs and nine 
chickens killed by antermobiles. I cleared near a thous- 
and dollars. — The Bohemian. 

* + * 

Was Judas Guilty? 

A New York rabbi has made the declaration that it was 
St. Peter, not Judas, who betrayed the Savior, says Will 
Davison in the Stockton Mail. Judas got the money, but 
in view of the recent decision of the courts in the Schmitz 
case, he was not guilty. 

.J. ■£■ ■£■ 

One Short 

She asked him if he was the photographer. He said he 
was. 

She asked him if he took children's pictures. He said 
he did. 

She asked him how much he charged. Pie said, "Four 
dollars a dozen." 

"Then I'll have to go somewhere else," she replied, "I. 
only have eleven." 

* + * 

Master of His Own Destiny 

"Why do you set your alarm clock? You never get up when 
it rings !" 

"No. But I have the satisfaction of knowing that I am 
sleeping late of my own free will, and not by accident. — 
Rehoboth Sunday Herald. 

Relieving the Monotony 

Nan — He proposed to you while the train was going 
around the elevated loop? How odd! 

Fan — Yes, and the engagement lasted till we got clear 
around. You don't know how it relieved the tedium of the 
ride. 

* * * 

Quite Familiar to Them 

"Maude was afraid the girls wouldn't notice her en- 
gagement ring. 

"Did they?" 

'IDid they! Six of them recognized it at once." — Cleve- 
land Plain Dealer. 




ll 11 ^I'lii'^-^- 1 -**^^**^ 
-ill" 







Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



fl Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 






Save Money on Magazines 

It is much cheaper to place annual subscriptions to several magazines at the same time and 
order them all together from us, than it is to buy the same magazines singly or subscribe to 
them separately. Combination club offers are now made by which subscribers to several 
magazines secure bargain prices, sometimes getting three or four magazines for the price of 
one or two. Subscriptions may be sent to different addresses, if desired, and may begin with 
any month. Let us know what magazines you are taking now or what magazines you want 
this year, and we will quote a combination price, showing the saving to be effected. 



SAMPLE BARGAINS 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 ] 

Success 1.00 

Woman's Home Companion 1.00 

Review of Reviews 3.00 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

North American Review 4.00 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

American Magazine 1.00 

The Outlook, (N. Y.) 3.00 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

World's Work 3.00 

Delineator 1.00 

McClure's 1.50 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK .$2.00 \ 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 v 

Etude (musical) 1.50 ) 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 ) 

Success 1.00 [ 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

Pacific Monthly or Sunset 1.50 

PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

Outing 3.00 



PACIFIC OUTLOOK $2.00 

American Magazine, or 1.00 

Any magazine listed in class A which com- 
prises forty publications. 



- $7.00 for $4.00. 

$6.00 for $4.50. 
$6.00 for $4.75. 

$7.50 for $4.00. 

$4.50 for $3.00. 

$3.00 for $2.00. 
$3^50 for $2.00. 
$5.00 for $3.00. 

For $2.00. 



Sunset Subscription Agency 

317 BLANCHARD MALL 

Home Phone Ex. 82 



B10IFJS OTUlDXm 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 



George Baker Jendermen 

ioitoh 



H. C. Jtckerty 

PRESIDENT 



frubttthed every Saturday 
UMIir Bulld'.ng, Lot JtngelrM, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscript, on price SS.OOa year In adoanc*. Jingle copy S 
cents on alt neuts stands. 

Entered is tecond-cliM m»tt*r April (, 1907, at the potloffice at Los Angeles, 
». under the act of Congress of Mirth , 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts 
though he wit] endeavor to do 10 if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them 
Jf your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 5. Los Jrngetes, CaL, July II, I90S Mo. 2 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 
The Paclfta Outlook is nailed to aubacrlbeH through the 

Ton A illicit-* Poal Oilier cmtv I'riilii>, iiml Nil on 111 be <le- 

Itvered in every pari of tin* elty by Saturday*! post. If for 
nnv reoaou ft should he delayed* nr he delivered In poor 
road It ton, ■obaerlbeia will confer n favor upon the publlNuerti 
by cUinir (hem Inimetlinte notlee. 



A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY Q 

Truth., in its struggle for recognition, passes 
through four distinct stages. First, we say it is 
damnable, dangerous, disorderly, and will surely dis- 
rupt society. Second, we declare it is heretical, in- 
fidelic and contrary to the Bible. Third, we say it 
is really a matter of no importance one way or the 
other. Fourth, we aver that we always upheld and 
believed it. — Elbert Hubbard. 



+ <• + 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 

ACTIN< i UNDER what we were informed was a 
reasonable interpretation of the good roads law 
governing the Highway Commission, the Pacific 
Outlook last week suggested that a tactical error 
had been committed in calling the election on the 
bond issue for July 30 instead of awaiting the re- 
suil of the November election, when the successors 
of the present Board of Supervisors are to be chos- 
en. Hartley Shaw, chief deputy district attorney, in 
his opinion as to the relative functions of the High- 
way Commission and the Board of Supervisors ex- 
presi s himself in these words: "* * * it will 
appear that while the final decision upon all im- 
portant matters is with the Board of Supervisors, 
yet they must in all such matters either adopt or 
reject the proposals which the Highway Commis- 
sion makes to them." Further study of 
Good the matter leads to the conclusion that the 
Roads law has placed as nearly complete safe- 
guards alu att the vast fund which the vot- 
ers will he asked to appropriate for the construction 
of a system of durable highways as possible. While 
it is true that many persons yet remain in a frame 
of mind which may prompt them to -veto the issue 
of bonds, by reason of their lack of faith in the pro- 
fessed patriotism of all the members of the Board 
of Supervisors, we believe that if the Highway 



Commission and all other influential friends of the 
project u hi eh appears to In' on the e\ i' of ron sum illa- 
tion will place sufficient emphasis upon this im- 
portant feature of the law authorizing the issue- of 
bonds and the construction of the highway--., losing 
little time and effort in the unnecessary task of at- 
tempting to make converts to the good roads idea, 
the last and mosl serious obstacle will he surmount- 
ed or removed before the day on which the bond 
election is to he held. 

+ + + 
BROADLY SPEAKING, everybody wants to 
see a magnificent highway system in Los Angeles 
county built. Intelligent men of all classes long 
since have come to understand that as valuable an 
asset as any section can have is a permanent sys- 
tem of roads over which heavy loads of all kinds 
may be transported by team at any time of year. It 
is unnecessary, in our judgment, to devote any ma- 
terial portion of the energy that must be expended 
during the next two weeks or so to the campaign of 
education inaugurated by the Good Roads Associa- 
tion and the Highway Commission, to the work of 
convincing voters that Los Angeles county needs 
the proposed road improvement. The people are 
convinced of this, nineteen out of twenty of them. 
What they want to know is whether the great fund 
they are asked to set aside is to be honestly ad- 
ministered or not, provided they make 
Popular the appropriation. The law settles 
Curiosity this question ; therefore permit us to 
suggest that the mandates of and privi- 
leges under the law be explained as thoroughly as 
possible, in order that all doubts as to the manner 
in which the fund will be handled may be set at 
rest before the date of the election. The law un- 
doubtedly is the best that could possibly have been 
framed. It gives to the Highway Commission 
great power. It practically takes the administra- 
tion of the proposed fund out of the hands of the 
Board of Supervisors; at least it reduces to the 
minimum the possibilities of ''graft" of any kind. 
No law could have done it all. Much depends upon 
the character of "the men to whom its inforcement 
is intrusted. Fortunately we may repose the utmost 
confidence in the Highway Commission. If the 
members of the Board of Supervisors redeem their 
pledges, as made in their formal resolutions, the 
waste of money incidental to the construction of the 
roads will be inconsiderable. 

V V V 

A SPECIAL AGENT of the United States gov- 
ernment has been in Los Angeles for some time, 
unknown to most of the locai authorities, investi- 
gating the railroads for the purpose of determining 
whether enough evidence to warrant indictments 
for rebating and the giving of discriminatory freight 
rates can be procured. Some two months ago. it 
is said, information was transmitted to Attorney- 
General Bonaparte to the effect that certain rail- 
roads had been wilfully violating the federal stat- 
utes which forbid the giving of these discriminatory 



Pacific Outlook 



rates. The criminal operations of the railroads and 
those shippers which have profited thereby form 
one of those things which everybody knows but 
which nobody thus far appears to have been 
able to prove. With' the work of prosecution in- 
trusted to local officials it is but natural that some 
hesitancy to proceed against old-time friends may 

have been exhibited. But when a 
After the stranger is sent from Washington, an 
Rebaters officer who cares not whether the 

guilty be mien of high standing in so- 
cial or commercial circles or of just the common, 
everyday run of thieves, prospects assume a differ- 
ent aspect. What California stands in need of just 
now more than anything else is a thorough, fair 
and impartial investigation of the rebate iniquity by 
authorities who care not the snap of their fingers 
whether those found to be responsible for crime are 
the minor employes of the railroads or the head of- 
ficials and big shippers. The giving and the re- 
ceiving of discriminatory rates are equally criminal 
in the eyes of the law: the federal government and 
its honest officials will make no distinction between 
the grantor and the recipient of these competition- 
destroying privileges. This is well. This is right. 
This is justice. The receiver of stolen goods, know- 
ing that they have been stolen, is just as great a 
criminal at heart, and fortunately just as responsi- 
ble under the federal law, as the original thief. 

* ♦ ♦ 

WHY SHOULD REBATING and the accept- 
ance of rebates and discriminatory rates constitute 
a crime? Because by giving to a favored customer 
such rates for the transportation of the commodi- 
ties of trade and commerce the transportation com- 
panies place in the hands of such patron a power- 
ful weapon for discoui aging, if not annihilating', 
competition. If a merchant is permitted by the rail- 
road companies to ship his wares from the point of 
distribution into the city in which they are sold, 
at a rate of say one-half that quoted 

Death to to his smaller competitors, what is 
Competition the result? The cost of transporta- 
tation becoming a part of the cost 
of the commodities, the merchant securing the pre- 
ferred rate is enabled to undersell his competitor. 
What the effect of this system is upon trade it is 
easy to see. It is known that this practice has been 
engaged in by the railroad companies, and doubt- 
less is still in vogue. It is well that a movement 
has been instituted by the federal government to 
ascertain which roads have been granting rebates 
and what merchants have been benefiting thereby. 
The more quickly the guilty are located and pun- 
ished the more healthful will it be for the business 
of the community. 

* * * 

THE MORE DEEPLY C. C. Desmond, trustee 
of the Whittier Reform School, probes into the af- 
fairs of that establishment, the more shocking are 
the disclosures. It is not likely that the public has 
been made familiar with one-tenth of the iniquities 
practiced within that institution. But such dis- 
closures as have been made public thus far are of a 
character to disgust, shock, even appall all but the 
most hardened. But bad as the situation in the ad* 
ministrative department of the reformatory evi- 
dently is, the worst feature about the whole thing is 
that Mr. Desmond is compelled to make the fight 
for the purification of the moral atmosphere at 
Whittier alone and single-handed. Unfortunately 



for the state and for society, the other members of 
the board of trustees do not appear to have regarded 

their oaths of office as worthy of 
Stand by the importance which Mr. Desmond 
Desmond attaches to his own obligation. It 

is deeply to be deplored that they 
should be striving to bring his plans for the 
rehabilitation of the reformatory to naught. If 
the investigation had been actuated by stories of 
petty grafting, for which most public institutions 
in California have become notorious, their efforts 
to protect the superintendent and those under him 
might be accounted for ; but when it is known that 
Mr. Desmond has unearthed and has in his posses- 
sion evidence of most infamous and grossly immoral 
practices on the part of some of the attaches of the 
institution, the derelictions of his fellow trustees 
appear still more reprehensible. Every decent citi- 
zen should stand shoulder to shoulder with this 
fearless champion of chastity in our state institu- 
tions. Opposition to him in his righteous fight, 
whether such opposition be actuated by mercenary 
motives or not, is superlatively contemptible. 

* + * 

IT IS GRATIFYING to be able to state, upon 
the authority of Mr. Desmond, that the investiga-' 
tion is not to be hampered by interference from the 
local Republican machine. Through the Times Mr. 
Desmond has made the following statement to the 
public : "I have seen no evidence of such interfer- 
ence, nor do I expect to see it. I have not been ap- 
proached, either directly or indirectly, by anybody 

connected with the Southern Pacific 
No Political Railroad on this subject, and I have 
Interference failed to observe any such persons 

attempting to take a hand in the 
matter one way or the other. ■ The investigation 
is one in which every good citizen is concerned, and 
I am too well acquainted with the officials of the 
Southern Pacific here resident to suspect them of 
being anything but good citizens. There is no poli- 
tics in this matter. Politics cannot, by any pos- 
sibility, be made, to figure in it. It is a question of 
cleaning up a dirty mess and this I propose to do 
if it be in my power." 

♦ * ♦ 

THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK has refrained, 
hitherto, from indulging in comment upon the atti- 
tude of the socialists of Los Angeles in respect to 
the local ordinances regulating the deliverance of 
speeches upon the streets. In view of the fact that 
four women who insisted upon defying the law were 
taken to jail Tuesday night, where they are posing 
as "martyrs", in the first flush of their enthusiasm 
declaring that they will remain prisoners until the 
local laws shall have been adjudged unconstitu- 
tional (.according to a newspaper report of the in- 
cident), and in view of the further fact that law- 
breakers of this particular stripe are being warmly 
defended in their attitude by certain influences, it 
will be well if the matter be threshed out now, 
rather than: to postpone action indefinitely. It is 

time that a little more sanity were 

"Martyrs" exhibited by those advocates of 

and the Law "free speech" who would place the 

law at naught. If these "martyrs" 
seriously intend to test the ordinance in the courts, 
carrying it to the court of last resort, well and good ; 
but if they are simply seeking for notoriety, little 
sympathy should be wasted on them. The laws 
are made for all classes, and they are made to be 



Pacific Outlook 



they remain upon the books 
ihey should be inforced. Because the violator of 
■ unpunished, as is frequent- 
ly th follow that the viol 
other laws be privileged t" disregard them 
with impunity. The laws prohibiting speaking on 
in the |)iil>lii- parks may be bad, as 
many law t affect the prin- 
ciple that all laws should be honored in their ob- 
servance by men and women who profess to be law- 
abiding persons. We have little sympathy for per- 
any law, unless such violation be 
solely for the purpose of testing the constitutional- 
ity of some law in the highest court. 
♦ + + 
WHILE WE BELIEVE the police department 
i- to he commended for its effort to inforce the ordi- 
nance respecting public speaking, may we he par- 
doned for once more expressing the wish that the 
department might he equally as active in its in- 
forcement of certain state laws the validity of which 
- not appear to have been brought into question? 
We refer specifically to those sections of the 
statutes which make the ownership and the conduct 
of houses of prostitution illegal. Mayor Harper, 
Chief Kern. District Attorney Fredericks — yes, 
practically everybody in Los Vngeles — knows that 
numerous institutions of this kind are permitted to 
thrive in this city under the pro- 
Favorites teeting wing of the authorities. To 
and the Law inforce, most rigidly, the local ordi- 
nances prohibiting speech-making- 
under certain circumstances is. as we have said, 
highly commendable on the part of the police de- 
partment. To inforce the state laws, and especially 
those bearing- upon such an iniquity as houses of 
prostitution, is a thousand-fold more commendable. 
It is the inforcement of the laws against the pooi 
and the non-inforcement of those against the rich 
and politically powerful that helps to make social- 
ists and anarchists of unthinking men and women. 
In the particular instance under discussion, we be- 
lieve the police department should inforce the law 
respecting- public speaking: but just as rigidly 
should it compel the owners and proprietors of 
houses of ill-fame to abide by the law which declares 
that they shall not transact their infamous business. 
♦ ,♦ ♦ 
WHAT DISGRACE will attach to the name of 
Los Angeles, which is advertised from one end of 
the land to the other as the best home town in Amer- 
ica (as in many respects it is), if the time ever come 
wdien the work of purifying the cit) r , of ridding it of 
the infamies to which we have again directed atten- 
tion, after having been studiously neglected by the 
local public officials sworn to inforce the laws im- 
partially, to the best of their ability, shall be under- 
taken by a non-resident! And yet that is exactly 
wdiat probably will happen. Our own Mayor Har- 
per, our own District Attorney Fredericks, our own 
Chief of Police Kern, our own Police Commission 
with its professional politicians and good citizens — 
all these appear to be suffering 
Non-resident from chronic indisposition to take 
and the Law the initiative in action looking to- 
ward the fulfillment of their oaths 
of office regarding the mandates of the law relative 
to the infamies which exist almost under their very 
noses. But Rudolph Spreckels has said: 71 have re- 
ceived the strongest assurance from public-spirited 
citizens of New York, Philadelphia, Denver and 
Los Angeles that if I will come to those cities, 



bringing the benefit of m\ experience in San Fran- 

i, financial support for investigation ami pr 
CUtions there will be ready. When they havi 

ed and the work here is ended. I will go." Isn't 
it a crying shame that so little of the spirit of self- 
help is in evidence in official circles in Los An- 

- ? What a commentary on the \ .united spirit of 
civic righteousness that we should be placed in a 
position where we should virtually seek the activi- 
ties of a man like Mr. Spreckels. a non resident, in 
inaugurating the processes of purging which our 
own officials have so wantonly neglected! 

a|a a|a afa 

ABOUT A MONTH SINAI', a New < Irleans pa- 
per, the Daily States, inaugurated a campaign of 
resistance to the process of subordinating state 
universities to private interests. Desultory firing 
has been heard all along the newspaper line for 
some time past, but the New Orleans paper is the 
first, so far as we are able to learn, which has at- 
tempted to organize the press and public sentiment 
against the Carnegieization of the universities sup- 
ported by the various states of the Union, which 
it characterizes as "a pernicious scheme to under- 
mine the very foundations of higher education in 
the country". The Daily States finds its text in a 
legislative measure intended to permit the Louis- 
iana State University to participate in the Carnegie 

fund to retire and pension 

The Process of teachers who have served twen- 

"Carnegieization" ty-five years. It declares that 

the conditions attached to the 
privilege of participation in this fund are such as to 
revolutionize the principles upon which state uni- 
versities are maintained and operated. "The uni- 
versities virtually remain state universities only 
in so far as that the state m'ust pay their expenses 
out of the people's tax money, while the state prac- 
tically surrenders control of them and accepts the 
'principles of control contained in the conditions by 
which the institutions become beneficiaries of the 
Carnegie donation." So heedless of the possible 
consequences of such action on their part have the 
American people become that they have been rush- 
ing pell mell to get possession of the Carnegie mil- 
lions ini order that they may be saved the inconse- 
quential expense of equipping and maintaining in- 
stitutions whose foundation and support should be 
a popular delight and pride. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
WHILE THE ATTITUDE of the New Orleans 
newspaper may appear to some, at first thought, to 
be unnecessarily bellicose, the principle actuating 
it is of the highest and most patriotic. Knowing, as 
all Americans know, the source of the vast wealth 
of Andrew Carnegie : realizing that it has been 
made possible largely through the corruption of 
the Congress and bureaus of government having in 
charge the construction of battleships in the United 
States navy, it is hardly to be wondered at that 
any honest, proud and courageous American citizen 
should resent seeing his city or state placed in the 
position of accepting alms from one whose wealth 
has been derived from the source whence the Car- 
negie millions have come. When a state surrenders 
to the demand of a holder of wealth, taken in the 
first instance from the people them- 
Humiliating selves, by those devious processes 
Surrender which have made possible our Car- 
negies, our Rockefellers and our Har- 
rimans, that its educational institutions mav benefit 
from such largess, the time has come when the 



6 



Pacific Outlook 



people should hang their heads in humiliation and 
shame. How many of us have stopped to reflect 
upon the character of instruction which may follow 
if the educational institutions of our states are to 
lean upon Carnegie rather than upon the strong 
protecting arms of the states themselves? What 
are the doctrines we may fairly expect to see pro- 
mulgated from the chairs of political economy, for 
example, when we find that the instructors in this 
department are fondly anticipating the time when, 
their usefulness to the state having been arbitrarily 
terminated by statute, they may live in retirement 
on funds which are the fruit of a stupendous raid 
upon the people's treasury, conducted along lines 
which are all too common even in this day? 

* + * 

THE LAIRD of Skibo may be suffering from the 
pricks of a conscience grown vigorous as he ap- 
proaches that time when he must give his grand 
final accounting of what 'he probably regards as 
his stewardship. If that be true ; if, before that final 
accounting, he wants to rid himself of the weight 
of his ill-gotten wealth, let him contribute his mil- 
lions—or such share of them as he honestly be- 
lieves to have been sinfully wrung from the people— 
into the federal "conscience fund", from which they 
may be disbursed among the whole people in equity. 
By adopting this method of returning to the people 
that which was and is theirs by right he will more 

nearly approach an atonement for the 

The Better iniquity of the armor-plate frauds 

Method than by doling 'his fortune out, a few 

thousand at a time, making an ever- 
lasting monument to his name and fame — such 
fame as future generations shall accord him — a con- 
sideration for each "gift". Such delight as he may 
now take in, seeing states and cities grovel at his 
feet for the sake of securing a miserable handful 
of literally filthy lucre,, such pleasure as may accrue 
to him through the vision of stately monuments to 
his canny gift of converting national wealth into 
private fortune, cannot compare with the profound 
sense of satisfaction that would fill his heart after 
complete reparation^- the return of the unfairly se- 
cured portion of his fortune to the source from 
which it came, the nation, and renunciation of all 
claim to undying fame in the form of "Carnegie'^ 
libraries, "Carnegie" institutions and "Carnegie" 
endowments of various kinds. 

V *F V 

LOUISIANA GLORIES in the fact that it once 
spurned a donation of twenty-five thousand dollars 
made to its state university by the Louisiana State 
Lottery Company at a time when that institution, 
and even the state, were in much greater need than 
now. The precedent then and thus established un- 
doubtedly will be the guide in considering the Car- 
negie offer and future "donations" of a kindred 
character. By such a course she will put to shame 
many other states of much greater wealth ; she will 
establish a new definition for the term "Southern 

honor". This Louisiana editor who has 
Shoals taken up the cudgel in defense of state 
Ahead honor probably discerns the menace in the 

proposed. Carnegie gift to the Louisiana 
State University no more clearly than do thousands 
of others, but he is brave enough to admit the dis- 
grace of state mendicancy and the appeal to a finan- 
cial pirate, and possessed of sufficient sagacity and 



perspicuity to foresee demoralization and de- 
bauchery of public sentiment and the ultimate un- 
doing of democracy in the subordination of educa- 
tional institutions to the whims and caprices of in- 
dividual instructors who, with their eyes on old-age 
pensions, may feel impelled to honor the memory of 
a self-constituted trustee of what is rightly a part 
of the public treasury. 

* * * 

IN LAST WEEK'S issue of the Outlook (New 
York) Dr. Samuel J. Barrows, president of the In- 
ternational Prison Commission, in an article en- 
titled "The Temperance Tidal Wave", justifies ap- 
plying this term to the present temperance move- 
ment : "It is a form of social and moral energy," 
he declares, "which registers itself just as certainly 
as the ocean wave, the swift wind, the changing 
temperature, can write their .autographs in a lan- 
guage which the trained observer can read. It is a 
manifestation of public opinion which is registering 
itself in words, deeds and tendencies." For the first 
time in American history the saloon finds itself in 
a position where it is compelled to plead for mercy, 
for its very life, before the final decree 
Temperance against it has been entered. No mat- 
Tidal Wave ter what one may think of the drink- 
ing of intoxicants as a purely moral 
question, there is a great unanimity on one point, 
namely, that the saloon is so great a menace to the 
peace, the health and the safety of humanity that 
humanity has a moral and legal right to suppress it, 
if it will. Even the brewers of beer — that innocuous 
beverage, as they declare it to be — have been com- 
pelled, as a measure of defense for their own par- 
ticular industry, to admit that the sale and con- 
sumption of spirituous liquors is fraught with dan- 
ger. That the public has the right to legislate 
against the sale of liquor for beverage purposes no 
well-informed man will deny; and that the people 
are preparing to avail themselves of this privilege, 
from one end of the country to the other, now ap- 
pears to be a fact. 

* * * 

THE GREAT MAJORITY of people seem 
agreed on one point — that the influence of the saloon 
in politics, as well as upon, the health and prosperity 
of the masses, must be reduced to that point where 
it will be a relatively inconsiderable danger, if not 
entirely annihilated. But it is the solution of the 
problem which has evoked much discord. The 
saloon need not be endured, and it can be cured. 
But how? In discussing Dr. Barrows's paper edi- 
torially the Outlook says : "In the first place, what- 
ever one may think of drinking as a moral ques- 
tion, one cannot escape the fact that the saloon is 
manifestly so great a source of danger that the 
people have the right to direct special legislation 
against it. In the second place, the most effective 
method adopted for minimizing the social dangers 
of the saloon in America has been shown to be 

local option. In the third place, in 
Argument for those states in which whole corn- 
Local Option munities of considerable importance 

are traditionally and persistently op- 
posed to no-license, state prohibition has been far 
from completely effective and in some cases has 
worked actual injury. In the fourth place, in those 
states in which, through local option, the constituent 
communities have come with practical unanimity to 
approve of no-license, so that the majority of the 



Pacific Outlook 



- virtually the sum of the majorities 
in the several communities, state prohibition is on 
a differei g and may be effective." It is 

deplorable, l>ut apparently true— if the information 
received from - which, as states, 

have adopted prohibition, is reliable — that in such 
- prohibition does no) always prohibit ; and it 
[ually true that in the cases of states where, 
through local option, almost every community in 
the state has decided that no liquor shall be 
the ideal condition has been approximated. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE MOST PRACTICAL efforts which have 
ever been put forth by the federal government for 
the assistance of labor are to he found in the work 
secretary Straus in his organization of endeavor 
t" spread labor from points where the demand for it 
ighl to places where it is greatly needed. This 
is the first organized effort, private or public, to 
provide for the demand for lahor in different sec- 
tions of the country in different seasons. A bureau 

under the charge of T. V. Powderly lias been estab- 

lisheil in Chicago for the purpose of concentrating 
the supply of laboring men for the harvesting sea- 
son in the Middle West in particular. The lack of 
lahor of this character during this period has been, 
in the past, one of the greatest obstacles to the com- 
plete success of agriculture in the 
A Double great Mississippi basin. Much has 
Benefit been lost to the husbandman through 
the failure to obtain sufficient help 
during this critical period. AVhat has been lost in 
this way may be estimated when it is stated authori- 
tatively that in one western state alone the demand 
for farm hands exceeded the supply last year by 
21.000 hands. The government has set its hand to 
the task of supplying this demand, not for the year 
1908 alone, but for an indefinite period. The ser- 
vice to be performed will be of inestimable value to 
hundreds of thousands of farmers throughout the 
greater portion of the agricultural districts of the 
country. Fortunately the plan contemplates the 
placing of labor of all kinds, including domestic ser- 
vice. The relief of congested districts, such as the 
great cities of the East, cannot fail to be great; and 
the benefit to the inhabitants of the Middle West 
will be correspondingly great. The federal govern- 
ment has never undertaken a more beneficent pro- 
ject. 

•fr <• * 

ONE OF THE BIG insurance companies has an- 
nounced that it soon will begin the erection of a 
building in New York which, from the street to the 
top of the flagstaff, will be more than a thousand 
feet high. Twenty-five years ago, when the World 
building — twenty-three stories high, if our memory 
serves us correctly — was completed, it took its place 

as the chief architectural wonder of 

Approaching the world, so far as altitude was 

the Limit concerned. But besides the modern 

high edifices in the metropolis the 
World building is a pygmy. The Singer building 
has fifteen miles of steam and water piping and a 
floor area of 411,000 square feet, or approximately 
nine and one-half acres. The Metropolitan building 
has a floor area of a million square feet, or about 
twenty-five acres. It will be interesting to learn 
two things — the floor area, etc., etc., of the pro- 
posed thousand-foot building, and the height of the 
structure which inevitably must go the new marvel 
"one better". 



The Injunction PlanK at Chicago 

i ml) our plank in the Republican platform caused 
a long and serious controversy in the resolutions 

committee, and this plank is one which has no 
relation to party differences and which i- a difficult 
thing to deal with as a popular issue. The plank 
ill question has to ,],, with the defining or limiting 
of the power of the federal courts to issue writ-- of 
injunction. The 1 'resident, as is well known, has 
repeatedly asked Congress to pass an act that would 
prevent t lie undue and arbitrary use of the powi 
injunction, while nol in any way impairing the nor- 
mal authority of the courts. The plank as it Si 1 

in the original draft of the platform was a mild one 
which good lawyers anil judges declared tvas in no 
way objectionable. Hut the so-called "conserva- 
tives" in the convention had been instructed to the 
effect that the judiciary of America is so sacred a 
thing that it is not only never to be criticised, but 
that it is even treasonable to suggest modifications 
of rules of court procedure. 

The demand for some regulation of the use of 
injunctions comes almost wholly from the leaders 
of^ organized labor, says the Review of Reviews. 
We should not have 'heard of any objection to the 
President's proposal for a better regulation of the 
methods of procedure in the issuance of injunction 
writs but for the intensely bitter and persistent 
work of an important organization of manufacturers 
which has undertaken to exterminate organized 
labor altogether. The President's position was the 
moderate, just, and fair one as between the contend- 
ing interests. Every kind of pressure was used to 
secure his consent, and Mr. Taft's, to the dropping 
of the subject from the platform. But they refused 
to yield. The plank as accepted by him did not go 
nearly as far as the labor men would 'have wished, 
yet they would doubtless have accepted it under the 
circumstances. The Manufacturers' Association 
was determined that the platform should contain 
no allusion whatever to the subject. Neither of 
these two parties in interest belonged to the one 
great political organization or to the other; and the 
convention should not have permitted them to force 
the injunction question into undue prominence. A 
compromise was finally agreed upon and accepted 
by the platform committee, the Administration 
leaders at Washington, and the convention itself. 

* + * 

Explicit Obedience 

Mr. Shonts, the former chairman of the Panama 
Canal Commission, has been pointing out the al- 
most incredible difficulties of handling the West 
Indian blacks who are doing the manual toil of the 
canal. 

Senator Millard, he says, was sitting on the deck 
of the steamer Havana, watching the unloading of a 
heavy piece of machinery from "the hold of the ves- 
sel. The tackle got caught in the rigging of the 
deck above; the foreman in charge of the gang of 
laborers sent one of them to free the tackle. The 
laborer went, and did what he was told to do. The 
foreman missed him a few minutes later, and, look- 
ing around for the man, discovered him sitting 
peacefully at the spot to which he had been sent. 

"What are you doing there?" yelled the foreman. 

"You told me to come here, sah." 

"Well, why didn't you come back?" 

"You didn't tell me to come back, sah." 



Pacific Outlook 




BY DOROTHY RUSSELL LEWIS 



IN THE midst of the cosmos, a little story, 
as ancient as the Ancient of Days, had 
waited since the beginning to be born. It 
was as old as life and as young as love, and as true 
as Truth itself. Thousands of years rolled' by and 
still none heeded the little story, nor heard its word- 
less cry to be liberated from nonexistence, that it 
might do its allotted work in the world. 

At length, one who had suffered much and never 
ceased to smile heard in the deeps of his own heart 
the story's pleading. Then, amid the chaos of pov- 
erty and the throes of heart-anguish, in the hush of 
renunciation, the story came into being. It emerged 
from formlessness into light ; and because the un- 
conscious world had been in sore need of it, and be- 
cause it had gathered momentum through the ages, 
its light was not hid, for there were those who saw 
it even before it shone. 

The story was published in a magazine. All who 
had eyes might see; all who had ears might hear. 
And some both saw and heard. 

A man who had toiled unremittingly without re- 
ward, and whose patience was well-nigh spent, read 
the story and took heart. Stiffening his back to the 
load, he renewed his gigantic efforts, the story's 
message ringing in his ears, — and lo, that for which 
he had labored became clear. And the man's name 
sounded like a trumpet note throughout two con- 
tinents, and people said, "He is the inventor- of the 
decade." 

A woman, whose beauty shone through grief's 
traces like, evening's first star through the gather- 
ing dusk, sent the story to one she loved, and prayed 
that he might understand. And he came and kissed 
away her tears, murmuring, "Forgive me, dear; I 
never knew before. We will build anew." 

A bundle of magazines was sent to a prison. 
There a sinner, steeped in degradation, read the 
story. And because its every word breathed abund- 
ant hope for such as he, he thought much and gave 
it to his fellow prisoners that they might read. Some 
scoffed ; but one who was soon to die fed his fam- 
ished soul upon its promise and met his end smiling. 
Another pondered long over the story. He had 
been convicted of a crime of which die was innocent, 
and through all the years of his imprisonment the 
impulse of revenge had gnawed within him. Now' 
that liberty was near at hand an evil joy possessed 
him, for he thought' to repay the world that had 



tortured him by consecrating the remnant of his 
life to the powers of sin. But the seeds of love in 
the little story fell even upon such rough ground 
as this. For the first time in years, the man wept as 
he read. The hard-wrung drops carried with them 
his heart's bitterness. The regenerating had begun. 

A sufferer read the story and thanked God. For, 
thought she, "Only through such pain as mine could 
this message have reached the world.," Even as the 
story's sweetness penetrated her thoughts, its 
power altered her wasted body. Once more God 
had worked a miracle. 

Thus it was that this infinite idea, alive though 
unperceived through all eternity, accomplished its 
mission on earth. The story passed from lip to lip 
and from heart to heart. Long after every copy of 
the magazine in which it had been published had 
been destroyed, the story was still a living, loving, 
active power for good. As generation after genera- 
tion passed, its simple truths found their way into 
the laws of the kingdoms of earth, exerted their 
silent influence over civil and moral codes, and revo- 
lutionized thousands of lives. It was translated into 
every known language, until there was not a nation 
under the sun which had not smiled at its joy, mar- 
velled at its might, and worshipped it's wisdom. It 
sweetened life and purified love the world over. 

And what of him through whom it had come? 
Before the publication of the story which he had 
written with a pen dipped in his heart's blood, his 
dead body was found in the attic in which he had 
led a wretched exstence. "Death from starvation" 
was the coroner's verdict. 

Last night I had a dream. I, with many others, 
stood in green pastures beside still waters. But 
those who were with me heeded me not, for all eyes 
were fixed upon one who, with holy peace writ upon 
his face, was passing through that region for the 
first time. And someone came to meet him, and 
taking him by the hand led him away through a 
beautiful valley and across a shining river. We 
watched them go until they passed through a gate- 
way out of our sight. Then the air was filled with 
such a sweetness of sound as I had never dreamed 
of, — rejoicing embodied in melody so marvellous 
that I fell upon my knees and wept. And when I 
arose, I asked of those about me, "Who was he ?" 
And they answered very tenderly, "He was the au- 
thor of the story." 



Pacific Outlook 



A PanicKy Atmosphere 

a man in Garvanza. "The 

ntry! What country arc \.>u talking about? 

This country? This country won't last six months 

- <r." 

know tlii> country won't las 

?" inquired a man in the crowd. 

"Hmu do I know it? Why. sir. it's in the air. 

premonitory symptoms arc all around thicket 

than lie. i- kitten. Coming events cast 

their shadows before. We are on the verge of an- 

r financial panic which will rattle us from cen- 
ter to circumferen. 

"tan yon see any particular signs of another 
panic?" 

• of 'cm. -ir. There is a financial stringency 
in the money market which. I venture to say, might 
he appreciated even In- you. Have you not noticed 
it?" 

"\. 't particularly — no." 

particularly! Bah! Let me tell you. sir. 1 

can bring this fact home to you forcibly — forcibly. 

sir: or 1 am sadly mistaken. 1 can prove it to you 

before the whole crowd." 

"Well, go ahead ami prove it. I'm not hindering 

"Very well. sir. Xow. then, didn't you lend me 
a dollar a couple of months ago?" 

"Yes, I believe I did." 

"Can you let me have another today?" 

"I would, but — " 

"That's it — that's it ! You're going; to refuse: and 
right here, before all these bystanders, you tacitly 
admit that a financial stringency prevents me from 
paying you the one loan or even negotiating an- 
other. If the state of the financial atmosphere isn't 
panicky, I don't know what you would call it." 
* + + 
Ancestry of PicKpocKets 

The pickpocket, though he has had many names, 
has always been a prominent member of the crim- 
inal fraternity. In the days of Queen Bess and her 
Stuart successors purses were carried at the side 
banging down from the girdle, and the connection 
being easily cut they formed tempting booty for 
the "cutpurses," as they were commonly called. 

The skilful rascals who did the trick, says the 
London Globe, were also known as "foists," or 
"nips," while the purse was a "bung," and the knife 
with which it was cut was called a "cuttle." "Cut- 
tle" comes from a Latin word for knife, from which 
same root is derived the modern cutlass. The 
"nip's" knife was short, strong and crooked, and on 
his thumb the operator wore a horn thimble. 

The pickpockets of these times did not lack for 
impudence. Churches and theatres seem to have 
been favorite places for the operation of the frater- 
nity. A divine of Charles I.'s time in the course of 
a sermon took occasion to remark upon the im- 
pudence of "those thieves who durst cut purses in 
prayer time in the King's Cbappell, his majestie be- 
ing present and under the cloth of state." The mid- 
dle walk of old St. Paul's Cathedral was another 
favorite resort of pickpockets. Up and down the 
Splendid nave of the fine old church, which per- 
ished in the great fire of London, passed a constant 
stream of people. No regard whatever was paid 
to the sacred character of the building. 

At the theatres, where the accommodation was 
very rough and the people stood or sat crowded to- 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 

Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

Can you imagine [| !c future of l os Angeles? It 
day .t^.ooo nearer a city of a million popula- 
tion than it was There i> no question 
of its continuous growth. If you do have the i 

of imagination to !>»>k into the future you -':, 

■his: 
"Twer day the school board of 

Los * ity, having sold tin: old Spring Street 

school lot on the corner of Spring and Second 

is (the present site of the Bryson Buildil 
purchased a lot with tao feet fronting on Sp 

i .-in equal one on Broadway (then Fort 

Street) for $I2,5O0. Mercantile Place now runs 
through i!e propertj The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is too 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or .111 average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial, I. os Angeles Times, June I. 1008. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE- 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



Phone F 4146- Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 

W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Tel. E-1467 
Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



gether, the light fingered fraternity again found a 
favorable field for business. When one of these 
gentry w.as caught in the act it was customary to 
tie him to a post on. the stage so that all might see 
and be familiar with his face. In country towns 
pickpockets and petty thieves detected in their vil- 
lainy were publicly whipped and then driven out of 
the place. 

There was no lack of boldness on the part of Eng- 
lish thieves, whether they "worked" in the streets 
of London or infested the highways — "high law- 
yers" these were called — in the open country; but 
few of these rascals equalled in impudence a pick- 
pocket who was caught in the famous fair of St. 
Germain at Paris in 1698. 

This gentleman, in all the bravery of the most 
fashionable attire, came into the fair at night at- 
tended by four lackeys dressed in handsome liveries. 
But notwithstanding his sartorial splendor the 
knave was detected in the practice of pocket pick- 
ing; his "lackeys" drew their swords in his defence, 
but in vain, for this early member of the "swell 
mob" was taken and delivered into the hands of 
justice, which, says the narrator rather grimly, "is 
here sudden and no jest." . 

In the time of Queen Anne and the Georges the 
London pickpocket was known as a "diver." The 
hanging purse had gone out of fashion and could 
therefore no longer be cut. The pickpocket had to 
resort to the more delicate operation of searching 
the victim's pocket for the purse or other possible 
plunder, and this was aptly termed "diving." A 
light fingered character in the "Beggar's Opera" was 
called Jimmy Diver., Gay describes the diving 
process : 

Here dives the skulking thief, with practis'd sleight, 
And unfelt fingers make thy pocket light; 
Where's now thy watch? With all its trinkets, flown; 
And t'hy late snuffbox is no more thy own. 

But if the rascal were caught then he was dragged 
to the pump and well soused. 

The "diver" in later days has been, known, with 
equal appropriateness, as the 'dip" or "dipper." 
Some forty years or so ago the well known Vance 
used to sing a once popular song called "The Chick- 
aleary Bloke," and in this the hero says : 

Off to Paris I shall go to show a thyig or two 
To the dipping blokes wot hangs about the cafes. 

Names change, but the pickpocket remains and 
pursues his business with a skill and dexterity 
which if directed into more honorable channels 
would assuredly earn an. adequate as well as a safe 
reward. 

Dentistry in China 

Right in front of us on the street doctor's table is 
a small heap of human teeth, says a contributor to 
the North China Daily News. A patient came up 
to the doctor. On being asked what he wanted he 
replied simply by opening his mouth to the very 
widest extent. It was seen that his four upper teeth 
were wanting. 

Measuring the cavity in the jaw, the tooth ped- 
dler carefully selected from the heap the four teeth 
that would exactly fit it. He then drilled a hole in 
them longitudinally and inserted a bit of wire to 
bind them to each other. 

The ends of the wire were next inserted in holes 
on each side of the cavity and at once the chasm 
disappeared. 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monihly 

We can put you up a home in almost any part of 
the city — from Boyle Heights to the Westlake Dis- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Harvey McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



J 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 
R ^g^ B 


S 
1 
D 


i MINES So FARISH 

i REAL ESTATE AGENTS 


s 
1 

N 


E 
N 

T 




E 

s 
s 


PROPERTIES 



XUnfcevbill Sbirt Go. 



MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SHirts 



Phone F 6715 



4i4i4 SoutH Broad-way 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets.. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 
ROBERT MADISON. Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



IVe 


Handle 


{Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loa- t s, Investments, 
Insurance 






GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

Real Estate 






Phone F 1466 






902 Security Bldg., Los Angeles 


Col. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 




Till-. RE( ile war between 

the I'niti ml Japan brings to mind 

an incident in which the "little brown men" 
and ■ nr navj once participated. The 

• i, when the United States 
busy with the Southcn Confederacy. It 
this fact that tend r the Japanese af- 

fair with obscurity, and to render it comparatively 
Ejnificant: so that very few people are convers- 
ant with the naval battle that sent two of the Mi- 
ips to tin- bottom of the ocean and hurled 
his fortifications into the air like children's play- 
thin. 

The United Si n frigate Wyoming- was 

the instrument that in tie hands of Providence, and 
t. McDougal, taught the Xipponites a lesson 
that seems to have been Forgotten. The Wyoming 
was cruising in Asiatic waters for the purpose of 
ing after Confederate privateers and carried 
11-inch Dahlgren guns and four 32-potmders. 
She was manned by 160 -run. At that time the 
Japanese were bitter against all foreigners, and the 
Mikado issued an order expelling everybody who 
did not belong there from his little domain. In at- 
tempting to carry out this policy, their initiatory 
move was to fortify the bluffs on each side of the 
western entrance to the sea known as the "Japanese 
Mediterranean*. 

These bluffs were dignified with the appellation 
of the "Gibraltar of the Japanese Mediterranean". 
The channel between them is about three miles 
long and a mile and a half wide. On the blufifs 
commanding this channel the Japanese had erected 
seven batteries consisting of 32, 24 and 12-pound 
guns of the most m'odern type at that time. In ad- 
dition to these they had three ships of war in the 
vicinity — the Lancefield, Lanark and the bark Dan- 
iel Webster, all provided with 24-pounders. 

The first American ship to call down the wrath 
of the Japanese was the steamer Pembroke, which, 
unconscious of any danger, entered the narrow pas- 
sage on June 23, bound for Nagasaki. She was fired 
upon both by land and ship batteries, and narrowly 
escaped being' sunk before she could effect a retreat. 

A few days after the Pembroke affair a French 
dispatch boat was the victim of a similar cowardly 
attack, was nearly sunk and a number of her men 
killed. A Dutch cruiser that ventured into the 
strait to investigate the matter was riddled with 
shot, and came near going to the bottom ; but finally 
escaped, after being hit thirty times. 

Following the Dutchman, a French gunboat with 
more temerity than discretion got within range of 
the batteries of the venomous little Japanese and 
was sunk. 

But Capt. McDougal, with the Wyoming, was 
in the neighborhood, ami the American commander 
was in anything but a good humor when 'he heard 
of the hilarious time the Japanese were having with 
foreign vessels. Pie decided, notwithstanding he 
was about ready to sail for home, to visit the lo- 
cality. 

lie dropped anchor, according to Maclay, in his 
History of the American Navy, at the eastern end 
of the straits, on the evening of July IS, having first 



learned that the Lancefield drew no more \. 
than his own ship. Early the nexl morning the 
Wyoming rounded a point of land, wh ii the 

batteries in her. the first shot striking 

the ship just above the engine-room, cutting away 
some rigging — ample evidence of tin | of 

the Japanese gunners. Making no reply to this, the 

Wyoming steamed on till she rounded ano 

promontory, when she came within full sight of the 
town .nnl within long range of the batteries and the 
Japanese warships. 

The shrewd American commander had noticed a 
line of stakes driven in the mud. evidently marking 
the edge of the main channel. Rightly guessing 
that the enemy had long before got the precise 
range of this waterway, McDougal ordered his pi- 
lots to take the ship toward the northern shore, 
close under the batteries on that side. 

The Daniel Webster was anchored close to the 
town, the Lanark about 50 yards beyond and a 
length ahead, and near her was the Lancefield. All 
these vessels were rigged with kedge anchors and 
grappling anchors at their yard arms, ready to close 
on the Wyoming and carry her by boarding. Their 
decks were covered with men shouting and defying 
the Americans to come on. Making directly for 
these vessels, McDougal shook out his colors, but 
reserved his fire, intending to attack the vessels 
first, and give 'his attention to the batteries after- 
ward. The sight of the American flag seemed to 
act like oil on fire, for now the Japanese opened fire 
from other batteries with savage ferocity. 

McDougal's shift from the main channel some- 
what disconcerted their plans, as was seen by the 
fact that most of their shots took effect in the Wy- 
oming's rigging. 

Observing a good opportunity to deliver a few 
blows. McDougal opened with his pivot and star- 
board guns, and with such effect that one battery 
was torn to pieces and silenced at the first broad- 
side. 

Keeping steadily on for the ships, the Wyoming, 
when nearly abreast of the squadron, was fired upon 
by the Daniel Webster, by which two men were 
killed. About the same time a shot from one of the 
batteries killed a marine. 

The Americans were now firing from every gun 
in the ship, and -with splendid effect, as was shown 
by the loads of earth and broken gun mountings 
that were hurled into the air. Aided by the strong 
tide, the Wyoming swiftly passed down the straits, 
so that the Japanese gunners, although firing with 
admirable rapidity, could discharge no more than 
three broadsides. One of their shells killed all the 
crew of the forward 32-pounder except three men. 

The Wyoming had now passed the ships, which 
site rounded with the intention of making a target 
of them, but at this critical juncture she ran 
aground, where six batteries in the squadron could 
concentrate their fire upon her, and for a moment it 
looked very much like defeat. The Lancefield was 
now observed to ship her cable and steam over to 
the northern shore, probably with the view of gath- 
ering headway for ramming the helpless American. 
Realizing the danger, McDougal directed all his 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



attention to the steamer, hoping to disable her be- 
fore she could do the threatened mischief. 

Meantime the Wyoming's engines had been re- 
versed,, and after a powerful effort, she was backed 
clear of the mud into deep water. Maneuvering as 
well as the five-knot current and sunken rocks 
would admit of, McDougal got his two pivot guns 
into play on the Lancefield, and soon 11-inch shells 
were doing their awful work on the hull of the 
steamer. The second carefully aimed shell from 
the forward pivot gun crashed through the Lance- 
field one foot above the water line, pierced the 
boiler and came out on the other side, tearing a 
great hole in the hull. As if not satisfied with the 
work, the shell speed over the water, and exploded 
in the town, a quarter of a mile away. 

In an instant the Lancefield was enveloped in a 
mass of steam, smoke, flames and cinders. Scores 
of men threw themselves into the sea. Two more 
shells were then sent into the Lancefield to insure 
her destruction. The pivot guns were then turned 
on the Daniel Webster, which ship had been keep- 
ing up a destructive fire. ' A few well-directed shells 
settled her fate, and she followed the Lancefield to 
the bottom. 

McDougal was not able to devote his entire at- 
tention to the shore batteries. He deliberately re- 
traced his course through the straits, keeping up a 
most effective fire, so much so that although greatly 
exposed, 'his vessel was scarcely injured. 

After passing the last battery, and getting be- 
yond the reach of the Japanese guns, the Wyoming 
came to, and the men had time to count their losses. 
The action had lasted just one hour and ten min- 
uets, in which the Wyoming has been struck more 
than twenty times, ten shots having pierced her 
hull. The ship 'had fired fifty-five rounds, or nearly 
one for every minute of the action. Six men were 
killed and four wounded. Four days later the 
French frigate Semiramis and the gunboat Tan- 
crede entered the straits and after landing a detach- 
ment of 250 men captured the batteries. 

Thus one American vessel defeated a squadron 
of three Japanese .warships, destroyed or silenced 
seven of their most formidable land batteries, and 
steamed triumphantly through their vaunted "Gib- 
raltar of the Japanese Mediterranean". 

'What Is Opium? 

You hear a good deal about the habit the Chinese 
have of smoking opium, but do you know exactly 
what opium is? It is nothing but the dried juice 
of the white poppy, a flower that grows wild in 
many parts of Asia and is also cultivated there. A 
few days after the flowers have fallen off the plants 
men go through the fields, in the afternoon, and 
make little cuts in the poppy head. Out of these 
cuts a milky juice oozes, which dries into a brown, 
sticky paste. Every morning the men go through 
the fields again and scrape off this paste, which they 
put into jars. Later on it is made into half-pound 
balls and then packed for shipment. In China it 
is most used for smoking, either with tobacco or 
pure. In this country and in Europe it is used 
chiefly for making laudanum and paragoric. Laud- 
anum is nothing but opium dissolved in alcohol ; 
paragoric is a mixture of opium, camphor, alcohol, 
honey and some other things. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. NATHANSON 

LADIES' TAILOR 

and 

HABIT MAKER 

...HigHest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 
21€> Mercantile Place 











oo 


0m 


! We 






i Pay 




aHA>^a 


' *t rJ3# l C2 


Special 




Attention 






' To 




*3lifl^^^™ — *^^^^^&^^i'^/^7^'W 


Our 




OPTICAL DEPAR1 


rMENT 


In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 


Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 




M if Pasadena, whosi 

Lieut. Frederick Terrell, U. S. A., has been 
announced, was chief guest at a buffet supper and 
dance with which Mis^ Helen Newlin, 737 West 
Twenty-eighth street, entertained Friday evening. 
ere Misses Margaret Reynolds, Louise 
Burke, Aimee Brunswig, Helen Chaffee, Margery 
Little, Edith Maurice, Kitty Walbridge, Mildred 
Hadley, Clara Vickers, Sue Carpenter, Emily New- 
1 in. Elizabeth Helm, Dorothy Em'merl of Detroit. 
Adaline Culp; Lieut. Henry F. Green, l". S. M. C. ; 
Messrs. Karl C. Klokke. Kay Crawford, Maynard 
McFie, Jack Somers, II. G. S. Young, Owen Ever- 
m Van Xuvs. James Tape. Archie 
Barnard, Carlton Burke, Lyman McFie, Kendrick 
Chamberlain and Boynton, 

Mrs. Juliette Graham Bixby of No. 24 St. James 
Park, and Lieut. A. H. Robertson of the U. S. S. 
Tennessee, were married Thursday afternoon at the 
bride's home, the ceremony being performed by 
Chaplain Dickins .of the Tennessee. Miss Echo 
Allen attended as maid of honor, and Lieut. W. W.. 
Galbraith stood with the groom as best man. The 
other attendants were Lieut. H. X. Jenson and R. F. 
Gross. 

At their home in Redondo Thursday evening Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry B. Ainsworth entertained with a 
supper and a musicale in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Cosmo Morgan of Mountain View, Cal., wdio are 
\isiting in Los Angeles and Redondo, and Mrs. 
Anna Cash Clarke, who has returned to make Los 
Angeles her home after an extended absence in the 
East. 

Mrs. J. G. Smiley has issued invitations for the 
wedding of her daughter, Miss Dorothea Carmelita 
Mary, to Kent Craig Washburn, Tuesday evening, 
July 21, in St. Luke's Episcopal Church. Mr. Wash- 
burn and his bride will be at home to their friends 
after August 22 at No. 1242 East Fifty-seventh 
street. 

Mrs. Charles C. Carpenter of No. 1153 West 
Twenty-seventh street is entertaining this (Satur- 
day) afternoon in, honor of Mrs.. A. L. Danskin and 
Mrs. Frank P. Flint. Mrs. J. M. Culp of Washing- 
ton, who, with her daughter, Miss Adeline Culp, is 
visiting Mrs. Lynn Helm, is a special guest. 

Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss 
Ruth Elliott Tichnor, of Rockford. Ills., to the Rev. 
Thornton Anthony Mills, son of Rev. and Mrs. B. 
Fay Mills of this city, the ceremony having taken 
place June 30 at the bride's eastern home. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mills will reside in Rockford. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison Barlow and their daughters, 
the Misses Edna, Maybelle and Hazel Barlow, and 
Mrs. H. M. Mosher and Samuel Barlow are spend- 
ing the month of July in the Yosemite Valley. 

The marriage of Miss Alice Woodward Wilkin- 
son and Fairfax Addison Reilly took place Wednes- 
day evening at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 



and Mrs. John B. \\ ilk,;,.,,,,, on Los I eli 
Hollywood. Mrs. \\ in Lantier served as matron 

Of honor. I he bridesmaids were Miss Harriet 
Wilkinson and Miss Jessie Cook, sister and coumu 

oi the bride respectively, lark Hampton stood with 
the groom. The couple will reside in Mount Ver- 
non, X. Y. 

At the home of Mrs. M. 11. Willetts, No. 'MS 
West First street. Tuesday evening, her daughter, 
Miss Edna May dn Yall was united in marriage 
with Charles E, Recs. a young business man of this 
city. The ceremony was followed In' a wedding 
supper at Hotel Lankershim. 

Miss Elizabeth Pepper of South Burlington ave- 
nue entertained Monday evening with a dinner 
party at Hotel Virginia". Long lieach, in honor of 
her sister. Miss Helen Pepper, wlio was married 
W ednesday to Lawrence Stieth of Cleveland, O. 

The marriage of Miss Blanche Witherell, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Oorge VV. Witherell, of South 
Los Robles avenue, Pasadena, to Mr. Ira Warren 
Smith of Attleboro, Mass., took place at the bride's 
home Wednesday evening. 

The marriage of Miss Helen Neville Pepper, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Pepper, 847 South 



V^rtK- 4 *^ 



So. Broad way 




So. Hill Street 



A. FUSENOT CO. 



COLORED DRESS GOODS 



MOHAIRS 

50c to $2 Yard 

Mohairs in plain and fancy brilliantines and 
Sicilians — our assortment of these goods is 
unexcelled." Shown in wide variety at from 
50c to $2.00 a yard. 



YACHTING SERGES 

$1.25 to $2 a Yard 

Yachting Serges, in cream ground with 
black stripes — stripes in various widths. 
These fabrics are modish and up-to-date. 
$1.25 to $2.00 a yard. 



BLACK MOHAIRS 

These Mohairs are very desirable for bath- 
ing suits, for street costumes and for sep- 
arate skirts. Plain and striped effects, in a 
wide range of qualities. Prices begin at 45c 
a yard, running as high as $2.00. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



South Alvarado 
J. A. Barnes of 



Flower street, to Mr. Lawrence C. Steith, of Cleve- 
land, O., Wednesday, was one of the most brilliant 
social events of the month. Mr. and Mrs. Steith 
will reside ini Cleveland. 

Miss Edna Chapin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
E. Chapin of Hollywood, has been much entertained 
during the past two weeks, following the announce- 
ment of her engagement to Frederick Alexander 
Machotka. 

Announcement has been made of the engagement 
of Miss Bessie Turner, daughter of Mrs. Susan Tur- 
ner, 2S0S East Second street, and Fred H. Schauer, 
a young attorney of Santa Barbara. 

Miss Laurita Kimball of this city is house guest 
of Miss Evelyn Jones of Piedmont. She is being 
greatly entertained during her visit to that place. 

Mrs. Sidney Lee Grover of South Burlington ave- 
nue has returned from a motor trip through the 
northern part of the state. 

Mrs. S. A. Rendall of No. 905 
street is entertaining her brother, 
San Antonio, Tex. 

Mrs. K. I. Vollmer of No. 938 Valencia street is 
visiting in Wisconsin and Lafayette, Ind. 

* * * 

A "Voluntary" Confession 

It becomes evident from the following story, 
which hails from a town in the North of England, 
that there are widely varying ideas in existence as 
to what constitutes voluntary testimony on any 
subject. 

"Did I understand you to say that this boy volun- 
tarily confessed his share in the mischief done to the 
schoolhouse?" asked the Magistrate, addressing the 
determined looking female parent of a small and 
dirty boy charged with being concerned in a recent 
raid upon an unpopular schoolmaster. 

"Yes, sir, he did," the woman responded. "I just 
had to persuade him a little, and then he told me the 
whole thing voluntarily." 

"How did you persuade him?" queried his Wor- 
ship. 

"Well, first I gave him a good licking," said the 
firm parent, "and then I put him to bed without 
supper, and I took his clothes away and told him 
he'd stay in bed till he confessed what he'd done, 
if 'twas the. rest of his days, and I should lick him 
again in the morning. And in less than half an hour 
he told me the whole story voluntarily!" 
v v * 
What He Would Be 

"What do you expect to be when you come of 
age, my little man?" asked the visitor. "Twenty- 
one," was the little man's reply. — Herald and Pres- 
byter. 

•$• •£■ t£i 

.A. Pleasing; Prospect 

Freddie — And now that we are engaged, dear, I 
must tell you that I have never kissed a girl before 
in my life. 

Kitty — Good gracious! -Freddie, what an awful 
lot of practice you'll want! — Illustrated Bits. 

* * * 
Such a Rap! 

"Now, don't deny it. Rose. You wore my shoes?" 
"Only once — my feet hurt me so, and I wanted 
something comfortable." — Meggensdorfer Blatter. 



Plan to Visit, 

Yosemite 
Valley 

This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, oi 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Fine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 

Phone F 5141 Tenth and Main Sts. 



A Radical Change In 
Furniture Values 

We have just established a general price reduction 
covering our entire furniture stock. Selling cost 
has been cut on every article. New values are at 
least 10% better than in any other store in town. 
We merely ask comparison. The new selling figures 
will be maintained permanently. Before you pur- 
chase elsewhere, learn values here. 

Strictly One Price— The Same to All 

Los Angeles Furniture Co. 

631-633-635 S. SPRING ST. between 6th and 7th 



draftsman jfuvniture 



Gustav Stickley is the originator and 
only manufacturer of Craftsman Furni- 
ture. We are sole agents for Southern 
California and show a large stock of 
these goods. 



iJeasfc&ros. 
:3Fumttunt do; 

■- 640-646 SOUTH MILL SI. u 

Los Angeles, California 




Pacific Outlook 



15 




Strong California Play 
les theater-goers have enjoyed an op- 
portunity during the past week to witness, on the 
the Belasco, one of the strongest plays 
Founded upon incidents in the early American his- 
tory of the West ever produced. "The Rose of the 
Rami;.." was written by Richard Walton Tully un- 
der another name, and was iduced in Cali- 
fornia at the Burbank. It contained five acts, the 
story was rather disconnected, and though full of 
intense situations was tiresome by reason of the 
great length of time required to present it. In the 
hands of David Belasco the manuscript was blue- 
pencilled, as an editor would say, until the five acts 
were reduced to three and some other changes that 
improved it were made. It was then put on the 
stage of the Belasco Theater in New York, where it 
liecame instantaneously successful, running for two 
years almost without intermission. That its pro- 
duction as "The Rose of the Rancho" in the state 
where the scenes of the play are laid has been fond- 
ly anticipated by Californians was proven Monday 
night by the character of the audience which turned 
out at the Belasco. 

The story lias been told more than once in the 
local press, and it is not necessary to repeat it now. 
The author's work proves that he has made a care- 
ful study of California's history in the first days of 
American occupation and of the customs of the 
native inhabitants. The scenery is faithful to the 
original. When the curtain rose on the first act, 
exhibiting the court of the old mission of Monterey, 
the delight of the audience was manifested in a 
spontaneous outbreak of applause which was more 
eloquent than words as a mark of appreciation. Un- 
like many of the best plays, which frequently are 
marred by overwrought or underdone scenery, ''The 
Rose of the Rancho" is staged with absolute fidelity 
to history. And the costuming, too, is in accord- 
with what early Californians know to have been 
typical of the natives six decades ago. 

Miss Jane Grey, who takes the title role — Juan- 
ita, called by her friends "La Rosa del Rancho" — 
received an ovation at the end of the second act, in 
which she revealed powers which were a surprise to 
many of those who have become familiar with her 
work since she came to the R.elasco. That she has 
made a profound study of the character, familiariz- 
ing herself with this particular type of early Cali- 



fornian, as history and tradition have portrayed it. 

was manifest. She shows elements of true great- 
ness, and no stock company, however good, will 
hold her For lon^. 

Lewis Stone, as Kearney, the representative of 
the United States government who is sent to Cali- 
fornia to protect the dubious titles of the natives 
to the lands they occupy, well represents the strong 
type of Easterner of that day. Howard Scott has 
come to an understanding of the "nianana" pro- 
clivities of the prosperous descendants of the Cas- 
tilians who made California their home for genera- 
tions before the "Gringo" displaced them. His Don 
Luis is to be highly complimented. Harry Glazier 
is eminently qualified for such a role as that of 
Kinkaid, one of the notorious land-jumpers who 
helped to make the name "Americano" so utterly, 
and so justly, detested by those who were so un- 
ceremoniously routed from the homes of their an- 
cestors in the name of the law. Alrhough cast for 
a minor part, William Yerance caused thrill aftei 
thrill to pass over the audience by his powerful pre- 
sentation of the, role of Tomasco, a faithful servant 
of the ancient Castro family. The support gener- 
ally was excellent. 

If the initial performances are to be taken as a 
criterion of the future work of the company, with 
the improvement that is sure to follow as the play 
scheme becomes more familiar "The Rose of the 
Rancho" undoubtedly will prove one of the most 
successful productions ever put on in a Los An- 
geles house. It is a play not only for persistent 
theater-goers, but one for every Californian. It is 
not only entertaining, but it is educating. If the 
better class of Los Angelans wish to give proof of 
their appreciation of the' efforts of some of our the- 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zhe Starr piano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



atrical managers to supply the demand for the best 
class of plays, and especially if they would show 
their loyalty to California and their love for Cali- 
fornia's history, they can do so in no better way 
than by witnessing this splendid appealing play, 
"The Rose of the Rancho", and asking that it be re- 
produced until the public demand is thoroughly 
satisfied. 

D. O. N. 



Has Not Abandoned Grand Opera 

Since Henry W. Savage's 'announcement that he 
would not send the English Grand Opera Company 
on tour next season, some writers have accepted 
the statement as a permanent discontinuance of the 



Golden West", but, on reaching Italy and learning 
that the composer had not yet completed the score 
of his first act, and that the piece would not be 
ready for production until the autumn of 1909, Mr. 
Savage scoured Europe for another grand opera 
novelty. Finding nothing which, in. 'his judgment, 
equalled "Madam Butterfly", he preferred to cancel 
the coming season's tour, which already had been 
booked from New York to Los Angeles, rather than 
to disappoint the 'hundreds of thousands of Ameri- 
can music lovers in different parts of the United 
States who have learned to look upon the visit of 
the Savage English Grand Opera Company as the 
musical event of the year. N 

■ In addition to "The Girl of the Golden West" 






Jane Grey 
Leading lady of the Eelasco Stock Company, who has scored a triumph as Juanita in "The Rose of the Rancho.' 



company, winch has built up such a splendid pat- 
ronage throughout the United States. 

There is but one reason for Mr. Savage's tempor- 
ary suspension of grand opera. After visiting every 
European center of operatic production during his 
recent trip abroad, he was unable to find a fitting 
successor of "Madam Butterfly". This classic com- 
position of Giacomo Puccini marked the pinnacle 
of success attained by trie Savage organization 
during its fourteen years' existence, and set a stan- 
dard for grand opera in English which the Ameri- 
can impresario is loath to desert. 

He had intended to follow "Madam Butterfly" 
with a production of Puccini's "The Girl of the 



Mr. Savage 'has two most promising grand operas, 
which are now in course of preparation. They will 
be produced in conjunction with "The Girl of the 
Golden West," and compose for the first time in the 
history of grand opera, a repertoire of three new 
works. 

* * * 

Already Convinced 

"Do you believe in ghosts?" asked the man who 
resents all superstition. 

"No, suh," answered Mr. Erastus Pinkley. "An' 
all I's hopin' is dat dem ghos'es will lemme stay dat 
way 'stid o' comin' aroun' tryin' to convince me." — 
Washington Star. 



Pacific Outlook 



1 / 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



Bv Pmtl / I'lKi.n 

ption all "i" tlu- artists who 
have attempted to paint California scenes have been 
d in other parts of the country, natives <>i other 
\rtists have come and sought impressions, 
searching vail is, and skirting the 

mers in a land of promise, way- 
farers in an unrecognized corner of paradise; for 
it takes a native to know his own heaven and to 
simmer in his own hell. It is the ranch boy who 
has endured Nature in all her vagaries who knows 
her best. The sheep herder is more familiar with 
night than even the camper, timorous of strange 
cries. 

Nearly all painters find California interesting lie- 
cause strange. It is difficult to take line weather 
as a natural event. Weather-beaten sinners, we are 
amazed at a sunny world. Much remains to be 
painted which has not as yet heen touched upon by 




Dawn of the Flowers 

By John W. Gamble 

the nomads of the brush. Some rare aspects of our 
hills have been happily hit upon, however, and none 
more successfully than the flower-strewn slopes 
which abound in dazzling color among the Sierras. 
John W. Gamble of Santa Barbara does work of 
various kinds. He is not confined to one scheme of 
color, but his studies of the meadows of blooms 
which cover the foothills in early spring are pecu- 
liarly his own. He takes a field of lupin or a bottom 
smothered in, gilia flowers and surcharges his can- 
vas with a brilliance of color, daring, startling and 
beautiful. He is a flower painter, indeed, not of 
plucked blossoms, sterile in earthen jars, but a stu- 
dent of live plants, maturing and dancing in the 
wind. His pictures are so breezy that one almost 
scents the sagey perfume which the climber bruises 
from the brush as lie mounts. While he riots in 
color among the wild flowers he is not incapable of 
subtler harmonies, treating in wooing mood the 



Waist Department Presents 

Innumerable 

Dainty Styles at Tempting Prices for the Summer 

Season 

11 yon imagine 
pleasanter or 
charming siyht on 
warm summer day 
than a pretty woman 
wearing a dainty, cool, 
white shirtwaist? It 
imparts to the wearer 
a> delightful freshni 
of appearance unaffect- 
ed by the sun's melting 
rays. 

It is our good for- 
tune to be in a position 
to provide every wo- 
man with summer 
shirtwaists, simple or 
most elaborate, plain 
tailored or artistically 
designed from the sheerest of materials combined 
with exquisitely wrought lace and embroidery, in 
endless variety. The important point is just here — 
the PRICES are so reasonable that you can afford 
to indulge in an extravagant assortment of tnese 
summer necessities. 

''iO/^tTHI/NG,^^. DOING' 





BROADWAY 



COR. FIFTH ST. 



Otto Stcincn Supply Co. v 


\ \M 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and ( 
Tabic Knives, Corkscrews, i 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors. Shears, Cutlery _ 
Specialties and Novelties. ~ 


^m 


do it well. 


-l I Vr\ 


210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 


I\J 



DuBois ®> Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cil. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets \ r T^ •""> /~\ O T 
Draperies J\ [ LU J 1 

Lace Curtains 



1 



J. E. MEYER 

Stocks, Bonds and Investments 
Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH grade: securities 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



.softer twilight hours. His work has strength, au- 
dacity and purpose, and is quite free from any sou- 
venir sentimentality, that bane of inspiration and 
spectre of success which turns a palette in.to a work- 
shop and beggars the artist with a pittance of es- 
teem. Mr. Gamble paints in a buoyant spirit as be- 
fits a California.11. For what reasons should we 
carry a tender tear in our eye, spendthrifts of a 
blooming eternity that we are, inferential saints of 
the setting sun? Mr. Gamble has disregarded all 
academic formulae which are niggardly in, joy, and 
sound in wind and limb we scramble with him from 
height to height, from ridge to ridge, calling to the 
world below that life is good because the world is 
beautiful. These pictures are tonic. We reproduce 
a picture by Mr. Gamble this week. It would be a 
pleasure to see an exhibition of the paintings of this 
artist in Los Angeles next winter. 



Mrs. William Wendt began her labors in her new 
studio by work on a medallion, of Mrs. Charles 
Pope. The completed disk is to be a dainty affair 
not over four inches in diameter and is to be cast in 
bronze. 

Two new pictures by Hobart Bosworth are to be 
seen in Steckel's gallery. They are Arizona scenes, 
as so much of Mr. Bosworth's work is. Several 
paintings by local artists may be seen in this room, 
as well as a group of pastels by Margaret Patterson 
done in her characteristic style of warm rich hues. 



J. W. Clawson. has returned from Salt Lake, 
where he went to paint a portrait of Gov. Wells. He 
is now working on a portrait of. Homer Laughlin 
and also finishing a canvas for the Jonathan Club 
with a portrait of F. K. Rule. 
t ♦ t 
Bryan's Eloquence 

William Jennings Bryan was addressing a poli- 
tical meeting in Iowa on one occasion when, it is 
said, he fairly carried away his audience by the 
power of his oratory. Among those most impressed 
by the Nebraskan's effort, (says a story-teller in 
Lipipincott's Magazine), was a man known to be 
very deaf, but who nevertheless seemed to be, listen- 
ing with breathless attention to Bryan, and who ap- 
parently caught every word that fell from the 
speaker's lips. 

Finally, when a particularly fervid passage had 
been delivered by the man from Nebraska, with the 
effect of eliciting a storm of applause from the audi- 
ence, the deaf man, as if he could contain himself 
no longer, yelled in the ear of the man next to him : 

"Who is that speakin'?" 

"William Jennings Bryan !" shouted the man ad- 
dressed. 

"Who?" roared the deaf man, still louder. 

"William Jennings Bryan, of Nebraska !" came 
from the second man in a piercing shriek. 

"Well, well !" exclaimed the deaf man, excitedly. 
"It don't make any difference, after all. I can't 
make out a word he or you are sayin' ; but, good 
gracious, don't he do the motions splendid !" 
* * * 

"If I were younger," said the rich old man, "I 
believe I might win you for my wife." 

"Yes," replied the cold beauty, dreamily consider- 
ing his sixty-five years; "or, say, fifteen years older." 
— Philadelphia Press. 



IMPERIAL 


VALLEY 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 50 x 130 (t. lots, $100. 




Loft vis &. Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




Established 1889 



Phones Home Ex 531 
Main 7715 



TROY 

THE 

\ BEST 



Largest Steam Laundry in 
Southern California 



Troy Laundry 
Company 

Corner 1 1th and Main Streets 

Uptown Offices I23}4 W. 3rd. 
223 W. 5th. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE i= DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Artistic Designs 
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7I6 - 7I s 8 p!?n U c T Wt 




Pacific Outlook 



19 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Pnil HiKi.n 

In "The Gourmet's Guide to Europe" Lieut. Col. 
Newnham-Davis has written a valuable book for 
fortunai who have educated palates, 

author has dined in France, Italy. Spain, Ger- 
many, Austria. Rus len, Norway, Denmark, 
Portugal, the Balkan states and Turkey. He tells 
the reader what t" eat and what to avoid in those 
countries. Paris, he says, naturally is the culinary 
centre of the world. "Wherever the great cooks are 
hum." he adds, "and most of them as a matter of 
fact see the light in the Midi — they all come to Paris 
to learn their art. and then go out through the 
whole civilized world as culinary missionaries, 
preaching that there is hut one cuisine, and that the 
Haute Cuisine Francaise." The Parisians have at 
their doors some materials which can he found no 
where else in the world. For example, says Colonel 
Newnham-Davis, "veal is practically an unknown 
meat in London ; and the calf which has been fed 
on milk and yolk of egg, and which has flesh as soft 
as a kiss and as white as snow, is only to be found 
in the Parisian restaurants. I know of one gourmet 
who was so enamoured of French veal that he made 
a pilgrimage in the month of August to Pontoise 
to taste it at its best." 

( >ne anecdote relates to an occasion on which the 
author took a lady to breakfact at the Tour d'Ar- 
gent. He began the order that he gave to Frederic 
himself with a suggestion of eggs, leaving it to the 
great man to decide how they should be prepared. 
Suddenly his companion spoke, saying, "Uffs a la 
plat," with an air as of helping out. "Frederic 
came back from the clouds and gave the ladv one 
look. It was not a look of anger or contempt, but 
simply an expression of pity for the whole of her 
sex." It is of this poet that Colonel Newnham- 
Davis tells the following anecdote: 

Frederic is a believer, as all great maitres d'hotel 
are, in a very short dinner. When the secretary 
of the Bering Sea Conference interviewed Frederic, 
at Lord Hannen's request, told him that the mem- 
bers of the two missions would dine at the Tour 
d' Argent, and sketched out a twelve-course dinner 
with a sorbet in the middle of it, Frederic asked 
him politely to take his diplomatists elsewhere for 
such a barbarous meat would never be served on the 
Quai de la Tourelle. 



Mr. George Moore will shortly bring out a book 
to be called "Hail and Farewell". It gives an ac- 
count of his sojourn in Ireland during the last few 
years. He weighs the land and the people in a bal- 
ance and finds them wanting. He is reported to 
have said: "Dublin is now divided into two sets: 
one half is afraid it will be in the book, and the other 
half is afraid it won't. I have dealt with them all 
with the same sense of fun with which I look at my- 
self. All the characters are men, and I have studied 
their psychology as freely as I would that of fic- 
tional characters. There is nothing libelous in trie 
book, however, and I have not represented my 
friends as stealing the spoons." 



A grandson of Darwin's has lately entered the 
field as a writer of fiction. This recalls to the amus- 
ing critic of "The Pall Mall Gazette" that the great 
scientist was himself an omnivorous reader of 
novels. "In his earlier years he had devoured the 




FTrfrfr 
Woman's Hatter 
French and UnglisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 




jfurtratta by 
Pjningrapim 



Pbone 
E1315 



HANA ROB1SON 
Residence Studio— 2323 West Ninth Street 

Sittings by Appointment 



Msi 




/f Ladies' 


0% 




%tp^ Tailor 


Every garment 


made in my establishment is de- 


signed to su 


t the 


characteristics of each customer. 


My price and workmanship cannot be duplicated in the 


city. A call 


will convince you. 




903 South Broadway 




Visit ors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER... 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your oHer on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
loo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 3500 
250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,00a " - 280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



great poets, but as he grew older he could not en- 
dure a line of poetry, and found even Shakespeare 
'so intolerably dull that it nauseated me.' Corre- 
spondingly his love for fiction increased. Scott, 
Miss Austen and Mrs. Gaskell were read till they 
could be read no more, and even the cheap stuff of 
the circulating library was not despised. He said 
once that he found works of imagination a relief and 
pleasure, 'and I often bless all novelists.' Many- 
were read aloud to him, an.d he liked them all if 
moderately good, 'and if they do not end unhappily 
— against which a law ought to be passed.' A novel 
was not first class, he thought, unless it contained 
a pretty woman whom one could love." 



When Lord Randolph Churchill chose to discard 
manners he was ' entirely successful in the effort. 
Sir Algernon West, in the book of reminiscences 
which he has lately published, says that Lord Ran- 
dolph "did not bear fools gladly and was hardly 
capable of being, even civil to people who bored 
him" : 

On one occasion he went in to a formal luncheon, 
where the places were arranged. He looked to the: 
right of him and he looked to the left of him — he 
gathered up his plate and napkin and knife and fork 
and sat himself down at the other end of the table. 
This reminds me of a story of a very distinguished 
statesman, Lord John Russell, who took the 
Duchess of Inverness in to dinner. When he got to 
his place he looked behind him and walked round 
to the other side of the table, and sat down next to 
the Duchess of St. Albans. Lady John said to him 
afterwards : "What on earth made you leave the 
Duchess of Inverness and go across to the Duchess 
of St. Albans?" "Well," he replied, "I should have 
been sick if I had sat where I was put, with my 
back to the fire." "But I hope," said his wife, "you 
explained it to the Duchess of Inverness." "No, I 
didn't," he said, "but I did to the Duchess of St. 
Albans !" 



In his new book on the "Court of Russia," Mr. 
E. A. B. Hodgetts gives a strange picture of Alex- 
ander III, father of the present Czar: 

He had only little self-control, and would fly into 
paroxysms of rage, when it was not even safe for 



his wife to approach him. On one occasion he was 
known to have nearly killed a German nerve spec- 
ialist whom he had called in to examine his son and 
with whose medical opinion he was profoundly dis- 
satisfied. He gave him a box on the ear which 
literally sent him flying out of the room. 



New Books at the Public Library 

History of Modern Italian Art, by Ashton Rol- 
lins Willard (Longmans, 1900), is a rather sparsely 
illustrated volume treating of recent-. architecture, 
sculpture and painting in Italy. Although the re- 
productions do not seem to represent a very force- 
ful art in most instances, they are of interest as in- 
dicating the contemporary Italian temperament. 
"Ploughing in the Engadine", by Segantini, is one 
of the best things in the book, stronger and less 
sentimental than the madonnas. 

Turkey and the Turks, by W. S. Monroe (Page, 
1907), gives an account in brief of the history of 
Turkey and more fully a description of the land and 
the customs of the people. Turkey is a country full 
of contradictions, and more than a superficial record 
of its characteristics is not attempted in this volumt. 
The writer, who apparently has passeu many 
months in: Turkey, says of Constantinople that it is 
dryest and healthiest and the temperature most 
equable from May to September. It is, in fact, a 
not unpleasant place to visit during the summer. 

*The Inward Light, by H. Fielding Hall (Mac- 
millan, 1908). This is a dream book for poets and 
"sky children". It is a romance of things which 
may not be g-rasped — elusive realities which we 
name and ignore. It is full of the reveries which 
are the better part of action — the twilights of in- 
spiration. The book is an exposition of Buddhism. 
"The essential thing to know about any belief is 
not the form that belief is expressed in, not the 
words that actually are said ; you want to know 
what the teller wanted to say, what the hearer 
heard." This is what Mr. Hall tries to make clear 
by means of story, parable and precept. The mys- 
terious charm of the Far East lurks in the pages. 
It is not a book for busy and fussy people but 
rather for those who have learned somewhat of the 
power of inaction, the cumulative force of peace. 

*Recommended for reading. 



{Broad Gauge 
Handsome 
Strong 
Comfy 




HAM MOCKS 

E would extend a most cordial invi- 
tation the many readers of the Out- 
look to come in and inspect our immense 
stock of Hammocks. As in years past, we 
are only showing hammocks of good qual- 
ity. Even the cheapest are selected with 
great care, that we may give full value even 
to those who may come with not o'er full 
purses. In buying under our big roof one 
has the advantages of an almost unlimited 
stock to select from, including not only the 
favorites, but a greater variety of new ideas 
, and styles than we have ever had the good 

fortune to secure before. 

"The pleasure will be ours, if we may but show you." 

TteB WM. M. IHI®E«E C©„ Ifoc. 



Both Phone Exchanges 87 



138-140-142 South Main St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Life 

by RumcU Lcwiiit the are of thitr 
ml dints. 

la a t 

miff 

II .1 puff. 

'Tis uncertain 

. curtain 
Down may drop. 
If we be 

and free 
Life more than :i dream will be. 

Make our life 
Without strife — 
itiful. 

And the sadness 
Ami the badm 
Overcome with one ^reat gladness. 

+ + * 
Misused ArVords 

Few words are ci mimoner in the language of the 
newspapers than the word "alleged". To allege 
anything, it the old meaning be good, is to affirm it 
with the exactness of a dispatch. But the participle 
• if this verb lias found new service. Whenever any 
il' Miht is felt that a murder is a murder, the deed is 
softened to an "alleged" murder. Whenever a man 
his watch and his senses and cannot tell ex- 
actly how they went, the lamentable occurrence is 
chronicled as an "alleged" robbery. According to 
these modern linguistic lights an allegation means 
a guess. 

"Phenomenon", applied to something wonderful 
and abnormal, is a common instance of high-flown 
vulgarity, much in the mouths and on the pens of 
persons who can hardly have compassed the truth 
that a shower of rain is just as positively a phenom- 
enon as a shower of frogs, a calf with six legs or a 
fi mr-ounce loganberry. 

"Immense" is an adjective seldom used but in 
such a manner as to confute its own meaning. Thus, 
in an account of some discovery beneath, an ancient 
ruin it w r as said that skeletons of great size were 
found, one of them being of the "immense length 
mI" seven feet and ten inches". If the length of this 
skeleton was really seven feet and ten inches, or 
ten feet and seven inches, how could it have been 
immense?" So, too, we read of walls of "immense" 
thickness, and pumpkins of "immense" growth. 
Are there, then, no foot-rulers or measuring tapes 
to reduce these immensities? 

A "conflagration" is not the burning of one house, 
however big. Ti is the meeting of flames, as when 
a town or city is fired in several places. Analyze 
the word for yourself. 

"Culminate" is used incorrectly much more fre- 
quently than otherwise, unless in respect to some- 
thing which has reached the limit of its possible 
height. When, therefore the career of a wrong- 
doer is said to have "culminated" in the lowest 
depths of degradation, the term is misapplied, even 
to being turned upside down. 

So is the term "assiduous" when employed to 
strengthen the idea of perseverance, if the particular 



kind of perseverance intimated be locomotive, and 
sedentary, 

iUS", unless clearly denoting 

the figure which homely rhetoric describes as "put- 
ting the cart b 

+ * + 

Mig'Kt Suspend Sentence 

At a Thursday evening prayer-meeting held in a 

small town in the interior nut Ion- ago a member 

i'f the church arose an.] said he had a confession 1" 

make. Much against his will he had been beguiled 

in'" buying mining st. >cks as a speculation. 

The pasl d hoi rifled "P sinner," "I osl 

soul," "God forgive him." were some of the expres- 
sions heard from the brethren. 

"Yes, 1 put up for the mining stocks. 1 was 
tempted by Satan and yielded." continued the re- 
pentant; lint there was little anguish in his voice. 
A brother grew suspicious. 

"How much?" he asked cautiously. 

"Well. 1 invested about $2,000." 

"And you lust it all, and there's no hope for you?" 
he continued. 

"Bless me. no. Brother Smith. 1 cleared about 
$1,800." 

"Ah! That somewhat alters the case. I believe, 
Elder," continued Brother Smith, addressing a dig- 
nified looking old man seated across the aisle, "that 
if our brother bought a four-hundred-dollar bell for 
the church and paid for the revarnishing of the pews 
the Lord would let him off this time on suspended 
sentence." 

The church will have a bell as soon as the order 
can be filled. 

* + + 

The Long Arm 

"Yes," said Mr. Nias reflectively as he drew his 
chair out on the porch in the center of the family 
circle, "I certainly had some wild experiences when 
I was a locomotive engineer. I remember one night 
I was ordered to take a doctor from Chicago to 
Mendota in the quickest possible time. To make 
my engine light I uncoupled the tender and left it 
on the side track. "When the doctor took a seat on 
the fireman's box I threw the lever down in the 
corner and gave her steam. Away we jumped like 



SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 

of the American Petroleum Company 

At par, with an equal stock bonus. A choice in- 
vestment security with strong profit features. 

Fielding J. Stilson Co. 

Financial Agents 
305 H. W. Hellman Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Japanese and Oriental 



ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANT) EMBTlOITiEFUES 



Vou make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

*D('rec7 
TOSt Importers 
533 South Broadway 



Ka\iuchx B 



Pacific Outlook 



a scared kangaroo. The doctor's eyes stuck out 
like a pair of porcelain door-knobs as we hustled 
over the prairie toward Riverside. 

" 'What's that? A post?' asked the doctor, as we 
passed something in a jiffy. 

" 'That was a coal shed 120 feet long.' I replied. 
'So you can see how fast we are going.' 

" 'What's that funny looking fringe on our left?' 
asked the doctor. 

" 'Them's the telegraph poles.' answered the fire- 
man, as he stopped half a minute from shoveling 
coal just as we zipped through the shop yards at 
Aurora. 

"Well, we made Mendota without a stop in forty- 
one minutes and a half, just two miles to the min- 
ute, and I boiled the coffee in my dinner pail on the 
driving boxes." 

"What a long-armed fireman you must have had, 
pa," put in young Anna Nias, his daughter, as she 
looked up from the copy of Muenel-u.usen she had 
been reading. 

"Why — how's that?" asked Nias. 

"Why, to shovel coal in Aurora from a tender that 
stood on a side track in Chicago!" 

Nias — well, it was bed time, anyway, and he was 
weary. 

• ■♦ '# 

Hig£H Finance 

Van der Morgen was rubbing his hands and smil- 
ing all over as he met Simpson the other day, and 
the latter felt impelled to inquire : 

"Has your silver mine turned out a bonanza?" 
"Huh! Haven't heard from it in over a month." 
"You look as pleased as if you had a thousand 
tons of ore in sight." 

"Oh, no. I have just been giving away $100,000 
worth of the stock." 
"Not giving it away!" 

"Yep. Didn't cost the recipients one cent." 
"What kind of a way to run a mine is that?" 
"Oh, 3'ou needn't worry, old man — not a bit. 
We've got to have some shares out in order to 
make an assessment, and next week we shall call 
for forty cents on the dollar, in order to meet the 
expenses of survey and machinery. Don't you 
worry about me, Simpson." 

♦ * * 
Irreparable Loss 

"The boat has capsized and your son has 
drowned," exclaimed one of a fishing party as he 
rushed up to an elderly man who was just throwing 
out his line. 

"Great 'heavens!" exclaimed the afflicted parent 
■as he burst into tears. "My poor boy! He was my 
only hope in life. He was the best boy in the fam- 
ily. And besides . that he had the bait cup with 
him." 

* * * 

Be Polite 

A famous Frenchman has given this definition of 
a polite man : "One who listens with apparent in- 
terest to things he knows all about when they are 
told by a person who knows nothing about them." 
+ * * 

Of Course 

"In what condition was the patriarch Job at the 
end of his life?" asked the Sunday school teacher. 
"Dead," calmly replied the solemn-looking boy. 







r 




Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



♦I Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 



3&HIF1G OTUILIXDJI 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 



Gmmrgm Baker Jtndmrson 

COlTOR 



H. C. Jrckerty 

PRESIDENT 



P ubiished every Saturday 
Lissner Build ng . lei Jtngetes, California, by f/i#* 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year In advance. Jingle copy .5 
cents on alt newM stands. 

nifc»t„i t^nmiiiM Aprilt.i.}.^, at the poitoffice ai Lo* Angelet, 
California, ander the act of Congreat t>; * 

The Editor of tbe Pacific OtTLooK cannot guarantee to return manuicript* 
ifcougB be will en dear or to do to if itarnpa for tbat purpoie are incloied with them 
If Tour roanuacript ia valuable. Weep a copy of it. 

Vol. 5. Los Jingeles, Cal., July 18, 1908 Mo, 3 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 
The FnrlflV Outlook In mni It'll to mibscrlbera Uiruu^li the 
I. on Anseleit Phhi Office every Friday, iintl should be de- 
Urered in every purl of (he city by Miturdny's pont. if for 
amy renxnn it should be delayed, or be delivered In poor 
coadltloa, aabacrtbera will confer n favor upon the publishers 
by Btvlaaj tliem immediate notice. 



M A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

J To offer a truth to a man who is so blinded by 

(j his own prejudice that he not only refuses to accept 

3 it, but also refuses to investigate it honestly after it 

2 has been proven by many, is simply casting your 

fl pearls of thought before the swinish element of the 

j human mind. Invariably it will turn and rend you 

A Hiram W. Hayes. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
THE CITY COUNCIL is in itself, as at present 
and for many years past constituted, the strongest 
and most convincing argument for the adoption of 
an entirely new City Charter. Having arrived at a 
correct understanding of the aims of the revision 
commission, acting partly in response to an increas- 
ingly popular demand for the curtailment of the 
powers of the institution 1 known as the ward poli- 
tician, to prepare for submission to the people an 
instrument which partially obliterates ward lines 
and consequently is a step toward ridding the muni- 
cipality of the curse of ward politics in general city 
affairs, the majority in the council, after having 
fiddled and fooled around as long as possible to do 
so, under the pretext that it needed further time 'to 

consider the various proposals of 

Preparing the commission, has finally put 

Its Own Grave itself on record as an enemy to 

the reforms proposed. These 
members have declared, in terms which admit of no 
question, that so long as they may be able to pre- 
vent it. the voters of Los Angeles shall have no 
opportunity to decide for themselves what sort of 
a charter they shall have as the basis for their gov- 
ernment. But, after, all, what else was to have been 
expected from the men who control in the council? 
If there is anything illuminating in the history of. 
the present council — we except at least three of its 
members — it should long since have come to be re- 



garded a conclusion that the profes- 

sional ward politicians comprising the majority in 
that body would not give their consent to any pro- 
cess by which the people themselves might 
direct expression to their views on the characti 
the foundation to be placed underneath municipal 

gi iviTiimciil in Los Angeles. 

* + * 

WE HAVE SAID- that the council, per se, is the 
most convincing argument in behalf of the adoption 
of a new charter — an instrument through which the 
cheap local politician and ward heeler would find 
his power abridged, if not practically destroyed; 
his occupation gone. The representatives (save the 
mark!) of this type in the present council have suc- 
ceeded in staving off the inevitable, for a time; and 
that is all. The practical abolition of ward lines — 
one of the most noteworthy features of the docu- 
ment prepared by the commission whose labors 
have come to naught — will be secured in time. Of 
this there is no doubt. But though such a feature 
in 1 our organic law is temporarily impossible of 

achievement as a part of a new char- 
Solution of ter, nothing whatever stands in the 
the Problem way of submitting to popular vote, 

through the invocation of the initia- 
tive clause in the present charter, the question of 
the adoption of an amendment making provision for 
exactly the same reorganization of the wards of the 
city as was proposed by the charter commission. 
The iron should be struck while it is at white heat. 
Not an hour should be lost in setting the initiative 
petitions in circulation, and the electon should be 
called for the earliest possible day. Let the people 
clip the talons of the vulture which we call the ward 
politician, who, by combination with others of his 
ilk, is able to make the legslative department of the 
government of a great city the medium through 
which he is able to secure his prey. Then, with a 
council representing the whole people, we may rest 
assured that the needed new charter will be brought 
within our reach. 

• ♦ ♦ 

LAWS ARE MADE to be enforced. If a law be 
a bad one it should be enforced just the same as if 
it were of a beneficent nature. The enforcement of 
a bad law will eventually be followed by the repeal 
of such law, provided its enforcement makes it un- 
popular. The cry is raised by the defenders of the 
principle of free speech that the police department 
should not enforce the law intended to prohibit 
speaking on the streets without a license unless it 
intends to enforce other laws. It might as well be 
argued that the statute making burglary a crime 
should remain 1 a dead letter unless the local ordi- 
nance regulating the speed of automobiles is to be 
similarly enforced. The ordinance 
About Law affecting the so-called right of free 
Enforcement speech may be a bad one. and one 
that should be repealed. We do not 
doubt that it should be amended in some particular, 



4 



Pacific O u t I o k 



at least, and possibly repealed altogether. But so 
long- as it stands it should be obeyed, except in' the 
event that a test of its constitutionality is to be 
sought. And in order to test its constitutionality 
we do not believe that it is necessary for half a hun- 
dred or half a dozen persons to violate it and go to 
jail in the guise of "martyrs"; nor do we believe 
that it is wise on the part of the socialists of Los 
Angeles to parade the streets singing 'the Marsel- 
laise in order to convince the courts that the City 
Council had no right to adopt the ordinance. The 
abuse of the right of free speech and "free singing" 
will make many persons' wish that the ordinance 
were more stringent rather than that we should 
have no regulations whatever on the subject. 
♦ .1 ♦ 

THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK has had occasion 
heretofore to commend Thomas D. Woolwine, city 
prosecutor, for the stand he has taken in regard to 
the enforcement of the ordinances enacted for the 
governance of the people of Los Angeles. He is to 
be commended particularly for one thing: he plays 
no favorites. If the City Council should adopt an 
ordinance making it a misdemeanor for a preacher 
of the gospel to elevate his voice, in preaching, to 
the point where it would rise superior to the confin- 
ing; walls of a church edifice, and 
Mr. Woolwine Mr. Woolwine"s attention were 
Means Business directed to a violation of such an 
ordinance, we should most cer- 
tainly expect him to invoke the law in the case. He 
has declared, according to reports in the daily press, 
that he will employ his office to compel the observ- 
ance of the ordinance prohibiting street speaking 
without a license. He has also declared that he is 
prepared to prosecute owners and proprietors of 
houses of ill fame, for which this city is becoming 
notorious. Rut despite his courage and his deter- 
mination it is doubtful if he will be able to achieve 
the results at which he aims without the earnest co- 
operation of the police commission. He has put the 
proposition in such form that the mayor and the 
commission must put 'themselves on record offi- 
cially. 

4* *£■ q$i 

IT IS UNFORTUNATE, perhaps, that the pres- 
ent City Charter was so framed as' to make it prac- 
tically impossible for the office of city attorney, or 
prosecuting attorney, to proceed against all viola- 
tors of the law without first having received author- 
ity to do so from the police commission. He might 
take the initiative, we presume ; but if he should do 
so against the wishes of the police commission and 
the mayor, who is responsible for the commission, 
and they should refuse to co-operate with him to 
the end that the law should be enforced, his efforts 
might be temporarily futile. A sensible and prac- 
tical prosecuting officer will not "run amuck". He 
will endeavor to procure the enforcement of the law 

by invoking the aid and co-operation 

Who Are of the authorities invested with 

Responsible? power greater than that which he 

possesses. But a fearless and con- 
scientious official like Mr. Woolwine can' place a 
police commission in a most embarrassing position, 
inviting popular contempt for it, by insisting 
that it confer upon him authority to bring proceed- 
ings for the enforcement of the laws. This he has 
done, as the first step toward procuring the punish- 



ment of the promoters of the greatest social evil — 
the owners, proprietors and perhaps the political 
protectors of the infamous institutions which form 
the strong right arm of the local political "ma- 
chines". By_ ignoring the demand recently made 
upon them will not the mayor and the police com- 
missioners go upon record as sponsors for harlotry. 
as defenders of a system which is a curse upon the 
name of the city, as viewing their several oaths of 
office as things lightly to be considered? 

* * * 

IN THE NAME of humanity, in the name of 
morality, in the name of decency and in the name of 
justice, the people of California and the offspring 
of unfit parents are to be congratulated that the ef- 
forts of C. C. Desmond, trustee of the Whittier Re- 
form School, looking toward a correction of .the 
gross evils which have been practiced in that in- 
stitution, bid fair to bring forth fruit. Governor 
Gillett has conferred upon the State Board of Chari- 
ties authority to hear testimony, and this may be 
taken to mean that if as the outcome of such hear- 
ing sufficient testimony be adduced, showing that 
Trustee Desmond did not bring his charges against 

the management of that institution 
Whittier without tangible evidence in sup- 

to Be Probed port thereof, the iniquities of which 

complaint has been made will be 
properly punished. Mr. Desmond is not the sort of 
man who talks at random for the purpose of hear- 
ing himself; nor is he of the sort that "plays to the 
galleries" for political effect. He has said that the 
administration of the Whittier institution is cor- 
rupt. His associates on the board have practically 
said that Mr. Desmond does not know what he has 
been talking about. They have done what they 
could to hamper him in his efforts to secure a full 
and honest investigation. We look to see them con- 
founded, basing our anticipations on the well-known 
reputation of Mr. Desmond for veracity and pre- 
paredness for any task to which he sets his hand. 
Let us hope that the State Board of Charities will 
run the probe to the bottom, regardless of who suf- 
fers as the result of the disclosures. 
+ * * 

THE SUCCESSFUL outcome of the efforts to 
procure the disbarment of Judge Dunne of the Su- 
perior Court of San Francisco would probably be a 
great blessing in disguise. Such an act would be a 
fitting climax to the outrageous siege of Justice in 
California at which the rest of the country has 
stood aghast. The threat hidden in the blow aimed 
at the blinded goddess, through one of her adminis- 
trators, is easily discernible. It' is a warning to the 
bench of California that hereafter the mandates of 
the oligarchy must be obeyed and that 
A Fitting there must be no criticism of decrees 
Climax favorable to it, under penalty of being 
deprived forever of the right not only 
to sit upon the bench but to engage in the practice 
of the law within the borders of this domain of craft 
and graft. H the movement to disbar Judge Dunne 
should by any chance prove successful — a most re- 
mote possibility, to be sure, but still a possibility — 
what an avalanche of popular wrath would fall upon 
and smother the wielder of the implement which 
dislodged it! The almost immediate outcome could 
hardly fail to be the complete triumph of the forces 
of right and the restoration of her throne to Justice. 



Pacific Outlook 



■ that Jui ■ the 

sacriri rifice be i 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE POLITICAL BUREAU of the Southern 

itiveh offered the name of 

rnor Gillett a> a candidate for the United 

The legal department of tins 

institution understo tursc, at the "time when 

the > - name was put forward as a "feeler", 

that the Constitution of California forbids the elec- 

te. The Constitu- 
tion i- not taken very seriously by the railroad ma- 
chine, as we all know; and if it be finally definitely 
decided that Gillett i- the man for the 
Herrin*s place, he will be elected — provided the 
"Feeler" house-cleaning element within the party 
not succeed meanwhile in taking 
n of the legislature. While the constitu- 
tional inhibition is plain and unequivocal, it is also 
a fact that the United States Senate is the tin n 1 judge 
of the qualifications of its own members; and if the 
railroad machine sin mid happen to succeed in over- 
riding the Constitution of California, as it has done 
in the past, and a majority of the votes of both 
ses of the legislature should he cast for Gillett, 
the question of the eligibility of the Governor would 
be passed on to the United States Senate. Califor- 
nia, as a state, would have nothing to say about the 
matter. 

+ + * 

WHAT THE SENATE would do in the event of 
the appearance of Gillett with manifestly proper 
credentials is hardly problematical. There is one 
very strong precedent for his admission to member- 
ship in that body, if he should lie elected. Nineteen 
vears ago David B. Hill, then Governor of New 
York, was chosen United States senator. In spite 
of loud and prolonged Republican clamor, in which 
Si me Democrats in New York state joined, he re- 
fused to resign as Governor after having been elect- 
ed to the senate. For the first time in historv — it 
was frequently so stated at the time — an individual 

occupied the highest state office 
Constitution as and 'the highest federal ofifice 
a Featherweight within the gift of his state at one 

and the same 'time. No question 
as to his eligibility confronted him when he ap- 
peared in the senate chamber in Washington and 
presented to the clerk of that body his certificate of 
election. The Constitution of New York state was 
a document unknown in Washington. If Governor 
Gillett should be elected to the United States Sen- 
ate and decide to serve as Governor and United 
States senator until the end of his gubernatorial 
term, the people of California probably will find 
themselves as helpless as were the people of New 
York in the case of David IT Hill; for the Constitu- 
tion of California is of as little consequence to the 
powers that may decide to send Gillett to Wash- 
ington as it is to the United States Senate. What a 
glorious feature of the glorious system of our glori- 
ous government ! 

* * * 

A GENTLEMAN named Thomas Williams, dis- 
tinguished in the world of sport as president of the 
New California Jockey Club, has issued the defi of 
the racetrack element on the Pacific coast. It is 
couched in these unequivocal terms: "Our season 
will open on November 7 and will continue as usual 
for many years to come. It is our intention to in- 



-e the purse?, this J - to induce all the 

best eastern stables to bring their stl the 

-t. No serious opposition is anti- 
A "Pipe eipated by OS. Stories of stopping the 
Dream"? racing game have come to me of late, lint 
there is no foundation at all tor them. I 
can only call these rumor- pipe dreams from the 
moon, ,-is I can't see where 011 this planet the. came 
from." Thus does Mr. Thomas Williams, president 

of the New California Jokey — pardon us, it is 

Jockey — Club, instruct at the people of this 

state who have believed that there was some sort 

of a foundation for the stories in circulation to the 

effect that an effort was 1" be made to put an end 
to the chief feature of the racing "game" — in fact, 
to draw its \ cry life blood. 

* + + 

WE SUSPECT that Mr. Williams is a humorist, 
and that he knows it. ( (therwise how can we in- 
terpret his public utterance on the subject of the 

race course in California? The chili's season will 
open, he declares, and will continue "as usual" for 
many years to come. "As usual"! This means, wc 
logically infer, that Arcadia and Kmeryville. twin 
mothers of vice and crime, in the belief of this au- 
thority will remain indefinitely, perhaps forever, 
safe from the interference of the law. Speaking by 
the card, as he doubtless docs, the cocksure presi- 
dent of the jokey organization evidently has been 

givei' to understand, by the poli- 

Nothing ticians who draw their inspiration 

to Be Feared? from the present fountain-head of 

everything that is bad in Califor- 
nia's public affairs, that nothing is to be feared in 
the way of legislative action looking to the abolition 
of gambling, "straight" or "crooked"; in fact, that 
nobody in California has been thinking seriouslv of 
attempting to put a stop to the grossly immoral, 
though not yet illegal, practices incidental to the 
racing season in this state. Strange, isn't it, how a 
gentleman of reasonable intelligence, especially if 
he happen to be a resident of the state, would have 
overlooked or failed to become familiar with the 
fact that racetrack gambling, if such thievery can 
be dignified ( ?) by this term, is one of the planks in 
the legislative platform of the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
Republican League ! 

t t * 

THIS PUBLIC UTTERANCE of Mr. Thomas 
Williams, president of the New California Joke- 
smithy, is an insult to the intelligence of the decent 
people of the state. It reads more like the m titter- 
ings of an irresponsible ward of the state than like 
an expression from a man big enough, even in 
jockey circles, to be chosen as the head of any or- 
ganization whose ostensible aim is the promotion of 
genuine sport. It is an insolent challenge to the 
high-minded forces at work to relieve the state of 
California of the affliction which has 
Insolent been imposed upon it by those who 
Challenge prefer to make their living by the em- 
ployment of processes indorsed bv the 
devil but condemned bv manhood. The charitable 
view to take of Mr. Williams is that he is either a 
recent importation into the state or that he has just 
emerged from a long period of hibernation; for no 
Californian of intelligence, if actuated by an inclina- 
tion to be truthful, would suggest that "stories of 
stopping the racing game" are but "pipe dreams 
from the moon". Mr. Williams will awaken ere 



Pacific Outlook 



long to the truth that what he characterizes as "pipe 
dreams" are very real. He should remember New 
York, Louisiana and — well, pretty nearly all the rest 
of the states excepting California. 

* * * 

LEWIS R. WORKS has been making great 
strides 'toward the Republican nomination for judge 
of the Superior Court. His friends say that he is 
preparing to prove the truth of the ancient saw that 
"the early bird catches the worm." Mr. Works is 
admirably qualified for 'the bench. Not only is he 
well-versed in the law, but he possesses poise and a 
, judicial temperament and is a man of sterling in- 
tegrity. There probably is 
Lewis R. Works's not a fairer-minded man in 
Candidacy Los Angeles. All these are ■ 

traits • and characteristics 
which should attach to the personality of every can- 
didate for judicial honors. In the official position 
which he has filled for some time past he has demon- 
strated his eminent fitness for any office of trust 
and responsibility to which he might aspire. Just 
how he may stand in the eyes of the machine poli- 
ticians we do not know, nor do we care ; but he is a 
man in whom the people generally have great con- 
fidence, a fact which should outweigh all other con- 
siderations except those of legal ability, which he 
possesses in a high degree. 

* * * 

THE EDUCATIONAL campaign being con- 
ducted by the Highway Commission and the Good 
Roads Association has developed into cyclonic pro- 
portions. It is sweeping nearly everything before 
it. With the exception of the campaign in behalf 
of the Owens river bond issue, Los Angeles and 
vicinity have never witnessed a more enthusiastic 
and better planned publicity movement than that 
inaugurated in behalf of the highway bond issue. 
We had believed that practically everybody was in 
favor of the construction of the proposed highway 
system, recognizing its great econ- 
Good Roads omic value ; but by the way these 
Campaign two organizations and those earnest- 
ly co-operating with them have gone 
to work to persuade voters to support the proposi- 
tion we judge that they fear that somewhere, in re- 
mote corners of the county, there remain persons 
who have not yet been converted. The Pacific Out- 
look indulges in the hope that after the bonds shall 
have carried by the overwhelming majority predict- 
ed the fund of three and a half millions of dollars 
will be conscientiously administered by the splen- 
did Highway Commission and a Board of Super- 
visors a majority of whom will be men of the high- 
est integrity, like the minority in the present board. 

* * * 

THE LINCOLN-ROOSEVELT Republican 
League is indorsing for the state legislature men 
who, in our humble opinion, are truly representative 
of the best citizenship of Los Angeles county. We 
have taken the trouble to inquire into the ante- 
cedents and general character of most of the men 
whose nomination has been advocated by the league, 
and so far as our inquiries have gone we find noth- 
ing that indicates that the executive committee of 
the league has been actuated by any other motive 
than a desire to secure for members of the legisla- 
ture from the Los Angeles county districts men who 



may be depended upon to support measures cal- 
culated to advance the interests of 
Right Must the state at large rather than any 
Triumph special interest, and to oppose the 
adoption of measures intended to 
strengthen the tottering foundations of the decay- 
ing political organization maintained by the rail- 
road. If there is any one particular thing for which 
the league is open to criticism it is that it has been 
standing altogether too straight to be immediately 
successful as a politician. ' Some of the more "prac- 
tical" politicians who have been lending their aid 
in the movement think the league should unbend a 
bit, now and then, playing "the game" according 
to the old accepted rules. We think not. It can- 
not fail to attain success if it stand firmly on! prin- 
ciple. "Trades" and "deals" will prove a curse to 
it, will result in its undoing. The league is right, 
therefore it must triumph. 

* * * 

THE AMIABLE "Wayfarer" of the Oakland 
Enquirer pays Los Angeles a back-handed compli- 
ment, following it up by a deft punch which just 
precisely missed the solar plexus. "If Los Angeles 
had been making the progress that Oakland has 
been making," he writes, "the fact would have been 
heralded throughout the United States. For they 
are the greatest advertisers in the world, those Los 
Angelenos. And it is greatly to their credit that, 
by advertising, they have built, out of nothing, a 
great and beautiful city, which is the wonder and 
joy, not only of California, but of the whole country. 
But they never 'miss a trick' in putting Los An- 
geles to the fore. To illustrate : On the last day of 
December, 1889, a trainload of tourists left the city 
of the Angels for San Francisco. Before they left, 

they were solemnly warned not to 

We Never go, because San Francisco was al- 

Miss a Trick ways beset with snow in the winter 

time. And, as Fate would have it, 
those tourists arrived in San Francisco on January 
1, 1890, in the only snow storm that city had had 
in twenty years, or has had since. And, to add in- 
sult to injury, those Los Angeles boomers hired 
some traitorous San Francisco photographers to 
take a picture of the old Palace Hotel, with snow 
heaped upon its window sills. And those pictures 
are still being shown to tourists in Los Angeles as 
illustrative of what happens every winter in San 
Francisco." Alas! how wicked has the City of 
Angels become! And how blind is our friend 
and admirer, the "Wayfarer", to the fact that 
the population of this dreaded municipal rival 
has expanded from a'bout 50,000 in 1889 to 300,- 
000 in 1908! The opening clause of his plaint 
smacks of grapes that are sour. 

* * * 

"IT IS THE DUTY of all good citizens," ex- 
claims the virtuous Sacramento Union, "to do 
everything possible to preserve the integrity of the 
law of the land. The best way to do this is to obey 
the law, of course, but a splendid way to uphold 
the dignity of the system is to see that officers are 
not resisted in the performance of their duties, and 
to lend them aid and comfort if they are in peril." 
It is not likely that any newspaper published in 
California or in any other state will take issue with 
the Sacramento paper on this question. It is edify- 
ing to note the high moral tone assumed by this 



Pacific Outlook 



•II. Putting into ndid 

jirc, ich it h:is given utter- 

The Law's ance, we may now confidently expect 

Integrity t'> see the Union upholding the hands 

e law in San Fran- 
■ arc struj verything possible 

tlu- law uf the hind." 
r than encoui i such efforts. 

Will the Union hi >i the law by 

"lending them aid and when they are in 

peril? Having committed itself to this splendid 
g placed - favoring 

the preservation of the integrity of the law, nothing 
remains for the Union to do exoipt to persist 
in insisting that the best citizenship of the state 
shall "lend aid and comfort" to the office of prose- 
cuting attorney of San Francisco county in its ef- 
forts to vindicate the laws making the bribery of 
public officials a crime. 

+ * + 

WHEN, A FEW DAYS ago, a resident of a 
II city in < Iregon went to the local postoffice and 
presented for collection two hundred and fifty postal 
money orders for one hundred dollars each, he fur- 
nished, in the story of his act, a text upon which a 
powerful argument for a federal postal savings bank 
system niav he built. These orders were purchased 
nearlv a year ago. just prior to the first rumors of 
a financial panic. The man who pinned his faith to 
the United States government apparently had no 
confidence whatever in hanks; 
Faith in and he had sense enough not to 

the Government establish a stocking bank of his 
own. What he desired was to 
put his money in such shape that he could 
have it when he asked for it and not be left 
dependent upon the whims of some bank 
official. By making the government the depositary 
he lost the interest on his twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars and paid fees aggregating seventy-five dollars: 
but he went home content, knowing that the mo- 
ment he demanded the return of his cash it would 
be forthcoming. Like practically every American 
citizen this wise Oregonian has an abundance of 
faith in the integrity of his government. A system 
of postal savings banks in which we all may trust ap- 
pears to approach more closely to a solution of the 
panic problem than anything else. 

+ + * 
TWO VIEWS OF BRYAN 

A Democrat on Bryan 

In discussing the nomination of Bryan the Brook- 
lyn Eagle, one of the most influential Democratic 
dailies in America, says: 

The energy of states he cannot lose and the in- 
ertia or indifference of states he has always lost se- 
cured Mr. Bryan's third nomination, by a union of 
hope and of despair. The states he has never lost 
hope to inspire the states which he has always lost 
to one more effort. The states which he has never 
gained had no opportunity, and had no man, suc- 
cessfully to confront him. They simply succumbed. 
Then the act was made unanimous by the habit of 
politics and by the contagion of attrition and of 
noise. Had Republican administration been con- 
serving and conservative, Mr. Bryan's third nom- 
ination had been hopeless and impossible. 

But Republicanism sought to steal the clothes 



of Bryanism, while Bryanism was in swimming, and 
Bryanism, duplicating the stolen clothes, has re- 

nized in battle arraj 
by a badly simulated li n, which is only :i 

masquerade. The nation owes much that is good 
to Mr. Roosevelt, in his second term. It also owes 
to him his ire in part on some of Mr. Br} 

policies, with the opportunity to Mr. Bryan to in- 
sist, to his party, that it should give to him one 
more chance to try for the rest. If to Mr. Rck 
velt we are indebted for Mr. Taft's fust nomina- 
tion, to Mr. Roosevelt we are also indebted for Mr. 

Bryan's opportuni! third nomination. 

Mr. Roosevelt can be credited, not unjustly, with 
both nominations. 

The nation is confined to ,i choice between two 
men. The Eagle prefers Mr. Taft and will oppose 
Mr. Bryan for reasons which set this paper against 
the latter in 1896 and in 1900, and which are made 
more emphatic by everything in Bryan or in Bryan- 
ism, which has since occurred. 



Bryan's Present Popularity 

Gradually the more conservative leaders of the 
Democratic party, and especially those of the East- 
"ern States, have come into cordial relations with 
Mr. Bryan ; so that he is in a position of favor and 
good standing that he did not enjoy in the conven- 
tions of 1896, 1900 and 1904, says the Review of Re- 
views. In those conventions the strain between the 
conservative and radical wings of the party was so 
severe that much of the energy was wasted in fac- 
tional strife which should have been expended in 
wisely concerted assault upon the opposing party. 
All these things are recalled to mind in order to 
bring out more clearly by contrast the very differ- 
ent position in which Mr. Bryan finds himself this 
year. His party will be more harmonious than in 
any previous political year since he has been identi- 
fied with it. He has made steady growth in ac- 
quaintance and in popular good-will by virtue of 
the exercise of the two professions which he has 
now for a good whiie past been carrying on. His 
chief work has been that of a platform lecturer, in 
which capacity he has been almost everywhere in 
the countiy speaking to large audiences often upon 
subjects not of a controversial sort, and by his elo- 
quence and tact dispelling that strong prejudice 
against him that had survived from the bitter fight 
against free silver. His other calling is that of an 
editor and writer, and his weekly paper has kept 
him in touch with large numbers of his political fol- 
lowers. He is ten times as widely acquainted with 
men in all walks of life as any other member of the 
Democratic party. He is more in demand as a 
speaker than ever before, and his readiness and skill 
as ?.n orator have greatly increased. 
+ + + 
U/?e Race Trachs 

Bv Lvman Abbott, D. D. 

The battle against race-track gambling is part 
of that long campaign, the result of which is that 
gambling hells like that at Monte Carlo and lot- 
teries that impoverish the common people, like that 
formerly maintained at New Orleans, have been 
made first disreputable, then abolished. There is 
only one argument adduced in favor of race-track 
gambling, namely, that it improves the breed of 
horses. The answer to that is conclusive — it de- 
teriorates the breed of men. 



Pacific Outlook 




Greatest of American Poets Incessantly Calumniated 
During His Lifetime 



AMERICANS are preparing to do tardy jus- 
tice to the memory of Edgar Allen Poe, the 
greatest of American poets, on the occa- 
sion of his centenary, which will occur January 19, 
1909. Misunderstood and calumniated during all 
his unhappy life, slandered after his death, not 
appreciated until years after his passing, a century 
after his birth the author of "The Raven" is to 
be honored at the hands of the countrymen whose 
letters he glorified. On this occasion every speech 
and every article directed to a just estimate of his 
life, character and works probably will contain a 
note of. regret for the calumny that unceasingly 
harassed him in life and redoubled in death, when 
his caustic pen was silenced. 

The celebration of the hundredth anniversary of 
Poe's birth has been a favorite project of the liter- 
ary world for several years. It was not without 
research that the actual date was determined. Poe's 
own statements, which in matters of this kind were 
prone to be inexact, are responsible for the con-, 
fusion. When he entered West Point he gave his 
birth date inaccurately, so as to come under the age 
limit. But the researches of Professor Woodberry 
have shown to a certainty that the date is January 
19, 1809, a paragraph in a Boston paper of one 
month later proving it beyond a question. 

Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and New York, 
the four cities in which Poe did most of his literary 
work, will all see commemorative exercises held, 
and in the University of Virginia, whose most famed 
student Poe is, noted giants of literature .will sound 
the praises of the poet. No plans for, observing the 
centenary in Los Angeles have been made, but there 
is no reason why the lovers of Poe's works in this 
city should not undertake the promotion of a popu- 
lar movement to honor the memory of this great 
American on the approaching one hundredth anni- 
versary of his birth. 

In all the injustice done to men of genius, the case 
of Poe perhaps is without parallel. His gifts were 
undoubtedly his curse, for he never realized any- 
thing from them but woe. The imagination that 
enabled him to write stories of horror that have 
never been equaled was trouble enough for any one 
man, but ordinarily they would have brought con- 
solations in the admiration of his fellow men, and 
financial rewards that would have enabled the. 
writer and his wife to live in comfort. Other great 
writers have had fluctuations in their fortunes. 
They have ascended and fallen, sometimes going 
clown because they deserved to, and often the vic- 
tims of injustice. But there were no lights for Poe. 
His whole life was one long misery, the only con- 
solation being the joy he got out of writing prose 
and poetry such as no other American has been 
able to. 

When at the very summit of his glory, as editor 
of the leading- American magazine, his salary was 
only $10 a week. "The Raven," one of the most 
celebrated of all poems, brought but $10 to the au- 
thor, yet today the original manuscript is valued 
at $10,000. In 1869, twenty years after the death of 



the poet in the streets of Baltimorej a copy of his 
poems, in the original boards, was knocked down for 
$1. What it would bring now, on the eve of the cen- 
tennial, is hard to estimate, and even in 1869, the 
same copy, sold for instance in Paris, would have 
brought far more, for the genius of Poe, ignored at 
home, was having its influence on the literature of 
the old world. 

For a quarter of a century after the death of this 
master worker in letters, the enemies of Poe had the 
ear of the world. The poet was scarcely cold in his 
grave before Rufiis W. Griswold had published his 
biography, which bore in every line the hatred the 
biographer bore to the critic who had so ruthlessly 
exposed the literary weakness of his "Poets and 
Poetry of America." Poe and Griswold were 
friends, but the poet, as one of the most noted critics 
in the world, could not stifle his sense of honesty in 
commenting on Griswold's work. He told what he 
thought about it. Griswold had his revenge after 
the death of the author of the "Raven," for the close 
relations of the two men having been known to the 
world led all to believe that what Griswold said of 
Poe must of necessity be correct. 

It was not until many friends of Poe in life, many 
of those who knew his true life in the places men- 
tioned by Griswold as scenes of incredible debauch- 
ery, began their campaign to clear his memory, that 
the world saw the possibility that it had done in- 
justice to the greatest of American literary geniuses. 

Enemies said that he starved and beat his wife in 
order to hasten her death, so that by studying her 
pangs he might get material for exact description. 
Yet her mother, Mrs. Clemm, who lived with the 
pair during their married life, and who knew how 
deeply the poet loved her, bore indignant witness to 
the slander of these stories, and responded with a 
hundred others in rebuttal, showing the man's af- 
fection, the care he had for his wife, of how he 
cooked her meals in her illness when poverty had 
brought them near actual starvation. Mrs. Clemm 
showed that it was the death of his wife that over- 
threw Poe's reason and became .the direct cause of 
the fits of drunkenness that finally resulted in his 
death. Women who knew him spoke of the pecu- 
liarly chivalric manner in which he treated the 
gentler sex, and his men friends told of his reserve 
and modesty and the unaffected humility as to his 
own deserts as a writar. 

Poe lived and. died a mystery to himself, to his 
friends and to the world. His life was a romance, 
his death a tragedy and his fame immortal. Seldom 
has so much genius been allied to so much misery. 
The most interesting and picturesque figure in 
American literature, his strange and romantic life 
possessing an incredible fascination for those who 
have sought to follow it from the time the poet be- 
gan his wanderings as a writer, it is no wonder that 
the approaching centenary has been the occasion 
for reviving a renewed life for the Poe cult. 

Those who go back to investigate find that after 
leaving Boston Poe was adopted by John Allan of 
Richmond, Virginia, which accounts for the fact 



Pacific Outlook 



that, though a Northerner horn, he always had such 

!i and sympath ' 
for it. 

In 1SJ"». when In ■ ! his name for the 

time in the flyleaf of a volume of poems, "Al 
"Tamerlane," University of Vir- 

had been his alma mater: then he went to 
West Point, but the move was a mistake, and after 
spending a few months there he asked his guardian 
to permit him gn. 'The latter peremptorily 

refusing, his own means of ending a 

ne that had become painful to him, and by neg- 
lecting all his studies finally got himself into such 
disgrace that I [Thrown on his own 

'.roes, he took up literature as a means of liveli- 
I, and wrote in rapid succession his wonderful 
mystery, of which "Marie Roget," the 
"Murders of the Rue Morgue," "'The Gold Bug," 
"Black Cat." "Pit ami the Pendulum" especially 
astonished the world. In Xew York he contributed 
to the Xew York Quarterly Review a series of 
searching criticisms; then he went to Philadelphia 
to assume charge of the Gentleman's Magazine. 

His romance with Sarah Helen Whitman is one 
of the most famed chapters of his life. He wor- 
shipped this brilliant woman, and her loyalty to him 
is proved by the vigor with which, after his death, 
she hastened to reply to every one of the slanders 
directed against his memory. Almost alone for a 
long- time she bore his burden of battle against the 
detractors of Poe, and her work is now bearing; fruit 
in the changed attitude of the public mind to him. 

Baltimore, in whose streets Poe was found in- 
sensible in October, 1849, was first publicly to honor 
his memory, and a statue erected there in 187S was 
the first memorial to his memory. Others are cer- 
tain to be the outgrowth of the centenary. 

V V V 

Gems as a Business Barometer 

It is generally believed by people who analyze 
and know conditions of finance and prosperity that 
the diamond merchant and jeweler who caters to 
high-class patronage holds a firm touch on the pub- 
lic pulse — even approximating that of the banker. 

In this connection it is of interest to readers of 
the Pacific Outlook to know that the prices of fine 
gems and precious stones have remained firm and 
undisturbed, a point emphasized by the following 
extract from private advice by mail recently re- 
ceived by Brock & Feagans from their broker in 
London, dated June 20: 

"I have been here several weeks and have gone 
thoroughly through the markets of Amsterdam, 
Paris and London, with the most astounding re- 
sults. Not only are prices on diamonds high and 
firm, but nice clean goods are scarce. Pearls, em- 
eralds, rubies and other precious stones are as high 
as last year, and stocks of the better class of these 
materials are low and very difficult to procure." 

In an interview this week Brock & Feagans as- 
sured the Pacific Outlook that their confidence in 
general and local conditions has been strengthened 
by the unparalleled stability of the gem market, 
which has never wavered. This firm gives assur- 
ance that perhaps Los Angeles and the tributary 
country absorb higher class gems per capita than 
any other community in the entire country. This 
surely indicates that local conditions are sound now 
and always, and also shows an advanced local posi- 
tion in the wearing of choice jewels unexcelled in 
America. 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 
Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

Can you imagine tile future of Lo It 

iday 300,000 nearer ;i million popula- 

tion than it was as years a;.:' There is no question 

ower 

of ii.i the future you should 

rty. Read this: 
"Twenty-live years ago to. lav the school hoard of 
os '''"' eles city, ha i old Spring Street 

school lot on the Ci Spring and Second 

Streets (the present site of the Brj ion Building), 
purchased a 'lot with uo feci fronting on Spring 
Street and an equal one on Broadway (then Fort 
Street) for $12,500. Mercantile Place now runs 
through the property, The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages. The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is 100 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial, Los Angeles Times, June 1, 1908. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. g. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
V ^^^^^^"?!T*" state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Plftfl St. 



Phone P 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



* ; — ; — n 

The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply lo 

Tel. E-1467 



W'H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



10 



Pacific Outlook 




G ROVER Cleveland died a comparatively 
poor man, leaving an estate which had 
dwindled materially during the last few 
years of his life by reason of certain insecure in- 
vestments. Cleveland was a poor man when he 
1>ecame President the first time. He made some 
jnoney through real estate investments in the neigh- 
borhood of Washing-ton. With the savings from his 
salary he bought Oak View, which he occupied for 
a while as a summer home, and other suburban 
property. Then came a boom in land values, and 
lie sold out at considerable profit. His purchases 
gave fashionable importance to the localities where 
they were made and this alone made prices run up. 

Mr. . Roosevelt will leave the White House in 
comparatively easy circumstances and will add to 
the money he now has by magazine contributions 
and the writing of books. Just what he is worth is 
not known, but it is believed to be between $100,- 
O00 and $200,000. 

William McKinley left an estate worth between 
$400,000 and $500,000. By careful management un- 
der direction of George B. Cortelyou, its value was 
■materially increased so that Mrs. McKinley was 
more than well off in worldly goods. 

Benjamin Harrison saved money while in the 
White House, but was not a wealthy man at the 
time of his death. When elected to the Presidency 
lie was worth probably not more than $25,000. He 
lived simply while in the White House and saved 
more than $100,000 during his four years' occupancy. 

Chester A. Arthur was worth $200,000 wben he 
died, that amount being divided between his son 
and daughter ; but it is probable that he was worth 
about as much when he entered the White House. 
He was the' most lavish of our Presidents in his ex- 
penditures, not hesitating to spend from $2,000 to 
$5,000 on a single dinner, and it is not likely that 
lie saved much during his term. His predecessor, 
Garfield, died poor. Mrs. Garfield, however, was 
magnificently provided for by the nation, $300,000 
being raised for her, while her pension of $5,000 a 
year made it a certainty that she should never want. 

Hayes was accused of parsimony during his term 
of office, 'because he offered no wine to his guests at 
state dinners; but the charge was wholly unjust, 
inasmuch as he was as liberal as other Presidents 
in entertaining. He gave one "spread" at a recep- 
tion that cost him $6,000. Nowadays, as is well 
known, nothing whatever to eat or drink is provided 
at White House receptions, not so much as a cup 
of tea or 'a sandwich being furnished. The plan, 
while it seems inhospitable, has the advantage of 
giving no encouragement to dead 'beats and other 
objectionable persons, who would otherwise present 
themselves merely for the purpose df filling them- 
selves with edibles and drinkables free of charge. 
Mr. Hayes, who spent the last years of his life in 
what he called "delightful retirement," left his fam- 
ily well off. 

Grant, during his first term, got only $25,000 a 
year, but at the beginning of his second term the 
pay of the President was raised to $50,000, and he 
bad some chance to save a little out of his salary. 
Nobody seems to know how much he was worth 
when he left the White House. 



Andrew Johnson left a modest fortune, invested 
chiefly in a farm, a mile and a country store in Knox- 
ville and Greenville, Tenn. When he died, it will 
be remembered, he was a senator of the United 
States, having been elected to that body half a dozen 
years after his retirement from the Presidency. 

Lincoln was a poor man when he joined the silent 
majority. Buchanan was well off, and Van Buren 
died rich. In fact, Van Buren was so wealthy that 
he did not bother to draw his salary while he was in 
the White House, but allowed it to accumulate, pay- 
ing .all his expenses out of his own private purse, 
and drew $100,000 in a lump at the end of the four 
years of his term. 

Folk, Fillmore and Pierce were all rich men, and 
left considerable properties when they died. An- 
drew Jackson was impoverished during the last 
years of his life by assuming the debts of his son, 
Andrew Jackson, Jr. At all events, his fortune was 
much reduced, though in his will be managed to 
leave at least one slave to each member of his fam- 
ily, including his infant grandchildren. In most 
portraits of him Old Hickory appears leaning on a 
cane, and he is said to have designated the place 
where the present Treasury Building should be lo- 
cated by thrusting his walking stick into the ground. 

John Quincy Adams died a rich man. He owned 
much property in Boston, as well as a good deal of 
real estate in Washington, including houses and 
stores on Pennsylvania avenue and F street. His 
will, which is preserved in 1 the records of the District 
of Columbia, is of great length, and is notable other- 
wise in more than one respect. It makes no men- 
tion whatever of the Deity or of a future state — a 
remarkable omission in those days — and it men- 
tions the name of the testator as John Quincy 
Adams, Doctor of Laws. The title conferred by 
Harvard gave him great pride. Like Jackson, he 
was very fond of his collection of walking sticks, 
and gave careful directions as to how they were to 
be distributed. 

William Henry Harrison left only a moderate 
estate. He was a man of very simple ways, and 
while President he used to go to market and 'buy 
his own provisions quite often. 

James Monroe died poor. ' His will, probated in 
Washington, is remarkably brief, containing only 
160 words. It leaves $6,000 to each of his daugh- 
ters, Maria and Elizabeth, and his books to his son- 
in-law. He was in debt when he left the White 
House, and, going to New York to practice his pro- 
fession of law, he made rather a failure of it finan 1 - 
cially. 

James Madison was pretty well off at the. time of 
his death, but the money he left to Dolly Madison 
was dissipated by a worthless relative. Congress 
paid her $20,000 for her husband's papers, and this 
amount, which was all she had to- bequeath, she 
willed to her son and daughter. 

Thomas Jefferson, after leaving the White House, 
lived for seventeen years at Monticello, where he 
tried to be a farmer. The business was not profit- 
able, and, partly by reason of the money drain 
caused by an exuberant and never-failing hospital- 
ity, the author of the Declaration of Independence 
was reduced, in his old age, to straits. He was re- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



is library, 
in. 
\V! ne of tin- 

richi worth at 

Mr. i Imittedly a po r man. lie has ab- 

ore than hi- -alary. But for the 
aid tries I'.. he would 

nination. Mr. 

in was a ; it the time he made 

his I speech in CI i 1896, which won 

for li i in a Presidential nomination. Since then he 

making money Fast and is now credited 

with being worth $500,000. From the Commonei 

and his lectures he i- reputed to receive in the 

-Iim.iXH) a year, llis candidacies 

for tin- President have been very profitable to him, 

than even his election would he. 

+ + + 

"Worried 

"Why," asked tin- good man's wife, "are you so 
ightful? You look as if something disagreeable 
had happened." 

"Perhaps," he replied. "1 am foolish to feel as I do 
about it. My congregation has raised a purse for 
the purpose of sending me to Europe." 

"And are you sorry it isn't large enough to enable 
you to take me with you' Don't let it cause you 
to feel depressed. It will he very lonely here with- 
out you, but I know you need the rest, and I shall 
he very sensible. I can spend the summer at some 
quiet, inexpensive place, cheered by the thought 
that you will return refreshed in mind and body." 

"ft is very good of you to look at it in that way, 
my dear. I appreciate your feeling. But the gentle- 
man who made the presentation speech said he was 
*orrv the amount that had been raised was not 
larger so that f might be able to remain away 
longer, and somehow it seemed to me that the ap- 
plause was more hearty at that point than any- 
where else in the course of his remarks." — Chicago 
Record-Herald. 

* * * 

£5j6e Horse E.aters 

Owing to the steady increase in the consumption 
of horseflesh in Vienna, the municipal authorities 
have erected new slaughter houses for Horses. They 
comprise a fine block of brick buildings, covering 
an area of 3.300 square yards. Land and buildings 
together have cost over $200,000. There is stabling 
for 200 horses. The principal building is the great 
slaughter hall, mere than 300 feet in length and 50 
feet in width and equipped with the most modern 
machinery. There are stalls for killing fifty-nine 
animals, each fitted with hoisting apparatus. There 
is also a large double lift, with a capacity of 2,000 
pounds, for conveying the meat to the cooling 
house. Last year 20.225 horses were slaughtered 
in Vienna for food.' Most of it is converted into 
sausages of various brands and flavors. 

* * <• 
LooKing for a Friend 

A woman was looking over some blankets in a 
Broadway store the other day. "I don't want to 
buy," she explained to the clerk. "1 am just looking 
for a friend." 

"I 'hardly think you'll find your friend among the 
blankets," sauvely suggested the clerk. "I looked 
through them carefullv awhile since." 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We almost any part of 

tin- i i i thi •:■ ■ ' ii 

trict. Small p; . like 

rent. Come in and talk witl 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Hatvcy McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 
I 
D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES &FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street . 



PROPERTIES 



B 
U 

s 
I 

N 

E 
S 
S 



■dnfeevbill Sbtrt do. 



MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SKirts 



Phone F 6715 



4 , 1'4!':> SoutK Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INCJ 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets.. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Frxiils 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co.. Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 

ROBERT MADISON, Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle 


bargains 


Only. 


Renla/s, Loa'-.s, 


Investments, 










Insurance 








GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

Real Estate 






Phor 


e F 1466 






902 Security BUg.. Los Angeles 


Col. 



I. 



Pacific Outlook 



Zohe Gentle Spur 

By a Counselor of the Gods 

There really is no reason for doing anything on 
this all too charming earth of ours. Nature, we 
know, works slowly, and the counselor agrees with 
man that art is long. The length of art is, in fact, 
statistical, even to weariness ; for what infinitude 
could contain' the ill-drawn lines on end, we survey 
— framed? There remain politics and power — polite 
and brutal managing. To arrange another's life is 
surely the most delightful of pastimes; especially 
if we think we are directing our own. A happy man 
rules his house and all therein; even his wife; or if 
lc thinks he rules his wife it is the same thing. He 
is pleased, bustling, and inventive. 

There are, however, sorry households where the 
males love the females, and the females adore the 
males, and they are in accord. They do not care 
for society, nor for the play, nor for the wars, ex- 
cept as these latter afford a background for their 
own bliss. Thus they slump mostly into stupidity 
and the poor man becomes less and less active and 
potent in the affairs of the world. He is co.tton- 
wooled indigestively and unchronicled to his last 
snug, posey-bedecked resting- place. Poor creature ! 
Let us pity him. 

Happily there is a remedy. The gods have given 
men a spur. A gentle, attractive, beguiling, titilat- 
ing impediment to complete repose and inertia. 
This motive to action is the glorious lady of discon- 
tent. 

The counselor is advised by the gods that judi- 
cious exasperation is the function of women, beguil- 
ing man from peace, bestirring him from an injudi- 
cious serenity. Perhaps the gods are not careful 
of their diction,, for to exasperate means "to make 
grievous or worse". Any incentive to action could 
not be worse; it must be for better; for what is 
■ heaven 1 without a racket? Therefore let us accord 
our meed of praise even to the petticoat which nags, 
though this unpleasant word be ungentlemanly. 

Rather shall we not say that man's tendency to 
arrive and rest is overcome by a picturesque desire 
for improvement in the lady of the house or com- 
munity? The woman always, whose appreciation 
of more impinges directly upon each man's willing- 
ness to get less for what he does than if he were not 
continuously chasing an illusive petce; an illustory 
peice of mind, body and heart. This illusiveness 
of peice, being the creation of woman, is the wisp 
of straw she playfully but kindly dangles before her 
own man's nose to ke'ep him from a destructive dis- 
content. N.ever was an ode addressed to a man who 
died of content, peacefully wept. 

Glory! therefore, and rejoice, O man, in those 
domestic pills just too large to give you peace, and 
not quite large enough to breed a dangerous seren- 
ity at home; a serenitv that does not ask for more 
inquietude and accumulation of distress. 
* + * 

Epistolary Gem 

There has recently been an outcry against the 
deterioration in modern letter writing, but the fol- 
lowing epistolary triuniiph from a London tailor has 
leveled things up. 

"I have today issued a writ against you," wrote a 
tailor whose letter was produced in Westminster 
county court recently, "for the amount of your 
bill. Trusting for a continuance of your esteemed 
favor, I remain," etc. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from S 1 /^ to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment— 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. NATHANSON 

LADIES" TAILOR 

and — — — ^^— 

HABIT M AKER 

...HigHeat Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 
216 Mercantile Place 











OtD 


■0M 


We 






i Pay 








Special 






Attention 






' To 
Our 




OPTICAL DEPAFH 


rMEIMT 


In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 


We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 


reasonable prices. 


Brigden & Pcdcrsen Co. 


Manufacturing Jewelers. Watchmakers and Opticians 


Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 




SOCIOYJ 



What's the Use 

rd Dunmorc's only fault was the exaggerated 
value that he set upon correctness. He insisted on 
correctness in eating, in dress, in everything. At a 
dinner in Beacon street he told a story about an in- 
correct self-made man. This man was dressing one 
evening to go out. His wife bustled into the room 
before he started to look him over. 

"But. George," she saiil reproachfully, "aren't 
you coins to wear your diamond studs to the ban- 
quet :" 

"No. What's the use'-" George growled. "My 
napkin would hide em any way." 
+ + + 

Mrs C Q. Stanton entertained the following 
guests at luncheon Tuesday at her borne on Whit- 
tier street: Mrs. William M. Lewis. Mrs. lames 1'.. 
Grady. Mrs. W. L. Grav^, Mrs. W. W. Phillips of 
Fresno, Mrs. John W. Kerhp, Mrs. Henderson Hay- 
ward, Mrs. James Harvey Adams. Mrs. Andrew 
Stewart Lobinger, Mrs. Jefferson D. Gibbs, Mrs. 
Bessie McGoodwin of Redondo and Miss Katherine 
Ebbert. 

Mrs. F. T. Wilkes of Avenue 66 invited a few 
friends to meet Prof. Burton of Minneapolis last 
Sunday afternoon. There was an informal discus- 
sion of Ibsen's works and of his meaning of in- 
dividualism. Among' the guests were Mrs. Mary E. 
Evans, Miss Olive Percival, the Misses Foy and 
Miss Miller. 

The engagement of Miss Maude Ewing Ross, 
daughter of Capt. and Mrs. L. A. Ross of No. 628 
Westlake avenue, to the Rev. John M. Ferguson 
has been announced. Mr. Ferguson, who recently 
accepted a charge at Concord. Cal., is a Princeton 
graduate and is descended from a long line of 
clergymen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thilo Becker entertained Saturday 
evening with a reception in honor of Count Bozenta 
and Madam Helena Modjeska. An interesting pro- 
gramme was given, consisting of musical numbers 
by Miss Margaret Horton, Miss Ida Selby, Miss 
Olga Steeb and Messrs. Joseph Riccard and Lester 
Donohue. 

The marriage of Miss Cora Campbell, daughter of 
Dr. M. B. Campbell of No. 1608 Orange street, and 
the Rev. Clarence F. McCall, was solemnized Tues- 
day evening, the Rev. E. C. Norton of Claremont 
officiating. They will reside in Japan, where Mr. 
McCall goes as a missionary. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Newkirk of No. 1548 West 
Twentieth street announce the marriage of their 
daughter. Myra Isabel, to James Lynns Belt, the 
ceremony to take place at their home Saturday of 
this week. The young couple will reside at No. 
1S42 West Washington street. 

The Venice Chautauqua will close Saturday night 
with the production of Bernard Shaw's "Candida". 
The title role will be taken by Miss Cora Foy, who 
will be supported by Percival Aylmer as "Eugene". 



1 he cast of local people, with the exi 

tion ..i Ah-, \\1iiht. \\ hile Miss Foy has bei n 
profound student of the drama she has not attempt- 
ed much in the way of interpreting roles on the 
stage. Her numerous friends in this city are pre- 
paring to give her a warm welcome Saturday night. 

Mrs. C. I.. Givernaud of Ho. 2009 Washington 

street will leave in a few days for New York city 
■•mil the fashionable resorts",,! t | H . East. Mrs. 
Givernaud is a most enthusiastic motorist and will 
arrive in the East in time to witness the ending of 
the ( rlidden tour. 

In honor of Mrs. Josiah Evans Cowles, the re- 
cently elected vice-president of the General Federa- 
tion of Woman's clubs, members of the federated 
clubs of this city will entertain with an elaborate 

reception at the Fhell clubhouse Monday afternoon. 

Miss Laurel Baker of this city served as brides- 
maid at the wedding of her cousin. Miss Grace G. 
Graef of Porterville. Tulare county, and Ames Ul- 
mer, a well-known young business man of the San 
Joaquin and the Sacramento valleys. 

Mrs. J. G. Smiley of No. 1242 East Fifty-seventh 
street has issued invitations for the marriage of her 



<s^;i^ni 




'*: 



So. Broadway 

A. FUSENOT CO. 



Toilet Goods Department 

Bathing Suit Bags 

These bags are in Moire, rubber lined, having 
separate compartments for bathing shoes, cap and 
suit. Shown in brown, blue and black. Price 85c 
each. 

Shampoo Bags 

Wanous' Shampoo Bags, most convenient for 
shampooing the hair — and especially adapted for 
use with hard water. Bags are filled with pure 
herbs. Price 10c each, 3 for 25c. 

Creme Innovation 

50c a Jar 

Creme Innovation is a Skin Food and beauty 
cream — especially desirable just now as a pro- 
tection against sunburn. It leaves the skin soft 
and white, and is a valuable toilet aid, especially 
during the summer months. Contains no grease. 
Put up in porcelain jars. Price, each, 50c. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



daughter, Miss Dorothea C. M. Smiley, to Kent 
Craig Washburn of New York. The ceremony- 
is to take place in St. Luke's Episcopal church 
Tuesday evening, July 21. 

Mrs. R. 0. Osburn of Harvard boulevard, accom- 
panied by her sister, Mrs. M. F. Blakey, and her 
niece, Miss Catherine Blakey, who have been spend- 
ing several months with her, has gone east for the 
summer. 

Miss Haidee and Miss Lela Glasscock of Los An- 
geles, who have been spending a week in Berkeley 
as the guests of their brother, have gone to Seattle, 
where they are to visit several weeks. 

May Catherine Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Smith of No. 2219 Hobart boulevard, will 
leave Sunday for New York, to -accept an engage- 
ment with a company in the metropolis. 

Mrs. Siddie Bell Rhodes of No. 2726 Vermont 
avenue, announces the engagement of her daughter, 
Miss Hazel Bell, to John Hoffman Schissler. The 
wedding will take place July 28. 

The marriage of Miss Stephenson of Menlo Park 
and Ralph Bandini, a young attorney of this city, 
will take place the latter part of this month at Menlo 
Park. 

Mrs. J. Arthur Evans of Hollywood has gone to 
Maryland, where she will remain until the return 
of her husband from London, England, late this 
month. 

Mrs. L. H. Gilmour of this city has been greatly 
entertained while visiting in Oakland. She is a 
house guest of Mrs. R. H. Allen of that city. 

. Mr. and Mrs. I. Wolff of No. 727 California street 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Minnie, to Leon Bradlor of San Bernardino. 

Miss Helen Sprague of Sacramento, who has been 
visiting in Los Angeles for several weeks, has gone 
to Al-Tahoe to join her mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ross Clark have gone to Montana 
for a month, after which they will be guests of Airs. 
Marcus Daly in New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Dunster of Sacramento 
are spending July in Los Angeles and other points 
in Southern California. 

Mrs. Charles S. Gilbert of Altadena is giving a 
tea this (Saturday) afternoon in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Barry. 

Mrs. Ozro W. Childs and Miss Emeline Childs 
.have returned from Paris, where Miss Emeline has 
been at school. 

Miss Cora Harper has chosen July 21 as the date 
for her marriage to Calvin Gibson. 

Mrs. D. F. Fox of Sacramento is visiting friends 
in this city. 

* * * 
Toole's JoKe 

John Lawrence Toole, the most popular low 
comedian of his day, once gave a supper to eighty 
of his friends, and wrote a note to each of them 
privately beforehand, asking him whether he would 
be so good as to say grace, as no clergyman would 
be present. It is said that the faces of those eighty 
men as they rose in a bod)' when Toole tapped on 
the table, as a signal for grace, was a sight which 
will never be forgotten. 




Plan to Visit, 



Yosemite 
Valley 



This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, oc 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 



Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Fine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 



Phone F 5141 



Tenth and Main Sts. 



A Radical Change In 
Furniture Values 

W>e have just established a general price reduction 
covering our entire furniture stock. Selling cost 
has been cut on every article. New values are at 
least io% better than in any other store in town. 
We merely ask comparison. The new selling figures 
will be maintained permanently. Before yon pur- 
chase elsewhere, learn values here. 

Strictly One Price — The Same to All 

Los Angeles Furniture Co. 

631-633-635 S. SPRING ST. between 6th and 7th 



FOR SALE 



A No. 7 Blickensderfer Typewriter, 
in fine condition, almost new. Cost 
$50.00. :: :: :: 

$J5 Cash Gets It 

Call at Pacific Outlook Office 



Pacific Outlook 



15 




"The Thief- 
It irselves I with thai 
ramatic critics. William Winter, 
thinks that "The Thief", Henri Bernstein's fust suc- 
sful play, sliouUl be witnessed by every married 
couple, and more particularly by ever) married 
man. While, as a general proposition, it may be 
sale to say that the American theater-going public 
is weary of "problem plays", it will not soon tire of 
such a problem play as "The Thief". 

The story of this play lias been told repeatedly 
and most persons familiar with what is going on in 
the theatrical world have learned it. What con- 
cerned most Los Angclans. when it was announced 
that this play would be presented at the Mason, was 
the quality of the talent which would produce it 
here. The hypercritical doubtless found some flaws 
in the work of the Frohman company headed by Miss 
Margaret Illington, but to those who, like myself, 
do not always require perfection to afford them a 
reasonable sense of satisfaction and pleasure, 'the 
production of the current week must appeal as not 
merely entertaining but as affording an object les- 
son instructive to both parties to 'the marriage con- 
tract. 

The greatest compliment which can be paid to a 
play of this character is the applause of absolute 
silence which greets many of the most impressive 
scenes. As the climaxes are reached one is more apt 
to find himself in a profound study, endeavoring to 
solve for himself the problem presented by the posi- 
tion in which the young husband, or the wife, finds 
himself, or herself. 

The wife in the audience asks herself whether, 
under the circumstances, the wife of the play was 
even slightly justified in stealing in order that she 
might, as she believed herself to be doing, hold the 
affections of the husband she adores. On the other 
hand the husband in the audience similarly analyzes 
himself to determine exactly what he would do if 
he were the husband of the play. It is hard to de- 
cide which is the more difficult problem presented 
by "The Thief". 

If I were a woman, I might say that Miss Ming- 
ton hypnotized me into the belief that I was passing 
through the experiences which fell to the lot of the 
wife, Yarie-Louise Yoysin. Being a mere man, and 
rather human, I alternately applauded and con- 
demned the husband, Richard Voysin, as portrayed 
by Bruce McRae, for his attitude toward his wife in 
the hour of her tremendous struggle with her con- 
science. I wellnigh forgot the individuality of these 
two artists in the climax of the second act, when 
the sins of the wife found her out; and I can think 
of no word of higher praise that can be bestowed 
upon them. 

The support is excellent, particularly Edward R. 
Mawson as Raymond Lagardes, father of Fernand, 



. ilTcrs himself as a sacrifice for "the thief": and 

Sidnej Herbert, who takes the pari of ,\l. Gondoin, 
the detective, whose deductions were natural but 
imperfect. The mle of Isabelle Lagardes, portrayed 

by Isabel Richards, is a small .me. lint Miss Rich- 
ards lilts it out of obscurity. Leonard [de, as Fer- 
nand, does good work. He has a future. 



The stage at the Mason will he dark next week. 
Edith Wynne Matthison and the Henry Miller \s- 
sociate Players, who were billed to present Charles 
Rami Kennedy's "The Servant in the House", will 
begin their week's engagement August 3. This is 
another problem play which is said to make a strong 
appeal to humanity. 



The resignation of John H. Pdackwood as mana- 
ger of the Belasco theater does not mean his retire- 
ment from the local theatrical field, and for this let 
us be thankful; for Mr. Plackwood has demon- 
strated his fitness for this work, and there is a whole 
lot more of the spirit of good fellowship in his 
makeup than is usually found among those devoted 
to his calling. Los A.ngeles is fortunate in the 
quality of its theatrical managers generally, and it 
doesn't want to lose a man like Mr. Blackwood. He 
will return from New York late next month with a 
company of his own, which will hold the boards at 
the Auditorium. The company will be headed by 
Lewis Stone. 

"The Rose of the Rancho" is enjoying a second 
week's run at the Belasco, in response to the de- 
mand I predicted last week. Though the ranks of 
regular theater-goers have been thinned by the ad- 
vent of the outing season, it may confidently be 
expected that t.ie second week will not witness the 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zbe Start piano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



close of this production; Hobart Bosworth has re- 
turned to the Belasco company to succeed Lewis 
Stone, and without wishing to disparage the work 
of the latter I cannot resist giving expression to 
the opinion that he is better fitted for the part of 
"Kearney". The play moved smoothly after the 
first performance or two, and those who are even 
slightly interested in the history of California should 
witness it. It is one of the best plays seen in Los 
Angeles in many a day, and the Belasco company 
has entered spontaneously, it would appear, into the 
spirit thereof. 



The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, re- 
cently organized by Bruce Gordon Kingsley, who 
conducts it, gave its first concert at the Auditorium 
Friday night. Julius Bierlich is concert master and 
the organization includes about thirty of the best 
known musicians in this city. -At the initial con- 
cert the orchestra was assisted by the Cecilian 
Ouartette. 

D. O. N. 



Relation of the Drama to Real Life 

I once took a country acquaintance to the play; 
it was the first time he had ever been inside a 
theater, writes Henry Arthur Jones in Collier's. I 
found a great pleasure in watching his delight, his 
childish, innocent acceptance of it all as fact, hap- 
pening before his eyes. He enjoyed himself thor- 
oughly until toward the end of the evening, when 
some of the characters, one of whom was supposed 
to be very hungry, sat down to a meal. Have you 
ever watched a stage meal? You know it takes at 
least half an hour to eat an ordinary meal ; but no 
audience in this world would endure five minutes 
spent entirely in eating, much less half an hour. 
Further, the actor being obliged all the while to 
carry on the piece by dialogue, and to do this in so 
distinct a voice that he can be heard by the farthest 
gallery boy, can not give much attention to chewing. 
Any one who takes the trouble to watch a stage 
meal will see that it is the most barefaced pretense. 
Now my country friend had followed the play with 
the greatest delight, had laughed at all the antique 
jokes and tricks of the comedian, had contentedly 
accepted the most astonishingly impossible char- 
acters and had all the while persuaded himself that 
he was seeing a bit of real life. But when he saw a 
starving man and other people with average appe- 
tites sit down and make the merest pretense of eat- 
ing, and get it all over in two minutes, there came 
to him a sad awakening from his illusion. He felt 
that he had been cheated. He could see that the 
theater was not real. He was not a connoisseur of 
character; the most impossible heroism and the 
most impossible villainy had pleased him ; the stal- 
est jokes, the tricks of the comedian, had sent him 
into shrieks of laughter. It had been all so delight- 
ful, so real, till that dinner came. That dinner dis- 
turbed him for the remainder of the evening. 

The behavior of my county friend illustrated the 
whole relation of the average Englishman toward 
the drama. I do not say that the average playgoer 
is quite so innocent or ignorant ; but he equally mis- 
understands the relation of the drama to real life. 
First of all, he mistook it for real life. Elsewhere I 
have shown why such a way of looking at it leads 
to perpetual and increasing disillusions, to the re- 
ductio ad absurdum that the only people who can 



take a delight in the drama are those who know 
little or nothing about it. 

My friend further totally misunderstood in what 
relation the drama stands to real life. And in this 
regard he is representative of the vast number of 
playgoers of the present day. But you will say: 
"Is it not the end and purpose of playing to hold the 
mirror up to nature, to show the very age and body 
of the time his form and pressure? Is it' not the 
test of fidelity to nature, the final test which must 
and will be applied to all plays?" 

I answer: Fidelity to the great permanent reali- 
ties of life, not to passing and casual occurrences, 
not to small and arid facts, is the final test which 
will be applied to plays, to novels, to poetry, to all 
art that deals with the portrayal of human life. 



Twenty-five Years of Grand Opera 

Next October, before the opening of the season, 
the Metropolitan Opera House will have completed 
an existence of a quarter of a century. Its twenty- 
fifth season ended last April. Within this period 
there were two seasons in which the artistic enter- 
prise which it was built to house was quiescent, — 
one because of the destruction of the stage by fire, 
one because the lessees of the theater thought it 
wise to whet the hunger of the public for operatic 
sweets by enforced abstinence. The later portion 
of this second season was filled by a visiting troupe 
in' which the public had more or less of a local in- 
terest, but which was not so intimately associated 
with 1 the institution as the companies which in pop- 
ular speech bore the name of the house. 

Throughout this time, from the opening night in 
'October, 1883, to the expiring gasp of Mr. Conried's 
regime last April, writes the musical critic of the 
New York Tribune, I have occupied stall D-1S on 
the ground floor, as reviewer of musical affairs for 
The Tribune. I have been an observer of the in- 
stitution's vicissitudes from the beginning and a 
chronicler of- practically all of the public doings 
within its walls that have had musical significance. 
I have witnessed the failure of the artistic policy to 
promote which the magnificent theater was built ; 
the revolution accomplished by the stockholders un- 
der the leadership of Dr. Leopold Damrosch ; the 
progress of a German regime which did much to 
develop tastes and ideals which till its coming were 
all but unknown quantities in American life and art; 
the overflow of that regime and the dawn and de- 
velopment of the liberal and comprehensive policy 
which marked the climax of the career of Maurice 
Grau as an operatic director; I have seen, since then, 
the fruits of wise endeavor and astute management 
frittered away by incapacity, greed and presump- 
tuous ignorance, and fad and fashion come to rule 
ag'ain where for a brief but eventful period serious 
artistic interest had been dominant. A new regime 
will be inaugurated in the coming fall. Concerning 
its purposes and policies little is known, for the 
reason that the concrete facts laid before the public 
are little informing and the promises which have 
been made are vague and general and would not 
bring conviction even if history had not taught us 
to put no more trust in impresarios than in princes. 

Lost His Balance 

A wit being asked, after the failure of a bank in 
which he. kept his money: "Were you not upset?" 
replied : "No, I only lost my balance." 



Pacific Outlook 



1 7 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 

Hv PERKZ Fir-. I. II 

Exhibiticns Next Week: 

Blanchard Hall— C. P. Neilsen, Water Colors. 
Steckel's — Local Painters. 

Cumnock Hall — Japanese Prints, Wednesday 
and Saturday, 3 to 6 p. m. 
This time of play For children and of rest For 
work are fortunate enough to gain a > 

tion i> a time of activity for artists, especially those 
who devote their talents to landscape. Most of the 
local painters are scattered oxer the hills and plains, 
- on the channel islands. Mr. and 
Mr-. Wachtel have been For some time in Arizona. 
Grenville Redmond is in Monterey. Miss Gay goes 
in a Fortnight to the East. Miss Gere is in Chicago. 
Mi-s White will pass the summer in Illinois. Miss 
Gerhart and Prof. Judson have gone to Europe. 
One ma\ fairly suppose that Laguna Beach is not 
deserted. Art is brooding over Nature, incubating 
canvases of light to amaze and astonish us later in 
the year. We can hardly hope for any more ex- 
hibitions until the autumn, although C. P. Neilsen 
has opened an exhibit at the Blanchard gallery of 
some of his water colors. This artist has been busy 
at San Gabriel For some weeks. Miss O'Kane has 




Cornwall Hii.j s 

Painting by George Gardiner Symons 

opened her summer classes and is well settled in 
her Cumnock Hall studio. George Cole is working 
at Colegrove and the fortunate portrait painters are 
confined to their studios, not having the excuse of 
rosy dawn to drag them out. Eternity pauses and, 
hushed and expectant, we attend the apotheosis of 
Nature which the gifted wielders of the palette and 
brush shall present to us in framed inspirations in 
the autumn. 

We reproduce this week a landscape, by George 
Gardiner Symons. It is a scene in Cornwall where 
the artist is now at work. He lived for many years 
at Laguna Beach and is well known in this city. 
His paintings have received favorable mention in 
the studio' and he has had two pictures exhibited at 
the Academy in London. His brush work is evi- 
dently strong. Mr. Symons has already gained a 
footing in certain English circles and bids fair to at- 
tain' a noteworthy reputation in London's artistic 
centres. 

Miss Pauline Curran has an exhibition and sale of 
Japanese color prints on view in the attic studio of 
Cumnock Building, No. 1500 South Figueroa street. 
The gallery will be open Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoons from three until six o'clock. This col- 
lection will remain oh exhibition during July. 



Waist Department Presents 

Innumerable 

Dainty Styles at Tempting Prices for the Summer 

Season 

Can you imagine a 
plcasantcr or more 
charming sight on a 
n.irm summer day 
than a pretty woman 
earing a dainty, cool, 
white shirtwaist? It 
imparts to the wearer 
;v delightful freshness 
of appearance unaffect- 
ed by the sun's melting 
rays. 

It is our good for- 
tune to be in a position 
to provide every wo- 
man with summer 
shirtwaists, simple or 
most elaborate, plain 
tailored or artistically 
designed from the sheerest of materials combined 
with exquisitely wrought lace and embroidery, in 
endless variety. The important point is just here — 
the PRICES are so reasonable that you can afford 
to indulge in an extravagant assortment of tnese 
summer necessities. 

"SO/^tTMIWG ^^fc^ DOING" 





BROADWAY 






COR. FIFTH ST. 



Otto Stcincn Supply Co. \ 


\ \M 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and j 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, , 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery J2 
Specialties and Novelties. ^ 


^m 


do il well. 


-i 1 \r\ ! 


210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 


i\j 



DuBois <8i> Davidson 

Furniture Company 



212-214 West, Sixth Street. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



We Quit Business 



High Grade Furniture 
Rugs, Carpets 
Draperies 
Lace Curtains 



AT COST 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds acid Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Perez Field 

"The Northwest. Passage . Being the Record of a 
Voyage of Exploration of the Ship Gjoa in the 
Years 1903-07," by Capt. Roald Amundsen, is a new 
book soon to appear from the press of E. P. Dutton 
and is said to be "the most entertaining among the 
whole of North Pole literature". The book is writ- 
ten with a simple enthusiasm which is enthralling. 
The Northwest Passage, the dream of centuries, 
lias been made. Having lived among the Eskimos 
for 'three years Capt. Amundsen describes -them as 
a friendly and hospitable folk until contaminated 
by the temptations of civilization. He tells the fol- 
lowing sinister incident: 

The previous evening a very tragic event had oc- 
curred at the station. Umiktuallu, the "Owl's" 
elder brother, to whom I have previously referred, 
lived with his wife, three children, and a foster son, 
in a tent pitched a few paces below the Magnet. 
He had in his possession an old muzzle-loading rifle 
he had obtained by barter from another Eskimo. 
He had procured balls, powder, and caps from us. 
He was accustomed to leave the weapon loaded, 
which indeed in itself was not very dangerous, but 
in spite of our repeated advice he had not removed 
the caps. That evening, when he and his wife were 
visiting another family, his foster son and his own 
eldest son got hold of the rifle. Then followed what 
so often happens when boys play with weapons with- 
out having been shown how to use them properly; 
they were ignorant of their danger, the gun went off, . 
and Umiktuallu's son. who was only seven years 
old, fell down dead. The father heard the shot and 
rushed to the spot. At the sight of his own dead 
son, and the foster son sitting with the smoking 
weapon, he was seized with frenzy. He carried the 
horror stricken boy out of the tent, stabbed him 
three times through the heart with his knife, and 
then kicked him away. Wiik was a witness of this 
terrible scene from the Magnet. The seven-year-old 
lad was an exceptionally bright and clever little 
fellow; he was really quite a hunter, and with his 
bow and arrow brought quantities of game to the 
house. Umiktuallu was exceedingly fond and proud 
of him. Both boys were buried that night, we did 
not know where. With time and reflection Umik- 
tuallu calmed down and was seized with remorse. 
When I entered the camp the next evening he and 
his family had gone over to the mainland. 



Duffield & Co. will publish in the autumn a new 
book by Elinor Glyn called "Elizabeth Visits Amer- 
ica". In this volume the author will incorporate 
the impressions received during her. recent visit to 
this country and to this coast. 



Still another Ibsen manuscript has been brought 
to light, a romantic tale called "Song at Akershus", 
Akershus being the name of a fortress in Christiana. 
The story dates from the playwright's early years. 
It is said, by the way, that there has been talk of 
turning his house into an Ibsen museum, but that 
his widow is disinclined to have the project carried 
out just now. 

The Paris correspondent of "The Athenaeum" 
states that M. Maeterlinck is working at his home 
in Normandy on his new drama, "Marie-Magde- 



IMPERIAL 


V A LLE Y 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 


)0x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftus &l Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




Established 1889 



Phones Home Ex 531 
Main 7715 



TROY 
lAVSVRY 

THE 

\ BEST 



Largest Steam Laundry in 
Southern California 



Troy Laundry 
Company 

Corner 14th and Main Streets 

Uptown Offices 12314 W. 3rd. 
223 "W. 5th. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE S DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Artistic Designs 
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. ''"k^r/Wr 




Pacific 

what this 
hint. the - itter of. the play is 

and the new work lias nothing I 
with Monna Vamia', which marks an 

ird reality and 
drama n I his play is to be 

acted next winter. 



Outlook 



19 



New Books at the Public Library 

♦The Pardoner's Wallet, by Samuel McChord 

,i\ -". The 
writer is well known to n the Atlantic 

thly. He treats of "Unseasonable Virtues", 
"Prejudices", "Fallacies" and the "Cruelty 

In speaking of the value of time in hu- 
man experience he says: "In a timeless existence 
there would be n.> distinction between now and 
then, before and after. Yesterdays and todays would 
be merged in one featureless Forever. When we 
met one another it would be impertinent to ask, 
"How do you do?' The chilling answer would be: 
■ not do; I am.' There would be nothing more 
l" say to one who had reduced his being to such 
bare metaphysical first principles." 
"An open-minded editor prints the following ques- 
tion from an anxious reader in regard to a serial 
story appearing in his paper: 'Docs it make any 
difference in reading the serial whether I begin 
with Saturday's chapter and read backward toward 
Monday, or should the tale be read as the chapters 
appear?' The editor assures his subscriber that the 
story is of such uniform excellence that it would 
read well in either direction. In practical affairs 
our dramatic instinct will not allow us this latitude. 
We insist upon certain sequences." We need time. 

The Influence of the Stars, by Rosa Baughan 
(Regan Paul, 1904), treats of astrology, palmistry 
and physiognomy in 'three chapters which are 
sketches of the subjects, rather than manuals for 
serious students. The chapter on the influence of 
the fixed stars will be of interest to many astrolo- 
gers, as little is known on 'the subject. A chapter 
on moles is curious, and one also on alfridaries, 
which is the period of seven years during which a 
planet is supposed to reign in any given life. 

*The Prolongation of Life, by Elie Metchnikoff 
(Putnam's, 1908). This is a valuable and interest- 
ing book covering a wide field of investigation. It 
deals with bodily health and the philosophy of op- 
timism. His method of prolonging life is to corn- 
bate intestinal putrefaction by the introduction into 
the organism of cultures of the lactic bacilli, as 
formed in various preparations of milk. He speaks 
in another section of the book of somnambulism as 
a reversion to a stage of animal consciousness. 
Part VIII is devoted to a study of Goethe and the 
development of his view of life from pessimism to 
optimism. Prof. Metchnikoff claims that morality 
in the last resort must be based on scientific knowl- 
edge and that a mother who brings up her child 
badly through lack of knowledge of what is best 
for it is an immoral woman, no matter how sym- 
pathetic she may be. The author's ideal "is ortho- 
biosis, that is to say, the development of the human 
life so that it passes through a long period of old 
age in active and vigorous health, leading to the 
final period in which there shall be present a sense 
of satiety of life, and a wish for death", — an instinct 
for death. Speaking of government he says: "It is 
easily intelligible that in the new conditions such 




Exclusive 
Woman's Halter 
French and Eng'lisK Models 
Special Creations for the Individual Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 




portraits bg 
pjotajrapljg 



Phone 
EI3IS 



HANA ROBISON 

Residence Studio— 2323 West Ninth Street 

Sittings by Appointment 




Ladies' 
Tailor 



Every garment made in my establishment is de- 
signed to suit the characteristics of each customer. 
My price and workmanship cannot be duplicated in the 
city. A call will convince you. 



903 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER.. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orier on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 

ioo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35.00 

250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10.000 " - 280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



modern idols as universal suffrage, public opinion, 
and the referendum, in which the ignorant masses 
are called on to decide questions which demand 
varied and profound knowledge, will last no longer 
than the old idols. The progress of human knowl- 
edge will bring about the replacement of such in- 
stitutions by others, in which applied morality will 
be controlled by really competent persons." He 
thinks that the votes of young men are dangerous 
to the state. 

Among the books added to the library this week 
there are none of very notable interest. There are 
three volumes of biography — Napoleon, by Lenz 
(Putnam), a translation from the German which 
seems a little heavy; Life and Times of Stephen 
Higginson, by T. W. Higginson (Houghton) ; and 
William Thomas Arnold, by Mrs. Humphry Ward 
and C. E. Montague (Manchester Press 1907), 
which is the record of the fruitful life of a journalist. 

Fire Fighters and Their Pets, by Alfred M. 
Downs, a nursery book well illustrated with "O 
My!" pictures. 

Sojourning, Shopping and Trudging in Paris, by 
C. O. Williams (McClurg 1907), is an admirable 
little guide arranged particularly for women, and 
Dame Curtsey's Book of Novel Entertainments for 
Every Day in the Year, by E. H. Glover (McClurg 
1907), tells women how to garnish hospitality. The 
dishes photographed look both appetizing and fussy 
— eye feeders with more feathers than squab. 

Historic Churches of America, by Nellie Welling- 
ton, is a sort of popular archeology romancing about 
seventy churches in this country. Political theory 
and practice are discussed in The New Basis of 
Civilization by Simon N. Patten (McMillan 1907) ; 
in Public Ownership and the Telephone in Great 
Britain, by Hugo R. Meyer (Macmillan 1907) ; and 
in- The Elements of Business Law, by Ernest W. 
Huffcut (Ginn 1905). 

There are four new books on Art, all of which 
have a local and special interest chiefly for students. 
They are The Art of the Dresden Gallery, by Julia 
de Wolf Addison (Page 1907) ; The Frescoes in the 
Sistine Chapel, by E. M. Phillipps (Du'tton 1901), 
valuable for its illustrations ; Sienna, Its Architec- 
ture and Art, by Gilbert Hastings (Brentano), an 



illustrated essay merely ; and British Contemporary 
Artists, containing sketches of the lives and works 
of seven modern painters — Watts, Leighton, Orch- 
ardson, Poynter, Millais, Burne-Jones and Alma- 
Tadema. 

The Ethics of Force, by H. E. Warner, is an anal- 
ysis of patriotism and the right of war. The Mys- 
tical Life of Ours, by R. W. Trine, contains a series 
of selections from works of the author, arranged 
for weekly readings.- 

The Natural History of the Ten Commandments, 
by Ernest Thompson Seton, derives the morality 
of the decalogue from the actions of animals. It is 
an essay on the curiosities of being good. Man has 
the piety of dogs, which is creditable to both. 

The Man from Mars, by William Simpson, is a 
curious volume of speculation, visionary and in- 
clined 'to be prophetic. 

The Repulsion Theory is a pamphlet by Arthur 
Percival Knight published in Los Angeles. 

*Books recommended. 

.As Far As He Dared 

A couple of city men were playing golf when they 
saw an old gentleman looking at them wistfully. 
They asked him to join the game, which he did with 
alacrity. He was mild in speech and manner and 
played well. But once when he had made a foozle 
he ejaculated vehemently the word : 

"Assouan.!" 

A few moments later, when he had made another 
bad play, he repeated: 

"Assouan.!" 

The fourth time he said this one of his new made 
friends said : 

"I do' not want to be inquisitive, but will you tell 
me why you say 'Assouan' so often " 

"Well," said the old gentleman, "isn't that the 
biggest dam in the world?" 

He was a Presbyterian clergyman. 
+ 4» «l» 
SHe Had "Made Good" 

"Can you be trusted with a secret?" he asked. 
The woman drew herself up proudly. "You have 
known me for ten years, haven't you?" she replied. 
"Yes." "Do you know how old I am?" — Philadel- 
phia Ledger. 




HAM MOCKS 

E would extend a most cordial invi- 
tation the many readers of the Out- 
look to come in and inspect our immense 
stock of Hammocks. As in years past, we 
are only showing hammocks of good qual- 
ity. Even the cheapest are selected with 
great care, that we may give full value even 
to those who may come with not o'er full 
purses. In buying under our big roof one 
has the advantages of an almost unlimited 
stock to select from, including not only the 
favorites, but a greater variety of new ideas 
and styles than we have ever had the good 
fcrtune to secure before. 

"The pleasure will be ours, if we may but show you." 



Both Phone Exchanges 87 



138*140-142 South Main St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Awahening 

BV DOKOTBV RCSSKl L I.FWls 

1 thought it past repaii 

heart, unfi 

tree 

id retrain. 
M% >ng in me 

breast, 

return [or this, thy ministry. 
ith heart am 

♦ + + 

Sea Monsters 

ark bathes in the summei 
By the sandy Jersey shore. 
Atnl an inky squid and a stinging ray 
: they will have his; £ 

mes t.> their call to arms 
And a Pol il war, 

Anil the dogfish hark at the bold loan shark 
As he bathes on the sandy bar. 

the swordfish draw and the seahorse neigh 

And the dnnntish set to drumming!" 
He wallows away in the nice clean spraj 

And lie doesn't know what'- coming, 
The wavering - • its wings. 

And the - wildly wave him, 

Hut the Jerseacow ■!- angered now 

And nothing on earth can save him. 

.ray crab catches him under the tide. 
An 1 the dogfish snap at his Ik els. 
And tlie y- shock him stiff with a current supplied 

By a school of electric eels. 
Then off they swim, to a funeral march 

flayed on a comb by a merman, 
Anil bury him dank in the uttermost bank, 
While a puff fish preaches the sermon. 

— Newark Evening News. 

* ♦ * 

Tourist and trie High-priced Candles 

A tourist was shown to a room in a hotel in 
Brussels, where he found twenty candles stuck in 
a chandelier. As it was dark, the attendant lighted 
them all ; but the guest had been in continental ho- 
tels before and made him put them out immediately. 

This was of no avail, 'however. In his bill next 
day he found them charged, "Twenty candles, 10 
francs". 

The tourist thereupon went back to the room and 
took out all the candles, wrapped each one in pa- 
per, and put them into his pocket. 

When he was about to leave the house he found 
the servants drawn up in two lines in the hall, ten 
man servants on one side, ten maid servants on the 
other, all smiling and ready for his expected tip. 
Then he drew out his package and distributed the 
candles, one to each. 

"Allow me. monsieur," he said with a bow; "per- 
nie. mademoiselle. They are very superior candles. 
I assure you, I paid half a franc apiece for them," 
and he left them all staring at the candles in their 
hands like so many altar boys. 

Recog'nized Him 

"Uncle Hank" Allen was perhaps the smoothest 
and most accomplished liar in the San Joaquin val- 
ley. The old man's lies were so smooth, so artistic, 
that while listening to them you could easily imag- 
ine yourself listening to Elder Perkins's Bible stor- 
ies or Calhounian explanations. One day a lot of 
us were in Uncle Hank's grocery talking about po- 



litics. The old tr.ai i his head thought- 

fully and began : 

"Boys, you don'l m rte of rou seem to know any- 
thing about the i 

bugs. You many think I am a liar, but I've had 
potato hugs walk right into m\ kitchen and yank 

red-hot potatoes right out o iven. One of you 

fellers says he's seen 'em waiting around a pi 
patch for a second crop, \\ hat's nothing," he 

went on with a sneer. "I was up at Simmons's 
the other day and blast me ii 1 didn't see potatei 
ually lookin' over Simmons's bunks ;,, see 
who had ordered potatoes for next year. I did. by 
glorj ." 

The entire crowd was Still when Uncle I lank I'm 

ished. You could have heard a gum drop.. Finally 
a tall. Kan Fellow, a stranger from Citronia, raised 
himself up from the door. Pointing his linger at 
Allen he exclaimed dramatically: 

"Sir. \ mi are a liar." 

Uncle Hank looked over his glasses at the strang- 
er long and earnestly. Then, advancing toward 
him, he held out his hand graciously and, with a 
puzzled look on his face, inquired : 

"Where ditl you get acquainted with me?" 
* * * 

Our Sea Oil Wells 

Of all the oil fields in the world, from the steppes 
of the Caucasus to the plains of Utah, where the 
latest and most productive field is being prospected, 
the most remarkable is that at Summcrland, Cal., 
where nearly two hundred wells are being pumped 
in the surf of the sea. 

Back of the little town on the beach and on the 
mesa there are other wells, scores of them, but they 
are like the other oil wells of California, gaunt, 
skeleton derricks, with pump arms rising and fall- 
ing to the stroke of the engines in the pump houses, 
says Technical World Magazine. 

In 1896 the first oil well ever drilled in the sea 
was sunk from a low wharf over the Summerland 
surf. It struck oil, and was immediately followed 
by other wells as soon as companies and individuals 
could get hold of frontage from which to extend 
their wharves into the ocean. In June, 1900, the 
banner year for this field, there were at Summer- 



SIX PER CENT. GOLD BONDS 

of the American Petroleum Company 

At par, with an equal stock bonus. A choice in- 
vestment security with strong profit features. 

Fielding J. Stilson Co. 

Financial Agents 
305 H. W. Hellman Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



619 



Japanese and Oriental 

ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS AN<D EMB'ROI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kat\iuchi Bros. ££L» 

533 South Broadway 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



land 305 producing wells, fifty-nine abandoned wells 
and fifteen wells which were in process of drilling. 

These wells yielded from one to sixty barrels of 
oil a day, the average being about five barrels. The 
field has never had a gusher and has never been a 
heavy producer in any sense of the word. In 1889 
and practically in 1890 oil was worth 90 cents a bar- 
rel in Summerland. The cost of production from 
the surf wells is said to range from 25 to 35 cents . 
a barrel. 

Development continued up to 1903, since which 
time the sea field has been practically at a standstill, 
the wells in the territory being pumped, but no new 
ones put down. At the present time there are about 
190 wells producing from the surf of the 415 which 
have been drilled since the field was discovered. 
Fourteen companies are operating in the Summer- 
land district at this writing. 

* * * 

Wonders of the Thornless Cactus 

Luther Burbank, who has illumined the world 
with floral sunshine and made men glad because of 
the fruits and vegetables he has coaxed from the 
earth with scientific genius that spread his name and 
fame throughout the nations, is about to com- 
mercialize his "greatest triumph." He proposes to 
feed man and beast on cactus plants. The cactus 
plant is of value because it can be grown' on land 
that will not produce alfalfa. Mr. Burbank esti- 
mates that 3,000,000,000 acres of unproductive soil 
throughout the world may be utilized to yield the 
new plant. 

Fruit from the cactus will have great commercial 
and economic value. The fruit may be canned, 
pickled, preserved, made into syrup, or find a ready 
market in the fresh state, and the leaves of the plant 
may be eaten by man boiled as greens, fried like an 
eggplant or eaten as a salad. Mr. Burbank and his 
aids have eaten the products of the plant in every 
style and know that they are good. 

For human beings the product of the cactus is 
said to have more food value than any other vege- 
table, containing more of the minerals and salts — 
iron, postassium, manganese, calcium, magnesia and 
soda — that are upbuilders of the nerve cells. 

The thornless cactus will be ready for the market 
in the spring of 1909, when there will be half a mil- 
lion of the plants flourishing. Some idea of their 
present value may be gained from the knowledge 
that Mr. Burbank sold five leaves for seed to an 
Australian company for $5,000, with the proceeds 
from which he built a new bungalow at Santa Rosa. 
— Chicago Record-Herald. 

* * * 

The Penny "Theater" 

Zed H. Copp, chief probation officer of the Washington, 
D. C, Juvenile Court, has been making investigation of 
the penny theaters with a view to determining their ef- 
fect on the large number of children in attendance 
on them. The Washington Star reports Mr. Copp as 
saying: "The general tone of these places, public as they 
are, is not good for the junevile mind. There should be 
some regulations providing against the presence of chil- 
dren there. That should be done either by charging an 
admission fee, or making a law prohibiting children under 
a certain age from visiting them. While there is nothing 
so bad as to be in violation of the law, there is still the 
immoral suggestiveness, and the things seen and heard 
in these places make a deep impression on the youthful 
mind. These places should have the same regulations as 
saloons, so far as they affect children. 1 ' 




i \ mih i^^^^^^^^^^m 




i\^iWlTTLCT£ 



Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



^ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 




X Dlt'l'JM 



Goorgm Bakor JkJndmram 

coiTon 



A Southwestern Weekly 



H. C. Jickerly 

PRCSIOCNT 



* uhtlMh+H ovory Saturday 
llMMf Build rig, to* Jingrlr*. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription pricm Sl.OO a yoar In adoanco. Slnglm copy S 
contt on alt nwu-s standi. 

1-claaa matter April <, k^:". »t the pmtorrice at Lot Angelei, 
( • ■, oader tbe act of Congrett of March |, 1S79. 

Tbe Kdltor of the Pacific Oitlook cannot guarantee lo return manuicripla 
i*oj(b be will endraror to do io if itampi for tbit purpote are incloied with them 
If four vanuatript ii valuable, keep a cop] 



Vol. 5. 



Los Jingeles, Cat.. July 25, 1908 Mo. 4 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 
The Pacific Oatlook la mailed t *► BBbacrttWH tarooffh «i«e 

Laa Aniyele* Pout Office every Krldny, nnd Mhmild be de- 
livered in erer? pnrt of Ibe elly by Saturday's poat. if for 

>• it » r.-ji-mi It mIkmiIiI he drill > ed. OT lie delivered In pour 

cumin ion, Babaerlbera Mill coafer a Cavov ui>»n tbe publlxberM 
by chinu them Immediate aotlce. 



X 5*3* iO*$Oc *C3*++ SGHGi 30$30$ JOfOft 

* A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

S How much grows everywhere if we do but wait! 
■t Not a difficulty but can transfigure itself into a tri- 

S umph: not even a deformity but, if our own souls 
have imprinted worth on it, wUl grow dear to us. — 
X Carlyle. i 

+xxxxxxxx*xxxsiX3ixx* 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
\\ HAT A LAMENTABLE state of affairs when 
such an oranization of citizens as the Chamber of 
Commerce feels impelled to rebuke the City Council 
for its failure to take action in the matter of per- 
mitting the voters of the city to adopt or reject the 
late proposed City Charter! Seldom, if ever, in the 
history of American municipalities can we find a 
precedent for the course adopted by the council. 
After having authorized a commission to revise and 
prepare for submission to popular vote a new char- 
ter the council refuses to allow the matter to come 
In fore the people. Obdurate, thick-skinned, im- 
pervious to a practically unanimous 
Its Mess popular voice, without regard to the 
of Pottage wishes of the most completely repre- 
sentative civic organizations, tacitly 
declaring its own irresponsibility, apparently actu- 
ated by motives masquerading beneath a diaphanous 
veneer composed of one part public policy to ninety- 
nine parts political chicanery, trembling lest the 
cheap ward politician be shorn of his power to con- 
tinue to keep public office almost entirely within a 
realm whose boundaries already have become ob- 



scure — the kingdom of the "bi ss" and the "heeler", 
council has traded its integrity for a mess of 
pottage which stinks to the heavens. What further 
argument i> demanded in proof of the contentio 
intelligent and int men that municipal 

eminent by ward representation must go if the city 
is to be saved t> i the pe< iple ? 
+ * * 
["HE COURSE of the council was most obviously 
the outcome of one of those political "deals" which 

have made the present municipal legislature a dis- 
grace to the city and the subject ol apology to 
students of civics who come to us from other quar- 

ters. < hie of the members of that body, CoUncilm m 
Lyon, who had opposed die submission of the ques- 
tion of a new charter to the people, at the eleventh 
hour voted witli the minority, doubtless knowing 
that the proposal would be rejected. Mr. Lyon is 
said to be a candidate for the nomination for the 
supervisorship in his district. It is logically to be 
concluded that by casting his vote in favor of the 
plan demanded by the people he hoped to gain per- 
sonal prestige and advance his candidacy. 
First The tactics pursued are quite apparent. It 
Aid is politicians of this easily recognized type, 
men who arc either unable to discern the 
tendency of the times or who are indifferent to pub- 
lic opinion, aiming to harvest a big crop of pres- 
tige while the sun shines, who have made the pres- 
ent system of municipal government a reproach to 
the community. In our opinion, which we have 
hitherto expressed, there is but one solution of the 
vexing problem which now confronts the people of 
Los Angeles. This is the immediate invocation of 
the initiative clause in our present charter to the 
^m\ that the people may be permitted to say for 
themselves whether, the ward representation fool- 
ishness shall be further indulged in or not. In then- 
present frame of mind we believe the majority of 
voters will register am emphatic protest against the 
continuance of the antiquated system yet in vogue 
in this city, if allowed an opportunity to do so. 

V V V 

WHETHER the City Council acted wisely or 
not in repealing the ordinance prohibiting "free 
speech" on the streets without police permit time 
will tell. In response to a noisy clamor for the 
restoration -of this "right", as practically unre- 
strained public speaking is declared by local social- 
ists to lie, the inhibition has been lifted and here- 
after all persons, whether they be socialists, an- 



Pacific Outlook 



archists, Oriental agitators or Mormon missionaries, 
will be privileged to address such crowds as they 

•may induce to assemble almost anywhere in tlie 
city, so long as the police department do not make 
the discovery that street traffic is being impeded. 
The constitutional guarantee regarding freedom of 
speech most assuredly should not be placed at 
naught ; such liberty as the organic law promises to 
the people should never be denied them ; but we be- 
lieve that an ordinance can be so framed 
Delicate as to give to street orators their consti- 
Problem tutional rights, and still preserve to the 
whole people the free and unrestricted 
use of .the public parks and thoroughfares. The 
problem is a big one — too great to be disposed of in 
a moment. Every person should be entitled to ex- 
press his political and religious beliefs freely, but 

. this does not mean that ever}' individual and every 
assemblage of individuals should have the right, at 
any and all times, to make use of the property of 
the whole people without the consent of the people. 
The Constitution guarantees the freedom of the 
press as well as freedom of speech. But when the 
press trespasses upon the rights of others the law 
calls it sharply to task. So it should be in the case 
of what we call free speech. Men have a right to 
their opinions and to the free expression of such 
opinions. But should men be allowed to gather 
when they please, upon public property, without the 
consent of the owner of such property? It is a deli- 
cate question just now. 

* * * 
THE LOS ANGELES Herald, the only Demo- 
cratic paper in the city, charges, by inference, that 
"the decent element of local Democracy is not al- 
lied with the Harper administration," and places 
upon the mayor's shoulders the responsibility for 
the failure of the police department to enforce the 
laws relative to houses of ill-fame, which flourish 
as never before under the present malodorous ad- 
ministration. For a long time, under its present 
management, the Herald refrained from censuring 
Mayor Harper for any of his apparent derelictions. 
It has accorded to him the greatest consideration. 
It has been exceedingly patient — more so than most 
of the critics of the administration. 
The Reign But when, after long-continued un- 
of Folly availing efforts to persuade the mayor 
that his duty lay in the direction of the 
enforcement of the law, the Herald became con- 
vinced that the administration did not intend to at- 
tempt such enforcement, its attitude changed. A 
rebuke from within his own political party ought 
to mean something to the executive. It were well- 
nigh inconceivable that one possessed of his intelli- 
gence should not comprehend the supreme folly of 
permitting his course in this matter to be dictated, 
as it evidentl}' has been, by a desire to please those 



institutions and individuals whose ascendancy is 
inimical to the welfare of the public. That Mayor 
Harper and his Police Commission have so long re- 
mained blind to the probable outcome of their reign 
of folly almost surpasses belief. 

V V V 

"THE STATE Democratic managers appear to 
be cocksure," according to a political writer in one 
of the Los Angeles papers. "I am surprised at their 
confident tone. They base their main reliance on 
the split in the Republican party in this state. The 
Bryan managers in the East are frank in saying that 
they expect to take advantage of the Lincoln-Roosc- 
velt movement, and count on carrying California." 
This is edifying. It is the first information we have 
had that there is a split in the Republican party in 
California. O'ne would naturally infer, from the 
foregoing, that the ,Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican 
League is the child of an independent movement. 
The few "machine" newspapers remaining in the 
state are losing no opportunity to attempt to con- 
vince the rest of the country that the Republican 
party in California is divided against itself. This, 
however, is not the case. The Lincoln- 
Born of Roosevelt movement is a project entirely 

Satan within and of the Republican party. 
aimed at the restoration of the party to 
the Republicans of the state, rather than that it 
shall forever remain a chattel of the Southern Pa- 
cific political bureau of which one William F. Ilerrin 
is the head, the heart and the soul, if such an insti- 
tution can truthfully be said to possess such a thing 
as a soul. Every voter affiliating with the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt Republican League is pledged to support 
Taft for the presidency. Taft is the original candi- 
date of the league. The league was working for 
Taft for months while the "machine" was attempt- 
ing to secure a delegation favorable to an ar.ti- 
Roosevelt candidate. The "split in the Republican 
party" wail won't bear investigation. It is an out- 
pouring from the father of lies, the fountain-head 
of evil, the prince of darkness, the promoter of dis- 
cord — the genius popularly depicted as having a 
cloven hoof and a forked tail. 
* * * 

IN SPITE of the contrarieties of opinion regard- 
ing the direct result of the investigation at Whittier 
and the wisdom or unwisdom of Trustee Desmond's 
having precipitated the inquiry without first having 
thoroughly prepared his case, one thing is clear : 
conditions in the administrative department of that 
institution have not been what they should be. This 
is evident enough. Possibly the worst has been 
smothered. Judging from the newspaper accounts 
of the manner in which the investigation was con- 
ducted, one is led to the conclusion that the con- 
mittee of inquiry, consisting of members of the 
State Board of Charities, viewed itself in the light 



Pacific Outlook 



mony of the character admitted in 
The Truth trials before the liar. In our humble 
Will Out judgment the i in declii 

ermit Mr. Desmond to introduce 
all the evidence at his command, of whatever na- 
ture, gravely erred. The object of the investigation 

ild have been the uncovering not only of all the 
itainable, but likewise of every 
sible clue leading to the discovery of possible 
,ler< n the par; of Superintendent Greeley 

and any of the employes at the reformatory. With 
all due respect to the gentlemen into whose ban. Is 
the investigation was intrusted we are prompted to 
express the conviction that the inquiry was little 
better than a farce. It certainly was very far from 
thorough. It i- to be hoped that Mr. Desmond has 
not become discouraged over the result of tbe "in- 

igation". If be believes tbat be is on tbe right 
track he may be depended upon to work relentless- 
ly until tbe truth is out. 



T1IK( IUGH Gifford Pinchot, chief of tbe forestry 
bureau, the interest of the people of California in 
the eucalyptus tree is growing. He has given us 
ample food for reflection. He has opened up a vista 
through stately groves that is fascinating. The 
eucalyptus tree, as most residents of Southern Cali- 
fornia know, will thrive amazingly with little rain. 
We also have had a hazy idea that this tree is ex- 
tremely valuable, but until Mr. Pin- 
Eucalyptus chot sat down and figured out some 
Culture of the possibilities in its culture we 
were in the dark as to details. With 
trees planted eight feet apart an acre of land will 
hold 676 trees. You can figure it out for yourself 
if you want to know how many trees can be grown 
on any specified area. Then ascertain the market 
value of the average mature tree, do a little more 
figuring, and we predict that you will become, at 
once, an enthusiast on the subject of eucalyptus 
culture. It is bound to be a big industry in the 
semi-arid regions of California. And the pioneer 
will be the one who reaps the greatest reward. 

t 4 4 

A JUDGE of the United States Circuit Court in 
Chicago, a jurist whose decisions and opinions in 
the past have been recognized as having been based 
upon principles of fairness under all circumstances, 
has declared that "if it be lawful to make the ex- 
change of railroad transportation for advertising 
then it would be unlawful to do the same in every 
transaction, and the railroad business might law- 
fully become one of barter and sale, limited only by 
the demand.'' In other words Judge Kohlsaat con- 
demns as illegal the issuance of passes to newspa- 
pers and other periodicals in payment for advertis- 



rought "tit in the decision. 

In i ~—iii i _ transportation to the pub- 
Knockout Ushers licals the railroads limit 
for Passes the use of transportation to certain 

trains. "If it is taken at its cash val- 
ue." a-k> Judge Kohlsaat, "win should the trans- 
portation be limited, as specified in the contract? If 
the magazine i> paying $500 to the defendants, why 
does it accept transportation of both less and differ- 
ent value than it would accept if it bought its tickets 
with money? It seem- fair to conclude that either 
the advertising is of less than cash value or the ad- 
vertisers arc grosslj imposed upon by the railroad." 
This is a new viewpoint and one which doubtless 
has not hitherto appeared to publishers, who have 
been content to accept, in "payment" for advertis- 
ing, privileges smaller than they would receive if the 
cash equivalent of the value of their advertising 
space were tendered to the railroads for transporta- 
tion. 

* + + 

"NOT GOOD on limited trains" is the indorse- 
ment found on "special advertising tickets", or 
passes, issued by the railroad companies to tbe pub- 
lishers of newspapers and magazines. The publish- 
ers contend that the space devoted to the railroads' 
advertisements is the equivalent of cash. That it is 
not so regarded by the railroad companies is proven 
by the fact that these companies will not exchange 
transportation on so-called limited trains for adver- 
tising: and that this fact is the viewpoint occupied 
by publishers is evidenced in the fact that they ac- 
cept what the railroads offer instead' of insisting 
that a specified amount of advertising be classed as 
the exact equivalent of cash, which may be used to 
secure the same accommodations on 
Should be on railroad trains that cash secures. 
Cash Basis The proper basis upon which rail- 
road companies and publishers of 
advertising mediums should deal is one of cash. 
Publishers should receive cash for advertising a rail- 
road, and pay cash for tickets entitling them to 
transportation. If a transportation voucher will 
not buy of the railroad company what cash will buy, 
it follows that it is not regarded, by either the rail- 
road company or the publisher, as the exact equiva- 
lent of money. If there is to be an exact equality 
in the matter of transportation rates, as provided by 
the Hepburn law, publishers whose periodicals carry 
advertising may as well put themselves in training 
to observe that law as completely as must manufac- 
turers and dealers in commodities other than ad- 
vertising space. The United States Circuit Court 
has sounded the warning. 

* * + 

SOME OF THOSE who read with intense in- 
terest Mary Holland Kinkaid's recent novel, "The 
Man of Yesterday", may have thought that the au- 



Pacific Outlook 



thor had slightly overdrawn her picture of political 
intriguery incident to the long series of frauds which 
resulted in the theft of lands from the Indian in- 
habitants of Indian Territory. If there were such 
skeptics, the recently telegraphed news from Wash- 
ington to the effect that United States Senator 

Owen of Oklahoma is to be one of 
The Basis the respondents in a suit to be begun 
of a Novel in the courts of the new state next 

week, and that practically every man 
of prominence in Oklahoma is to be included in the 
litigation, should be convincing evidence of the fact 
that Mrs. Kinkaid's story was based upon actual 
conditions in the territory before the days of state- 
hood. Incidentally let us suggest to those who have 
not been fortunate enough to have had the pleas- 
ure of reading "The Man of Yesterday" that they 
do so. It is not only a fascinating romance, but it 
gives one a better idea of the customs and traditions 
of the "vanishing race" than, any other book we 
have read in many a day. 

* * * 

CHARLES M. SCHWAB, the steel magnate, in 
discussing the subject of subsidies for American 
ships, recently said: "The question of an American 
ship subsidy is one I regard as of great importance 
to this country. The policy of subsidies is being op- 
posed by many persons who apparently are not 
thoroughly familiar with the situation. If we should 
have a sufficient number of American bottoms, we 
could control the steel business of the world. As 
it is now, we are compelled to send our steel to 
South America by way of Southampton. In case 
of an emergency the United States would be com- 
pelled to purchase foreign ships. Oppo- 
Ship sition to the ship subsidy bill is due en- 

Subsidies tirely to a misconception of its true 
meaning." Many will accuse Mr. 
Schwab of being actuated by selfish motives in ad- 
vocating the passage of a ship subsidy bill. That 
is but natural, as the great institution of which he 
is the head is in the business of manufacturing a 
material which forms the most important parts of 
modern ships. But this in nowise alters the fact 
that American shipping is rapidly being reduced to 
immaterial proportions because of the masterly in- 
activity of Congress, which has failed to make pro- 
vision for its development. Subsidies may not be 
the best solution of the problem, but in the absence 
of any other remedy acceptable to the majority of 
Americans is not the subsidy plan worthy of a 
trial? 

* * * 

IS THERE nothing new under the sun? A cer- 
tain great Book declares that there is not, and hu- 
man experience and history teach the same thing. 
There is that modern invention, as we believe it to 
be, the taxicab, for instance. The taxicab, instead 



of being something new, is an institution that is 
covered with the dust of ages. It is now declared 
to be an ancient Chinese invention. A Far Eastern 
journal, "I'Ostasiatische Lloyd", proves by draw- 
ings taken from a famous collection, the "Tsan-thu- 

hae", that vehicles kindred to the 
The Taxicab taxicab existed in China eight hun- 
a Chestnut? dred years ago. The "giligulicha" 

was fitted with an instrument which 
struck a drum with the passage of every mile. 
Furthermore, this original Chinese taximeter was 
provided with a compass, a desirable adjunct when 
traveling through a country where routes are not 
indicated. Even in a section like Southern Califor- 
nia, where most of the roads are marked by sign- 
boards, a compass sometimes would come in handy. 
We wonder if the Chinese are quietly laughing at 
the American or British boast over the wonderful 
taxicab and taximeter. Perhaps somebody will dis- 
cover, next, that the Chinese or Japanese used auto- 
mobiles eight or ten hundred years ago. 

TAKE NOTICE, preachers of the Gospel : The 
Rev. Walter E. Tanner, pastor of a church at Mel- 
rose, a suburb of Oakland, has been unceremonious- 
ly ousted from his pastorate because of his activities 
in behalf of civic righteousness. Soon after being 
called to the church, last September, he became 
identified with the Good Government League of 
Melrose and waged war against the road bouses 
and other questionable resorts in that locality, from 
his pulpit and through the press. It is reliably re- 
ported that members of the Board of Supervisors 
had declared that he "must be gotten out of the 
country." To accomplish this the 
Warning to church meeting at which action was 
Preachers taken to oust him was "packed". 
There was no general knowledge 
that such a course was under consideration until 
the congregation had assembled. Think of the hor- 
rible nature of the charge against this young man ! 
He fought vice ! He sought the undoing of resorts 
where young girls were ruined ! He assailed an in- 
stitution which is known to be one of the most 
potential factors ira politics! Hence, at the behest 
of politicians enjoying the benefit of such support as 
this institution may give them, he was summarily 
"fired" from his pulpit ! What an awful warning 
to preachers who have been daring to antagonize 
this particular form of vice ! We submit the matter 
to the clergymen of Los Angeles who have been 
delivering sermons against the social evil and its 
protection by public officials. They'd better "watch 
out". 

* * * 
THE REPUBLICAN campaign managers are 
employing with telling effect the history of the poli- 
tical ambitions of both Mr. Bryan and his running 



Pacific Outlook 



mate, John VV. Kern. Both have been defeated a 

sufficient number of times to warrant the conclusion 
that neither will take his 

much to heart. It is a striking coincidence that Mr. 

• r lias he enjoyed ?) de- 
feat in his canvass for the presidency, and has been 
andidtcy for nomination at 
the hands of tin I democracy ; and that Mr. Kern has 

been defeated twice as a candidate for 
Synonym governor of Indiana, besides having 
for Defeat been defeated once in his contest for 

the United Suites senatorship. The 
term "defeat" appears to have become linked in- 
Separably with the names of both candidates. If 
there be any truth in the adage that "nothing suc- 
1s like success", is it not a logical inference that 
hing fails like failure" and that a series of de- 
feats is a gloomy augury of still another defeat? 
Following the example of the Republican conven- 
tion, the Democratic convention made its nomina- 
tion for the vice-presidency an appeal for the votes 
of a certain state, rather than an act based upon 
principle. But it was short-sighted in selecting a 
man whose very name, like that of Bryan, is a 
synonym for defeat. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 



None So Blind 
Herbert Spencer 
The man who, expending his energies wholly on 
private affairs, refuses to take trouble about public 
affairs, pluming himself on his wisdom in minding 
his own business, is blind to the fact that his own 
business is made possible only by maintenance of 
a healthy social state, and that he loses all around 
by defective governmental arrangements. Where 
there are man}' like-minded with himself — where, 
as a consequence, offices come to be filled by poli- 
tical adventurers and opinion is 'swayed by dema- 
gogues — where bribery vitiates the administration 
of law and makes fraudulent State transactions 
habitual, heavy penalties fall on the community at 
large, and among others, on those who have thus 
done everything for self and nothing for society. 
Their investments are insecure ; recovery of their 
debts is difficult, and even their lives are less safe 
than thev would otherwise have been. 



Patriotism of Peace 
Grover Cleveland 
It would by no means be entirely out of keeping 
with the occasion to extol the courage of battle- 
fields, where patriotism expects the giving of hu- 
man lives for country's sake. But this physical 
courage is so much a part of our national character 



that its recognition i- universal and its stimulation 
IT co, rj 's needs. 

What our nation needs, and sorely needs, is more 
of the patriotism that is born of moral courage — 
the courage that at tscs and Struggles lot- 

civic reforms single-handed, without counting 
posing numbers or measuring opposing forces. 

Political organization will always bi >r in 

the equipment and conduct of our government, and 
a- long as parties exisl there will be part- 
But every thoughtful man who loves his country 
it to realize in this time of political awakening 
that the public welfare demands that parties should 
■ and mis nething better than 

mere machines to serve selfishness and the ends of 
low and perverted partisanship: nor should any fail 
to detect the humiliation and disgrace that attaches 
to those who follow party leadership and become 
a thing of proprietary control, prostituted to the use 
of base bargaining and treacherous schemes. No 
one can know so little of the partisan human na- 
ture as to suppose that an honest voter thus threat- 
ened with betrayal or disgrace in his party relation- 
ship can save his honor and political integrity by 
any less radical remedy than loud protest or open 
desertion. 



Dead Letter Laws 
Prof. Graham Taylor, Chicago 
The will of the people in a democracy, if enacted 
by legislature, is the law of the land. It is an un- 
tenable position) to attempt to enforce the will of a 
minority, even for the preservation of the Sabbath, 
upon the majorities. It is just such attempts that 
lead to the popular disrespect for law. Enforce- 
ment of such laws can not long be maintained, how- 
ever spasmodically effective they may prove to be. 
If, as many assert, any law can be enforced, the 
fact remains that laws enacted or enforced by a 
minority against the will of a majority sooner or 
later become dead letters. And nothing is more 
demoralizing than "a dead letter law." 



The City's Function 

Governor Charles E. Hughes 
Every city should be a school of statesmanship. 
There should be taught the rules of civic 'honor and 
of devotion to the public weal. There should be 
found the sacrifices of patriotism in times of peace. 
There should be the training for the wider respon- 
sibilities of state and nation. And there should be 
developed that sense of the dignity and worth of 
citizenship which .will bring to naught the devices 
of those who twist our republican forms of govern- 
ment to suit their petty despotisms and who seek 
to control for purposes of tribute the highways of 
our political life. 



Responsibility 
Gov. Guild of Massachusetts 
The greater the education of the criminal, the 
greater his guilt. Yet some of the most educated 
people in the community seem to believe that the 
Governor should be committed to every kind of 
pressure for some of the worst scoundrels that ever 
lived. All the evil does not come from the unedu- 
cated classes. We need a little more patriotism 
among our educated classes. It is doubly the duty 
of the educated man to perform all the everyday 
duties of the citizen. 



Pacific Outlook 







By Colonel J. J. STEADMAN 

For years editor of the California Cultivator 

(At the request of the Pacific Outlook Colonel J. J. Stead-man of Hollywood, for years editor of the 
California Cultivator and one of the most eminent authorities on road constiuction in California, if not 
indeed in the United States, has prepare.d the following article on this all-absorbing topic. Colonel Stead- 
man's generally-recognized familiarity with the subject lends great weight to anything he may have to say 
regarding road building. — The Editor.) 





siwaT is a matter for universal congratulation 
Hie t ' iat P UDUC sentiment in this locality has at 
' last been aroused to the necessity for im- 
proved conditions in our highways. So long 
have the people of California shown indif- 
ference to the advantages which accrue from a well- 
ordered system of roads ; so long have the oppor- 
tunities to create as fine roadways as any country 
in the world can boast of remained ungrasped that 
it has become the subject of constant remark among 
tourists and visitors, both in this country and 
Europe, why this apathy exists. 

. Good roads builders in the United States and in 
foreign countries who have examined the character 
of our California soils are united in the belief that 
nowhere do the same conditions obtain, to a greater 
extent, for complete and durable systems of public 
thoroughfores, than in this state; and the wonder of 
them all is why this important adjunct to our in- 
dustrial advancement has so long been neglected. 
!• use the term "industrial advancement" in its gen- 
eric sense, for experience teaches us that without 
improved highways every commercial interest in a 
state suffers serious and lasting injury. Good roads 
have a money value direct and pronounced, and the 
difference between them is often equivalent to the 
difference between profit and loss. Leaving out the 
question of convenience, comfort, pleasure and the 
moral and social benefits which good roads always 
enhance, and looking at them from a purely mone- 
tary viewpoint they are found to return handsome 
dividends on the outlay for their construction and 
maintenance. 

It has been the observation of all who have given 
che subject any consideration that good roads are a 
distinct asset in property because they attract en- 
terprising people to them and become the basis of 
expensive homes. They are as much a farm asset 
as the land through which they pass, because they 
economize time in transportation of products, save 
wear and tear of horses and vehicles, increase the 
market value of real estate and the value of the 
products transported to market. The Department 
of Agriculture at Washington has for years been 
engaged in an effort to educate the people to the 
intrinsic importance of constructing and maintain- 
ing good roads. It has been shown that a greater 
per cent of gain attains on money judiciously ex- 
pended in creating and supporting improved high- 
ways, not only in the rural districts, which are 
thereby brought more to the farmer's base of sup- 
plies and his market, but in the cities and towns 



where people congregate to carry on business and 
to enjoy the comforts and pleasures attendant upon 
a community of interests. 

Readers of the Pacific Outlook who have traveled 
over the well kept roads of many of the Eastern 
States readily note the difference between their 
construction, and the want of construction so glar- 
ingly manifest in the roads of this country. It will 
be noted that in Massachusetts, where the soil bears 
a close similarity to that of many sections of Cali- 
fornia, the highways resemble a well ballasted track 
bed of a railroad. They are builded on civil en- 
gineering principles, the base being constructed of 
one substance, possibly, and the crown, of another. 
Attention is given to the grade of the country 
through which the road is constructed and the ma- 
terial used conforms to the character of said grade. 

In an article written last year and published in an 
agricultural magazine in Los Angeles, J. W. Abott, 
a recognized authority on road building, stated that 
''California possesses every variety of soil necessary 
to build and maintain, at moderate expense, a sys- 
tem of highways unequaled by any other state in the 
Union." My own study and observation, extending 
over a period of more than fifteen, years, in different 
states of the Union, lead me unhesitatingly to sup- 
port this declaration of Mr. Abott. We have here 
the decomposed granite, which is the best covering 
for an adobe soil, and the red clay which becomes 
as hard as the granite, when properly worked and 
cared for ; we have or can obtain crushed rock, 
which may be used in conjunction' with ninety per 
cent asphaltic oil, and when placed on a body of 
gravel of sufficient thickness makes a wonderfully 
fine surface of enduring quality and comparatively 
dustless. 

Experience and practice have given us certain 
advantages which ought to benefit us in California 
in constructing our highways. We have learned 
that soils and clay, sand, gravel and decomposed 
rock, when properly concreted, are transformed into 
elegant roads, streets and boulevards, by methods 
which conform to their variey of character and 
to Nature's laws. 

There are certain well-defined principles to be ap- 
plied to road building which, if intelligently ob- 
served and followed, will make them enduring and 
not necessarily over expensive, in this ideal climate, 
for lasting service. They should be laid out at 
first in obedience to the topography of the country, 
they should be constructed of such material as will 
make them enduring, they should be hard, smooth, 



Pacific Outlook 



hat water in. I-. 

suit- 

- for rural 

haltum in the mak- 

led in this country as prac- 

I'.ut when the repairs attendant upon as- 

phaltum or oiled streets are taken into account it 

tion if. in a -erii~ of years, they are no! the 

iper. The) are ca fifty per cent more 

r anil. w ! blished, are easily and 

iply maintained. In the countries of the old 

world they are quite generally adopted, and in the 

New England - pular as well. 

deplorable conditions which obtain in so 
many counties in this state, in regard to our public 
roads Oned b\ the material used in their 

construction, hut the frightful lack of common, ordi- 
nary, horse sense in the makers of them. From 
boards of supervisor- down to overseers there is 
manifested a shocking display of ignorance of the 
first principles of road building. If it is not ignor- 
ance, it is graft. < Mir so-called > il roads, as a general 
prop re simpj) abominable abortions, mis- 

erably constructed (we had better said miserably 
neglected), covered with a thin coating of fifty per 
cent crude oil which vanishes under the hot sun as 
the dreams of the rainbow chaser arc dispelled by 
the fatality of events. Out of approximately 50.000 
miles of made roads in California, today, not 5.000 
miles of them can be called, in any sense, more than 
-able. The balance are an abomination and a 
disgrace to the authorities of the counties wherein 
they exist. Twenty-five hundred miles have been 
oiled, but later neglected, and are really in worse 
condition than before any improvement was at- 
tempted. 

Who is to blame for this condition of affairs? In 
the first instance the people who permit it. Men 
are made supervisors without the least qualification 
to fill the office, either as it relates to moral at- 
tributes or to knowledge of the varied responsibili- 
ties which it carries. Lacking in both qualities their 
appointees are likewise "time servers" : their work 
is money wasted to the tax payers and the whole 
country suffers by their dishonesty and incompe- 
tency. 

Is it any wonder the people ask the question, now 
that the bonds for good roads are up for endorse- 
ment: "Do you think we can possibly get an equiva- 
lent for this vast outlay?" Their incredulity is not 
to be wondered at. The only amazing feature about 
the proposition is that it should be received with 
the credence it appears to have at this time. 

We want the bonds to carry. We want good 
roads in Los Angeles county. But we want men of 
honesty and integrity to be the builders of them. 
We can obtain the requisite knowledge as to their 
construction from the Department of Agriculture at 
Washington, if we have it not among us, but we 
must have sterling honesty all along the line to ob- 
tain an equivalent for the expenditure of $3,500,000. 
A satisfactory beginning seems to have been made 
in the formation of the Good Roads Commission for 
Los Angeles county. The test will come when a 
reorganized Board of Supervisors shall later have 
the supervision of this all important matter partly 
in their control. 

To collate the advantages which good roads will 
insure, let me quote a paragraph from a speech 



made in the Senati United State- April 24, 

by the Hon. Jol 11. Bankhead of Alabama. 
1 le said : 

I roads are --. the best 

proof of intelligent are the initial sourci 

commerce, which swell in great Streams and How 

everywhere, distributing the product- of our fields, 

forests, and factor;. highways are the com- 

mon propertj of th( country, their benefits are 

needed by all, and as they 
benefit all, all should c> mtribute to them." 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 
Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

Co ii you imagine tlic future of Los Angeles? It 
is today 300.000 nearer a city of a million popula- 
tion than it was 23 years ago. There is no question 
of its continuous growth. If you do have the power 
of imagination to look into the future you should 
own Business Properly. Read this: 

"Twenty-five years ago today the school board of 
Los Angeles city, having sold' the old Spring Street 
school lot on the corner of Spring and Second 
Streets (the present site of the Bryson Building). 
purchased a lot with 120 feet fronting on Spring 
Street and an equal one on Broadway (then Fort 
Street) for $12,500. Mercantile Place now runs 
through the property. The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages. The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is 100 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial. Los Angeles Times, June 1, 1908. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
'business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. . 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



10 



Pacific Outlook 




o-~ 



A Newcomer from Hoosierdom Has His Eyes Open 

(The Pacific Outlook has received from a correspondent who has omitted to append his name some 
interesting comments on things which have impressed him during the brief period of his residence in this 
city. Anonymous communications, as a rule, go into the waste basket; but we are prompted to break the 
rule in this instance, believing that our unknown contributor is on the verge of giving expression to views 
on some of the institutions — perhaps some of the men — of Los Angeles that are worthy of consideration. 
As his full name and address do not appear on the manuscript containing his first offering we take this 
opportunity, the only one presenting itself, to invite him to continue the work he has begun. — The Editor.) 




jAY back last summer, about a year ago, I 
picked up my morning paper — the Wabash 
Sycamore — and read a telegraph dispatch 
from Los Angeles stating that this wonder- 
ful city had just decided, by an overwhelm- 
ing vote, to issue twenty-three million dollars in 
bonds for the construction of the biggest water sys- 
tem in the United States, with one possible excep- 
tion. For nearly forty years I have been living on 
the banks of the Wabash. If you have ever made 
that part of the country your home, of if you have 
ever spent any time at all there, you will know that 
the lack of good pure drinking water at all seasons 
of the year is one of the subjects which occasion 
considerable discussion among those people wbo 
dare to "speak out in meeting", regardless of what 
their fellow citizens may think. Well, I "spoke out" 
rather too freely to suit" most of my neighbors, who 
called me unpatriotic, disloyal, a carping critic, a 
stubborn kicker and a lot of other things of this 
sort. The upshot was that, after thinking hard and 
long about it, I came to the conclusion that there 
were so many undesirable things about that par- 
ticular bit of country that, although it had been 
my home since early childhood, I would nose around 
and see if I could not find a place where my children 
might be reared to maturity with a fair prospect 
that they would not succumb to malaria, to tuber- 
culosis,, to sunstroke, to cyclones or some other dis- 
tressful affliction. So with this copy of the Syca- 
more in my hands, I entered the house and told my 
wife I believed that at last I had discovered the lo- 
cation of the one spot in America where we all 
might go and spend the rest of our days in peace, 
in comfort and in happiness. 

As you may well imagine, especially if you, too, 
were compelled to sever old home ties in order to 
satisfy a desire similar to that which had been gnaw- 
ing at my heart, it took something of a wrench to 
get my family and myself broken loose ; but, to cut 
a long story short, we managed to say farewell — 
and I hope forever — to that region of country made 
famous by a popular song in vogue about ten years 
ago. 

We arrived in Los Angeles — the ignorant con- 
ductor told us it was Loss Angeleese — on the thir- 
teenth of May. So you see I have been here long 
enough to have formed 1 a variety of opinions. It is 
these opinions, and views, and suggestions, that I 
want to get rid of. I have found my system clogged 
with thoughts that I must express — hence this let- 
ter to you. I tried three of the daily papers, but 
none of them seemed willing to print what I offered 
(perhaps my literary "style" is too crude to suit 
their tastes), but something within me prompts me 
to believe that a paper as "independent, truthful and 



fearless" as the Pacific Outlook is will not stop at 
such a trifle, provided there is food for reflection in 
that which is offered. I trust that I have made my- 
self clear, in spite of my poor rhetoric. If you are 
willing to give space to this contribution — well, 1 
can assure you that I am a persistent fellow and for 
the present shall have little to do but to keep poking 
my nose into things in Los Angeles that interest me 
and may interest others. 

As might naturally have been expected, the first 
thing I did after I had been toted around the city 
by the surface cars was to branch out into the sub- 
urbs. I presume you know it already, but I want 
to say, to be sure you understand it, that back in 
my part of the country every traveler who returns 
from California tells his neighbor all about the won- 
derful street car system of Los Angeles — by street 
cars meaning, I suppose, the city lines and those de- 
voted to suburban traffic. The result was that be- 
fore I left Indiana I had been pretty well filled up 
with talk about the magnificent passenger transpor- 
tation facilities offered by Los Angeles.- What trick 
of Fate do you suppose ever led me to start on my 
first tour of investigation suburbanward on the Los 
Angeles-Pacific, the only poorly equipped line run- 
ning out of the city? One day about the middle of 
June I bought a ticket for Venice and Santa Monica 
and started by way of Hollywood. Biff — bang — 
whish — jerk — rattle ! Surely, thought I; I have 
started out right at the beginning of an earthquake. 

"What's the matter?" I inquired of a fellow-pas- 
senger. 

"Matter with what?" was the counter query. 

"Why, the matter with these cars, of course," I 
returned. "Don't you notice how they slam and 
jerk and twist?" 

"Oh, you'll get used to that after a bit," was the 
quieting assurance. "Must be a stranger," he con- 
tinued in a half-questioning tone. 

We were jolted and joggled and bumped and 
jerked for an hour or so, and when I emerged from 
the car, at Santa Monica, I had an appetite like a 
Chicago river dredge at work. * * * (The re* 
mainder of our contributor's remarks on this par- 
ticular topic are unprintable, so we will omit them. 
We try to publish a paper that dares enter any home 
without hanging its head in shame.) On my way 
home, over the "short line," the conductor informed 
me that with the completion of the Hill street tun- 
nel all basis for complaint as to this shortcoming of 
the road would disappear as thin air, as at that time 
the entire system would be on standard gauge. The 
hundreds of people who are compelled to patronize 
this road will not suffer from the physical and men- 
tal disquietude born of daily shake-ups and- justifi- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



able resentment when the auspicious day marking 
the >{ tlic tunnel a stablishment of 

a mi irrived, 1 hope. 

What a revelation — speaking of electric railroads 
— in a trip on almost any one of the Huntir 
lines, so-called. After my lirst trip, to I.. 

comprehend win i; was that tin 
electric car system was so famous. I 

haven't seen the rid, not by several jug- 

'. hut if any ether city can offer anything 
in the line of suburban transportation facilities for 
rs that approaches that extended by the 
Huntington system nobody has ever told me any- 
j about it. 
It was only a couple of weeks ago, if my memory 
is not at fault, when 1 read in the Pacific Outlook 
thing about the necessity of a "crosstown" line 
in the western part of the city — a line running 
north and smith, somewhere in the vicinity of and 
parallel with Vermont avenue. You hit the nail on 
the head. 1 live within three blocks of Vermont 
avenue, in the southwestern part of the city, and I 
have not been slow to see the great lack in this di- 
rection. Why can't you manage to get the rest of 
the papers — the big dailies — interested in the move- 
ment? Or are they so small that they will not take 
hold .if a proposition like this just because a weekly 
publication has thought of it first ? Keep after them ; 
"try it out". I believe they will "come through" in 
time. Goodness knows the southwest people need 
what you have proposed. 

While I am writing about street cars I am re- 
minded of roads of the more time-honored variety — 
the common public highways. I hadn't been here 
more than a week or so before one of my neighbors, 
a man engaged in the real estate business, told me 
that there was afoot in Los Angeles county a pro- 
ject for the expenditure of over three million dol- 
lars for the construction of a fine system of rural 
roads. He declared that "everybody wanted good 
roads", which was gratifying intelligence, to be 
sure; but that a lot of people were afraid that if the 
present board of county commissioners (our con- 
tributor evidently refers to our Board of Supervis- 
ors) were to have a chance to get their fingers upon 
any portion of this big fund 1 the people would not 
"stand for any such graft as that". 

Since then I have learned that the law passed by 
your legislature confers upon the Highway Com- 
mission the power to say how and where the money 
shall be expended. If this is so, why on earth should 
anybody oppose the bonds? It makes me think of 
the narrow-minded folks I left back "on the banks 
of the Wabash" to pick up my paper and read that 
the citizens of such and such a district of some ward 
will oppose the bond issue just because, forsooth, 
the highway authorities have not planned to run a 
sixteen-foot boulevard right in front of their prem- 
ises. 

How on earth can any man with half a brain brin^ 
himself to oppose such a beneficent project as this 
for any such puerile reasons ? Never, in my humble 
opinion, was a man so oblivious to his own best in- 
terests as he who, residing in the second or third 
or eighth or any other ward in the city, objects to 
the expenditure of money for the improvement of 
the main, highways, the trunk lines of commerce be- 
tween Los Angeles and the adjacent territory. 

I wonder if these "kickers" fully realize what they 
are trying to do — what the success of their attack 



^ 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We can put \ on up a I ome in aim i art of 

the i : -ins to the Westlake Dis- 

trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and ith us, 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Hatvcy McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 
I 
D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



b 

u 

s 

N 

E 
S 
S 



PROPERTIES 



IHnberbill Sbirt Go. 



MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SHirts 



Phone F 6715 414K South Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streeis. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co.. Santa Ana. Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 

ROBERT rIADISON, Sol* Agent for Los Angela County 

Phone P 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle 


{Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loans, 


Investments, 










Insurance 






GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 
Real Estate 




Phone F 1468 






902 Security Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



upon the present movement means. I doubt if they 
do. I don't know every foot of Los Angeles county, 
by any means ; but since my arrival I have seen 
enough of the surrounding country, have learned 
enough about its resources and the possibility of 
developing them — of practically bringing the whole 
county right to the gates of the city — to compre- 
hend one thing; which is this: that the very men 
who are now making the foolish fight against the 
bond proposition because no work is to be done in 
certain districts where the needs are not so great as 
the)' happen to be in others are, to use a homely 
expression, "biting the noses off their own faces". I 
have lived just long enough to learn that what bene- 
fits a whole community benefits every mother's son 
forming a part of such community. If the improved 
highway system is to benefit Los Angeles county, 
it will not only be of direct benefit to these short- 
sighted "kickers", but it will benefit the counties 
contiguous to Los Angeles county. as well. 

But it is a waste of time to try to argue with some 
people, and from all I can learn the fellows who are 
raising such a rumpus about the proposed bond is- 
sue are too thick-headed to be worth arguing with. 
I really didn't think I would run across any consid- 
erable number of specimens of this sort of mankind 
in Los Angeles, of all places in America. The town 
has a different reputation. 

When I started to write I thought I would say 
something about the action of the City Council on 
the subject of charter revision, and about the fight 
a bumptious young man,, a Mr. Woolwine, is mak- 
ing against the men who are doing everything they 
can to give Los Angeles a reputation of being an 
"off color" town. But I am afraid if I run along a-ny 
further this time my contribution will find a resting 
place in that bourne from which some manuscripts 
never return. If what I have said this time finds 
favor in your eyes, I shall try again next week, I 
am full of things, as I said before, that I must get 
out of my system if I am to be happy. I want to 
give you my impressions and, through the columns 
of your paper — which, by the way, is living up to its 
motto — ask a few nertinent questions of the people 
of Los Anareles. Therefore I hope I have not worn 
out my welcome. STIMULUS. 

* * * 

Grandmother's Destination in Dovabt 

Ethel is of the mature age of five. Recently her 
RTandmother concluded that it devolved on her to 
instruct the child in religious matters. 

"You must be a good girl, Ethel," she said. 
"Then you will go to heaven when you die." 

Ethel seemed scarcely pleased with this reward 
for exceptional conduct. 

"Don't you want to go to heaven?" asked grand- 
ma with a look of reproach. 

"Oh, I don't know," temporized Ethel, "I guess 
not." 

"Why not?" demanded grandma severely. 

"Because maybe I couldn't get out," answered 
Ethel. 

"You wouldn't want to get out." replied grandma. 

"Oh, yes I should," returned Ethel with convic- 
tion. 

"No," argued grandma, "you would not. Why 
should you want to ?et out of heaven?" 

"Why," answered Ethel, "I guess I'd want to go 
and see vou once in awhile, wouldn't I?"— Woman's 
Home Companion. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M-. NATHAN SON 

LADIES - TAILOR 
HABIT MAHER 

... Highest Class Xailoring at Moderate Prices... 
216 Mercantile Place 




We 

Pay 
Special 
Attention 

To 

Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 




women i >' l os Vngeles been 

nlcil a happier opportunity to lion luir 

number than ■ if the election of Mrs, Josiah 

esidency of the < ieneral 

Women's Clubs. A) the Ebell club- 

-. afternoon hundreds paid tributi 

m thus recently honored. The reception 

fell little - 3 an ovation. Among those 

with Mrs. ( lowles wen- 
Mr-. Florence Collins Porter, president of the I o 
Mr-. \\ illiam Baurhyte, Mrs. 
Bryant and Mrs. Willoughby Rodman, 
presented the visitors, and Mines. Severance, 
hurst, Hole. Prior, 'Taylor and Wallace, who 
assisted in receiving. \ -rye Rice. Mathew 

Robertson, X. S. Lobinger and W. L, Jones pre- 
sided at the tea table; while six young girls, in 
dainty gowns, served tea. These were Helen Bry- 
ant, Alice Cline, Helen Thresher, Edvthe Bryant, 
Alice Jones and Frances Richards. The Venetian 
Orchestra, composed of young girls, rendered ex- 
quisite music. After the reception, Airs. Cowles 
made a short address in the auditorium. The Re- 
ception Committee of the afternoon was composed 
of Mmes. T. G. Hubert. X. K. T'ottcr, R. J. Waters, 
C. E. Slosson, Fred H. Jones. A. T. Stewart and C. 
E. Nichols. 

A marriage of interest to many friends in this 
city and the East is that of Miss Elaine J. Johnson, 
daughter of 'Sir. and Mrs. Charles Johnson of St. 
Paul. Minn., to A. F!. McAllister, a well known 
young- business man of this city. The ceremony 
took place Tuesday evening in St. John's Epis- 
copal church. After Aug-. 1 the couple will be at 
home at the Doria apartments, West Tico street. 

Miss Julia Ann Weadick, a popular young lady 
of Sacramento, and Patrick J. Burke, an attache of 
the Southern Pacific Company in this city, were 
married last week in St. Francis Roman Catholic 
church in Sacramento. An elaborate musical ser- 
vice was rendered as a part of the ceremony. After 
a tour of British Columbia Mr. and Mrs. Burke will 
reside in Los Angeles. 

Judge and Airs. J. D. Bicknell. accompanied by 
their granddaughter. Miss Ella Gates, have gone 
to Bremerton, Wash., to visit their son-in-law and 
daughter. Sergeant and Mrs. Charles P. Bagg. 
Eater they will go to Seattle, Victoria, B. C, and 
other places of interest. 

The marriage of Miss Helen M. Gray and James 
C. Olsen was solemnized Sunday evening by the 
Rev. Will A. Knighten at the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo F. Gray, of No. 116 
West Seventeenth street. 

Mrs. Ora Hardin Scott entertained Monday at a 
luncheon of ten covers given as a farewell compli- 
ment to Mrs. Frances Thoroughman, who will 
leave Aug. 1 for an extended stay in San Francisco, 
and for Madame Genevra Johnstone-Bishop, who 
will leave soon for a visit with relatives in- New 



York, to be followed b> .i tour of the world. Be- 
sides the hostess and h< r guests of 
present were Mrs. R. G. Schroeter, Mrs. E. W, at 
gent, Mrs. Phillip Gerhardy, Mrs, Lillian Worth 
Fruhling, Mrs. Dwight Hart and Mr-. ]ohn Fred- 
erick Kanst, 

Mrs. Guy II. Hamilton of Berkelej is visiting 
in the southern part of the slate and was the spei 
ial guest at a prettily appointed luncheon recently 

at which her hostess, Mrs. R, II. Mock of Long 
Beach, entertained. Mrs. M. H. Keith of Eos An- 
geles shared the honors of the pretty compliment.. 

The wedding of Alls- (ora Harper and Calvin T. 
Gibson was solemnized Tuesday evening at the 
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
A. Harper, No. 3105 Kenwood street, the Rev. Dr. 
George F, Bovard officiating-. The young couple 
will reside in this city. 

Mrs. William E. Ruess of Los Angeles has been 
the guest of her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and 
Mrs. Christopher Ruess. at their home in Oakland, 
en route East. She will tour the Eastern states for 
several months. 

Mrs. Atkinson of Lamanda Park entertained 
Prof, and Mrs. Burton at a garden party Wednes- 



< 



\s&®£*4ht 




#: 



So.Bhoadway ^'i^'-'S^f^S^y^ So. Hi li* Street 
A. FUSENOT CO. 



Women's 
Bathing Suits 

We have unusually good values in Bath- 
ing Suits at $2.00, $2.25, $2.50,. $3-°cr, $5-o°, up 
to $10.00. They are in All Wool Mohairs — 
three-piece Suits, with bloomers attached. 
Colors are black, blue, gray and brown. 
Suits have Sailor Collars, with yokes and 
braid trimmings in contrasting colors. 

Silk Bathing Caps and Shoes to match, 
in fancy plaids, $3.50 a set. 

Bathing Caps, all colors, 35c upwards. 

Bathing Shoes, both black and white, 50c 
up. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



day from three o'clock until twilight. Prof. Burton 
has recently finished a. course of lectures on the 
drama at Cumnock Hall, and having expressed his 
admiration for the beauty of our country homes he 
was given this occasion to enjoy the charms of the 
San Gabriel valley. 

In honor of Miss Dottie Bee Latham of San Jose, 
who with her grandmother, Mrs. F. E. Crowell, is a 
guest at the home of Mr. and 1 Mrs. M. P. Snyder, 
Mrs. John W. Mitchell entertained with an informal 
garden tea at her home, Vermont avenue and First- 
street, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Paul Chandler of St. An- 
drews' place have announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Miss Lucille Chandler, and Ray- 
mond Stephens, son of Judge and Mrs. Albert M. 
Stephens. The wedding will take place in the early 
fall. 

. Mrs. Ellen I. Lacy of No. 928 West Twentieth 
street was complimented guest at a luncheon with 
which Mrs. Henry Warren Fitch ofNo. 2812 Har- 
vard boulevard entertained at the Copper Kettle 
Tuesday in celebration of her birthday anniversary. 

Miss Levielle, who has been giving sketches from 
the French translated by herself, has returned to 
San Francisco, where she will continue to give her 
dainty entertainments in private houses. • 

Miss Grace E. Brinkop, a pretty girl of Los An- 
geles, was niarried in Oakland July 14 to Thorne 
E. Free of that' city. Mrs. Free is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Brinkop of this city. 

Mrs. Mark Lewis of Birmingham, Ala., will be 
complimented guest at a reception with which her 
mother, Mrs. R. H. Howell of No. 1122 West 
Seventh street, will entertain July 28. 

Miss Eva Elizabeth Keating, who has been east 
since May, is the guest of Mrs. Harry Logan of 
Toronto, Ont. She will not return to Los Angeles 
until October. 

Mrs. Austin S. Cadwallader entertained Wednes- 
day at her new home, No. 348 West Forty-eighth 
street, with a musicale in compliment 'to Mrs. Wil- 
liam E. Bush. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Laughlin and daughter, 
Miss Guendolen, and Mrs. Laughlin's sister, Miss S. 
Battenburg, have returned from a tour of Alaska. 

Mrs. D. K. Trask, who went east early in March 
as a delegate to the National Congress of Mothers, 
held in Washington,, D. C, has returned. 

Mr. and Mrs\ J. H. Braly will sail August 10 for 
a teni months' tour of the world, going first to Japan 
and India and home through Europe. 

Mrs. Minnie Sutter of No. 1050 South Burling- 
ton avenue has as her guest for the summer her 
niece, Miss Mary Sutter of St. Louis. 

Mrs. William Squire, Miss Winstanley and Miss 
Mary Squire of Hollywood will spend August at 
Balboa beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Orcutt will leave August 
1 for a month's outing in the mountains near Ven- 
tura. 

Miss Margaret Goetz gave a delightful musicale 
at her home Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. William de Fremery of Oakland is the guest 
of friends in this city. 




Plan to Visit 



Yosemite 
Valley 



This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, ob 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 



Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Pine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and A'arnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample hooks to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 

Phone F 5141 Tenth and Main Sts. 



In Buying Furniture Here 

— you will be impressed with two things — the un- 
usual excellence of our stock in its entirety, and 
the strikingly moderate prices prevailing' in all 
departments. 

Ipa Angeles furniture Co. 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH and SEVENTH STREETS 

Furniture, Carpets. Rud^, Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character- 



FOR SALE 



A No. 7 Blickensderfer Typewriter, 
in fine condition, almost new. Cost 
$50.00. :: :: :: 

$J5 Cash Gets It 

Call at Pacific Outlook Office 



Pacific Outlook 



15 




"Candida" at Venice 

The last night of the Chautauqua assembly at 
Venice was devoted to the drama. Candida, the 
well known play by Bernard Shaw, was given by a 
company composed partly of amateurs and partly of 

professional actors. The part of the poet was taken 
by Percival Aylmer, who infused much tire and 
iment into the role. His representation of the 
is the host which we have seen. His little man- 
nerisms add greatly to the charm of his interpreta- 
tion. The part of Candida was tilled by Miss Cora 
Foy, who acquitted herself very creditably, particu- 
larly in Hie las: scene, where she has to choose be- 
tween Hie two men. The father of Candida was 
well uone if somewhat exaggerated. This is a play 
ful 1 of poetry, but it seems to have the exasperating 




Miss Mav Robson 
In "The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary". 

quality of making some members of the audience 
always laugh in the wrong place. Some enlightened 
souls seem to think that the poet is a buffoon, 
escaped from the vaudeville stage, and comfortably 
titter at his pain. This must be very trying for the 
actor who plays .the part. 



"The Lady from Laramie" 

"The Lady from Laramie", presented by the 
Morosco Stock Company, is a somewhat comical 
but very light farce. This play does not seem to 
attract the theatergoers, for the house was not the 
fullest on Monday night. It has been presented in 



Los Angeles several times and thai may be the cause 

of the lack of interest. 

William Desmond as "Archie Winthrop", a civil 
engineer, renders his pari very well. Blanche Hall 
as "Robin Weatherford", an American girl from 
the West, does a Strong piece of work and is a 
great help to the weaker members of the cast. H. 
J. Ginn as "Sir Blakesle} Beresford", a nobleman, 
is exceedingly clever. His acting is out of the ordi- 
nary. 

The "Lady from Laramie" nevertheless is amus- 
ing, and we can recommend it to the playgoer as 
worth seeing. 

D. O. N. 



"The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary" 

At the Mason Opera House Monday night, July 
27, May Robson will open a week's engagement in 
her great success, "The Rejuvenation of Aunt 
Mary". Whoever sees this rollicking comedy and 
does not enjoy it must indeed be lacking in risibility, 
for it is full of merriment of a good wholesome 
sort. And action — well — there is nothing sedate in 
the three laughing acts, and certainly not a single 
sedate character. 

Aunt Mary is the central figure, and in the hands 
of the clever May Robson the picture of the un- 
sophisticated spinster is complete. The shrill un- 
trained voice of the country woman, which softens 
and becomes musical when she speaks of things 
nearest to her heart; her nephew Jack, and his well- 
being; the snappy tongue and the close-pressed 
lips; the sharp angular movements of the woman 
who knows nothing of Delsarte, are only a few of 
the lifelike traits brought out by the star in her 
clever portraiture.- To see Aunt Mary is to love 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 



The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zhe Starr piano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



her, so sweetly and wholesomely is the character 
shown by Miss Robson." You wil-1 laugh with her 
and you will cry with her, and in the end you will go 
away wishing- you were lucky enough to have such 
an Aunt Mary of your own. 



Engages Tencr by Phonograph 

Paul Bleydeni, an American-born tenor, whose 
professional career has been spent in Europe, has 
replaced William C. Weedon in the role of Camille 
de Jolidon, with "The Merry Widow," at the Aerial 
Gardens, atop the New Amsterdam Theater in New 
York. 

Henry W. Savage engaged Mr. Bleyden by phono- 
graph. The tenor, who was born in Philadelphia 
and received his musical education im Vienna, has 
been anxious for the past year to sing in his native 
land. With this object in view he communicated 
with Mr. Savage during the latter's recent trip 
abroad and an appointment was made for the man- 
ager to hear the singer at the Stadt Theater, Berne, 
Switzerland, where Mr. Bleyden has been appear- 
ing in the leading tenor roles for the past two years. 

Owing' to a sudden change in his route, which 
entailed his departure for America at an earlier 
date than he had anticipated, Mr. Savage could not 
keep the Berne appointment and so notified Mr. 
Bleyden with regrets. The American impresario 
heard nothing" more of the matter until his arrival 
at his New York office, where, to his surprise, he 
found awaiting him an express package containing 
a phonographic record of the famous .tenor solo 
"Salve Dimora," from "Faust." Accompanying 
the package was an affidavit signed by Mr. Bleyden 
and stating that he had made the record. 

Mr. Savage sent for a phonograph, had the record 
affixed and placed on the stage of the Golden 
Theater. Seated in the balcony of the playhouse 
with the director of his music department he heard 
, the record, and was so thoroughly pleased with Mr. 
Bleyden's voice that, he engaged him by cable on 
the following day. 



Stage Superstitions 

"A stock actor is apt to have a prejudice against 
decorating or fixing up his dressing room," says a 
contributor to the Chicago Tribune. "He is certain 
to get his notice shortly after he" puts his pictures 
on the wall and otherwise makes the place comfort- 
able and homelike. Actors and managers both have 
a horror of the witch lines in 'Macbeth,' and they 
never will allo.w them to be spoken, as it means a 
fire in the playhouse before the twelvemonth is over. 
Sir Henry Irving was a firm believer in this super- 
stition, and he would never allow the fatal lines to 
be read when he was playing the tragedy. I know 
many players who fear to have anyone pass them 
on a stairway. There are many actors who make 
the sign of the cross before they make an entrance." 



Cruel 

"Is it becoming to me?" she asked, as, in the cos- 
tume of a hundred years ago, she paraded before 
her lord and master. 

"Yes, my dear," he meekly replied. 

"Don't you wish I could dress that way all the 
time?" 

"No, my dear; but I wish you had lived when 
that was the stvle." 




Is a California product — made especially for the 
housewift. It's a cleanser for the home and is 
adapted to use on 

Iron 

Steel 

Brass 

Copper 

Windows 

Woodwork 

and Porcelain Ware 

USE-IT 

TiTe AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



7 HE 1908 

MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Ball-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typeibar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — .Works 
in the .fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



LITERARY NOTES 



By PeUI I'm 

1 taring the parade of the - id° n 

uiri - in the procession 
Mr. Shaw. His wife he greeted 
with uplifted hat. The second was a man carry- 
ing a baby; the thir.l w an carrying a toy- 

ily one dog in the 
i. and that carried b) a woman. Only 
baby in the procession, and that carried by a 
man." The editor of the Vcademy comments 

this incident as follows: "It due- not seem to have 

occurred to Father Shaw that this procession, with 
solitary baby carried by a man and its solitary 
arried by a woman, was in a great measure 
Father Shaw'- own handiwork. We do not sup- 
that there was a woman in that perspiring, 
fluttering throng who was not deeply versed in the 
religion of Father Shaw. It is he who purveys for 
strident womankind the hulk of their wobbly argu- 
ments. It is he who has studiously impressed them 

with the importance of despising the order of 
things, and particularly with the importance of pre- 
tending to despise and distrust the male man. Their 
mouths are full of his cheap cynicisms as to mar- 
riage, and the desirabilit) of not hearing- children 
unless von are paid handsomely for doing it. Great 
in the Suffragist cam]) is the name of Shaw, and 
piteously appalling is the lack of habies, not to men- 
tion manners and such like. And we are not at all 
sure that the toy-dog should not be reckoned a 
Shawian affair. Mr. Shaw is a great iniventor of 
toy-dogs and similar gauds. He has toyed with the 
serious things of life to the mental destruction of 
Bayswater and the Shawian female, and we may 
see what we sec in the shape of processions and 
shouting spinsters in consequence. It is amusing to 
note that while Mr. S'naw himself deemed it utv 
wise to strut valiantly along Piccadilly with the 
women, sundry of his male admirers bad no such 
qualms. Here and there the cortege was garnished 
with a limping minor poet or so, and we hope that 
Mr. Shaw blushed for them. We. remember hear- 
ing a crusty critic of the old order remark that it 
was not the function of a minor poet to live in the 
best hotels, and it seems to us quite certain, that it 
is not the function of minor poets to hobble at the 
tail-ends of feminine demonstrations." 



G. P. Putnams will soon bring out a new edition 
of Mrs. Alfred Gatty's "Parables from Nature" 
which appeared in two series from 1855 to 1871, 
always haying been published in two volumes. 
They will now be brought out in one volume, with 
illustrations by Paul de Longpre of Hollywood. 



tions were dashed bj I rom Mr. I. S. Mill 

that he could nol write the article, as he had been 
forestalled by a notice which had appeared in " I he 
Westminster Review" itself. With a palpitating 
heart Browning rushed to his club and searched the 
pages of "The \\ estminstcr Review," to find, to his 

dismay, the article which had robbed him of J. S. 
Mill's notice : it was to this efl 
"A volume of poem- b\ Browning — balderdash!" 

When he had become Famous some one wanted 
very much to meet him. \ kind friend arranged a 
meeting, and the guest besieged Browning with 

questions and conversation during dinner, and , 

after dinner he continued buttonholing his victim. 
"Come," Said the poet, "this will never do; they 
will say 1 am monopolizing you." 



In Sir Algernon West's just-published reminis- 
cences of the Victorian era there are some more or 
less amusing stories of Browning: 

Robert Browning, the poet soni of a poet, still 
with his fame to make, but even then with a fund 
of anecdote and devoted to society even more than 
to poetry, full of ambition and eager for success, 
etc., had' been an author since the age of nineteen, 
and had already written, a tragedy, which was acted 
by Macready and Miss Helen Fattcit. When he 
produced an early volume of poems he was de- 
lighted at receiving a letter from Mr. J. S. Mill, pro- 
posing to write a notice of them in "The West- 
minster Review." A few days after, his expecta- 



New Books at the Public Library 
'•'England and the English: An Interpretation, by 

Ford Madox lluelt'er ( AlcClure. 1007). is one of the 
most delightful of appreciations. In the preface 
the author wonders why a Londoner should feel so 
much at home in New York and so little at home in 
Boston or Philadelphia. He explains the cause 
thus: "Philadelphia and Bostoni are small enough, 
old enough, crvstalized enough, to be provincial. 
New York is big enough, new enough, easy-going 
enough, to be metropolitan. For a metropolis, 
though it may contain a fragment of a building set 
up by Julius Caesar, is always young: a truly 
provincial city, though it may be founded only yes- 
terday, is always old. It is old because it has lived 
long enough to have learned all the lessons it is go- 
ing to learn and has evolved the sort of man it is 
always going to evolve In this sense London, 
though it has been where it is for a couple of thou- 
sand years, is infinitely younger than Philadelphia, 



Tke Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 
W._H. JtNKlNb, Mgr., Temporary Office. 1811 Orange Street 



DuBois <8t> Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street. Los Angeles, Cat. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets A "T"" S~> S~\ Q HP 
Draperies /\ [ ^\J O 1 

Lace Lurtains 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKa, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



and so is New York, though New York is, say three, 
and Philadelphia only two, hundred years old." In 
a final estimate of the English character he says : 
"The Englishman is always a poet, he is almost 
never a critic. . . . his great defect being his want 
of sympathetic imagination. It is this that has got 
him his reputation for hypocrisy — a reputation that 
is singularly undeserved.". As well for those who 
have been to London as for those who have not, 
this book will have a singular charm. 

*War of the Classes, by Jack London (McMillan, 
breezy and hopeful way, without malicious an- 
tagonism. He admits that "socialism is a menace. 
It is its purpose to wipe out, root and branch, all 
capitalistic institutions of present day society. It 
is distinctly revolutionary in scope", which charac- 
teristic is perhaps its best aspect, for every man of 
spirit is a law breaker at heart, fighting human law, 
inch by inch, a grudging conformist. Socialism is 
an attempt to re-establish divine necessity in place 
of the discourteous ethics which so discourage the 
freedom of our salutations; for who dare say "Good 
morning, my dear", to any pretty girl trammeled 
by a big brother? It is our ethics which poison our 
emotions and convert our loves into kicks which 
make the dogs howl. Mr. London evidently does 
not fear a fight and if his book breeds discontent it 
does not foster inaction. It is a pleasant ferment 
well worth reading. 

Adventures in High Mountains, by Richard 
Stead, affords tales of mountain climbing foolhardy 
and otherwise, and L'Emigre, by Paul Bourget, is 
the last French novel put into circulation. 

*Garibaldi's Defence of the Roman Republic, by 
George Macaulay Trevelyan (Longmans, 1907). 
Garibaldi had "in his personality something pecu- 
liarly captivating to the English, who saw in him 
the rover of great spaces of land and sea, the fighter 
against desperate odds, the champion of the op- 
pressed, the patriot, the humane and generous man, 
all in one. • He touched a chord of poetry and ro- 
mance -till latent in . "our hearts." Whether his 
memory will now appeal to the English readers of 
a £en*;ration yet further removed from nature, and 
sai I to be at once more sophisticated and less ideal- 
is' than the Victorian, is hard to say. 

Paris — in Its Splendour, by E. A. Reynolds-Ball 
(Estes, 1900), is in two portable volumes which 
form a good guide book to this city which is "the 
brain of the world." They are intended for read- 
ing rather than as pocket compendiums and might 
well serve as a provocative to a morning stroll were 
one in Paris, renewing, as they do, interest in many 
"sights". 

*An Artist's Reminiscences, by Walter Crane, 
(Macmillan, 1907). Walter Crane's name is one 
which is so well known that this simple narrative of 
his life will interest other readers besides artsts. He 
has traveled widely and met many men of note in 
various lands. He describes Los Angeles in 1890, 
when he was here, and speaks of "the mule carts 
which lent a Spanish touch to the streets". This 
was only eighteen years ago, and though the mules 
may survive the "carts" have disappeared. 

*Pekin to Paris, by Luigi Bargini (Kennesley, 
1908), is an account of the automobile race under- 
taken last summer by Prince Borghese, and has the 
enchantment of all new enterprises. It is well illus- 
trated and pleasantly written and 1 will doubtless 
find many readers — adventurers of the easy chair 
whose "wanderlust" is housed amid the comforts 



IMPERIAL 


VA LLE Y 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 


50 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftvis &. Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




Established 1889 



Phones Home Ex 531 
Main 7715 



'• TROY 
lAUNVRY 

THE 

BEST 



Largest Steam Laundry in 
Southern California 



Troy Laundry 
Company 

Corner 14th and Main Streets 

Uptown Offices 123% W. 3rd. 
223 W. 5th. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE BBS DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Jtrtistlc Designs 
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7l6 - 7l s 8 pij N U G T ^TREET 




Pacific Outlook 



19 



pictured voj 

- this week are two volumes of poems 

by Fiona Macleod (Prof. Sharp), The Immortal 

Hour and The Hour of Beauty, if which the first is 

ima in two acts. Oxford, h Peel and Minchin. 

he university city profusely illus- 

1 with colored plate9. Our Trees — How to 

Know Them, by I Weed, is a useful 

reference 1»>. .k compiled, however, chiefly for the 

-tern students. But on* page is given to 

the eucalyptus tree. 

There are tv Mexico this week, one 

called *Mexico and Her People of Today, by Nevin 
t i. Winter, and the other Two Bird Lovers in Mexi- 
co, by William Heche. Mr. Winter gives the names 
■ me of the pulque-dens in the city of Mexico 
which sound rather sacrilegious to us hut which are 
by the natives without disrespectful intent. 
They are "The Hang-out of John the Baptist", "The 
jjht of the Apostle", "i'he Fountain of the 
Angels", and so forth. The author Speaks of the 
country as the land of manana, esperase and poco 
tiempo. 

♦Books recommended. 

* + + 

Japan's Provincialism 

Despite the sudden extension of the sphere of her 
activity since 1868, says K. Asakawa, in the Atlan- 
tic. Japan's economic difficulty of maintaining- an 
increasing population with limited resources — a 
difficulty which is only beginning to be lessened by 
industrial openings abroad — seems to have retarded 
not a little the passing away of the cramped mental 
habit of old. The present Japan may indeed have 
so improved in this regard in recent years as to ap- 
pear almost a strange land to the Japanese of half 
a century ago or to the Korean of today. An Ameri- 
can win. does not relish even the rather innocent 
gossip of the New England town, and feels at odds 
with the narrow-minded social thinking in some 
countries of the old world, would be annoyed in 
Japan by the way in which every slight success ex- 
cites an unmerited applause from some and inevit- 
able jealousies from others, by the readiness with 
which the native mind moves along small artificial 
channels of thought and feeling, and by the petty 
criticisms and intrigues by means of which not a 
few seek to climb the ladders of life. It would 
seem singular, but it is a. natural result of their his- 
toric training, that the same people who have shown 
themselves to be capable at critical times of the ut- 
most sacrifice and of an absolute national unity, 
should in their daily struggle of life allow their 
minds to run into old grooves that neutralize the 
growth of open co-operations and manly conflicts. 

+ + + 
A Monstrous Knot 

A massive chair made out of a single tremendous 
pine knot is now standing in front of the Irrigation 
congress headquarters in Albuquerque, N. M. It is 
the largest pine knot ever seen in the southwest, 
measuring perhaps five feet through the thickest 
part. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

To Attend Furniture Exhibition 
Herbert Pease, vice-president of Pease Bros. Fur- 
niture Company, has gone East to select new goods. 
He will visit all the leading furniture centers and 
will attend the furniture exhibition. 




Exclusive 
Woman's Hatter 
French and CnglisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 



Otto Steincn Supply Co. 



Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Tabic Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 



We grind all kinds of Cutlery and 
do tt well. 



210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 





Ladies' 
Tailor 



Every garment made in my establishment is de- 
signed to suit the characteristics of each customer. 
My price and workmanship cannot be duplicated in the 
city. A call will convince you. 



903 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 

5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orfer on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
too Clippings - $ 500 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-°° 
250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



.An Allegory 

Location : Los Angeles. 

Times : Supposed to be hard. 

The devil was walking on Spring street with a 
few of his imps, when he noticed a happy-looking 
man om the other side of the street. He said to an 
imp: "Look at that happy-looking man over there. 
We want him. Go and get him." 

The imp went over to the man, hopped on his 
shoulder and whispered in his ear : 

Imp: You are discouraged. 

Man: No, I am not discouraged; 

Imp: You are discouraged. 

Man : I did not know t was discouraged. 

Imp : You are discouraged. 

Man: Well, perhaps I am. 

Imp : You are discouraged. Come with me. 

He went. 

The devil discovered another happy-looking in- 
dividual and sent the imp after him. In like man- 
ner the imp whispered : 

Imp: You are discouraged. 

Man : I am not discouraged. 

Imp: You are discouraged. 

Man : You are a liar ! - Get away from me ! 

The imp flew to his master and said : 

I AM DISCOURAGED. 

* + + 
TShe Tip Habit 

American travellers in Europe find a great deal of 
trouble with the omnipresent need of "tipping", 
those from whom they expect any service, however 
slight. They are very apt to carry it too far, or else 
attempt to resist it altogether. There is a story | 
told of a wealthy but ostentatious American in a 
Parisian restaurant. 

As the waiter placed his order before him he said, 
in a loud voice, "Waiter, what is the largest tip that 
you ever received?" 

"One thousand francs, monsieur." 

"Eh bien ! But I will give you 2,000," answered 
the upholder of American honor, and then in a mo- 
ment added : 

"May I ask who gave you the 1,000 francs?"_ 

"It was yourself, monsieur," said the obsequious 
waiter. 

Of quite an opposite mode of thought was an- 
other American, visiting London for the first time. 
Goaded to desperation by the incessant necessity for 
tips, he finally entered the washroom of his hotel, 
onlv to be faced with a large sign, which read : 

"Please tip the basin after using." 

"No," said the Yankee, turning on his heel; "I 
will go dirty first!" — Youth's Companion. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Geographical 

Little things frequently illustrate the English 
view of American geography very picturesquely. 
Ad Englishman had taken the Pacific express at 
Philadelphia, and, feeling tired, had retired to his 
berth. Just before he fell asleep he happened to 
remember that he had forgotten something, so he 
put is head out between the curtains and called : 

"Portah ! portah !" 

The porter came. 

"What is it, sir?" he said. 

"Please wake me when we get to Los Angeles, 
you know." — Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



He Located It 

A prominent citizen of Washington was traveling 
over a line of railway with which he was unfamiliar. 
At a certain point the road passes a fertilizer factory, 
the odor from which is offensive. It is particularly 
disagreeable to a lady who is compelled to make 
the journey daily. As a protection from the ob- 
noxious atmosphere she is accustomed to carry a 
bottle of lavender salts. As the train approaches 
the factory she produced the vial as usual, un- 
stopped it and applied it to her nostrils. Presently 
the odors from the factory began to permeate the 
car. The Washington man endured it as long as 
he felt that he could. At last he rose to his feet, 
and approaching the lady, said in his most polite 
manner : "Madam, may I request you to replace 
the stopper in that bottle?" 

* * * 

Prepared for trie End 

Down in Cochran, Ga., the affairs of civil justice 
are- administered by Judge Edwards, who is also 
an enthusiastic farmer, says the Nashville Banner. 
One cloudy spring afternoon court was convened 
to try a peculiarly tortuous and perplexing case. 
Judge Edwards listened with growing interest. He 
was' observed at last to seize a slip of paper, scribble 
a few words, place the document beneath a heavy 
paper weight and reached for his hat. 

"Captain," he called, cheerily, "excuse me for 
interruptin' you, suh ; you go right On with your 
argument, which is a darned good one. It's suah 
goini' to rain this evening, gentlemen, an' I got to 
set out my potatoes right away. But you go right 
on, captain! When you an' the major get through 
you'll all find my decision under this here paper 
weight." 

The door closed upon an astonished orator. 
+ * + 

His Proxy- 
Vicar — John, do you — er — ever use strong lan- 
guage? 

John (guardedly) — Well, sir, I — I may be a little 
bit keerless like im my speech at times. 

Vicar — Ah, I'm sorry, John. But we will con- 
verse about that some other time. Just now I want 
you to go to the plumber's and settle this bill for 
four pounds ten for thawing out a waterpipe. And 
you might talk to the man in a careless sort of way, 
as if it were your own bill! — Woman's National 
Daily. 

©56e Lig'ht that Failed 

The Bachelor and the Benedick were wending 
homeward their weary way. 

"Ah, you lucky married man !" sighed the Bach- 
elor. "Think of having a hearthstone, a real home, 
a waiting welcome ! Look — there is a light in the 
window for you !" 

"Gee ! So there is !" muttered the Benedick. 
"Well, there's only one way out of that — let's go 
back to the club." — Home Herald. 

Increased Expenses 

"Are vour five daughters all married off, Mr. 
Brown?" 

"No, five sons-in-law have married on." — Flie- 
gende Blaetter. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Pacific Coast Defenses 

It is undoubtedly assumed \t- ''"' per cent, "f "ur 
citizi the mattei an) consideration 

whatevei ny and Navy Life, that the i 

of the United States are in ;i high state of 
perfection. This i> far from being the case, and it has 
been so stated repeatedl) bj t the War De- 

partment in their annual reports, and before the 
Military anil Appropriation Committees of ' 

- one officer has put it : 
"We are in the same state that a man would be 
who. having 3 buy an outfit pf personal 

clothing, had bought dozen of hats, coats, vests 
shin- in short, many things — but had 

found when all his money was spent that he was 
short of si irs and trousers. We have plenty 

of harbors 'fortified': we have manufactured hun- 
dreds of guns and carriages, and Imilt hundreds of 
batteries as fine as any in the world; but there is no 
fori or harbor in the United States where the de- 
fenses are complete, where all the necessary power 

houses, searchlights, fire-control stations and sub- 
marine material have been supplied, and without 

which the whole is like a football team without a 
center rush and no quarterback — like a trolley sys- 
tem without a power house, and with the track laid 
at intervals." 

The records eloquently illustrate the reason for 
this — the indifference of the people in time of peace, 
and their hysterical activity during war, and for a 
very brief time subsequent thereto. By an act of 
March 3. 1895, Congress authorized a joint board of 
army and navy officers and civilians — known as the 
Endicott Board — to draw up a plan for the defense 
of the coasts of the United States. 

The plans of this board have formed the basis of 
all subsequent appropriations by Congress. Presi- 
dent Roosevelt convened a new board on January 
15. 1005 — known as the Taft Board, to revise the 
plans of the Endicott Board. The report of the 
Taft Board, wdiile not yet formally approved by 
Congress, will form the basis of future appropria- 
tions. 

The first appropriation made by Congress to carry 
out the plans of the Endicott Board was $1,950,000 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1889. From that 
date up to June 30, 1896, the appropriations ran from 
$712,008.23 for 1890 to $2,345,900 for 1891. In 1896, 
shortly before the trouble with Spain, the appro- 
priations were jumped for the year ending June 30, 
1897, to $543,168. 

For the next three years the appropriations were, 
respectively, $8,319,090. $9,954,340.46 and $10,869,- 
050.28. By this time (June 30, 1899) the war with 
Spain was over, and for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1900, the appropriations were reduced to $3,- 
064,802. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1907, 
they were only $1,624,000! 

Besides the appropriations as above mentioned, 
$47,452,899 has been appropriated for the pos- . 
sessions of states for fortifications, for gun carriage 
manufactories, for the maintenance of repairs, and 
for the purchase of ammunition. The harbors that 
have been fortified are Kennebec River, Portland, 
Portsmouth, Boston, New Bedford, Narragansett 
Bay, Eastern Entrance, L. I.; Southern Entrance, 
New York ; Eastern Entrance, New York; Hampton 
Roads, Baltimore, Potomac River, Delaware River, 
Cape Fear River, Charleston. Savannah, Key West. 
Tampa, Mobile Bay, Mississippi River, Galveston, 



San Diego, San ! I olumbia River and 

Pugct Sound. In all ', ich mortal 
inch. 1-inch and 12-inch rifles, and 587 rapid 

guns have b< ■ laft Bo 

mated $50,879,339 . ,,-y to build the defenses 
of thi irts. 

The strength of th< ii ations of 
Coast, and details of what i- necessary to complete 

the same, are as follow 

San Oil I i in hand : 4 10-inch 

guns, <' rapid-lire guns; 5 officers, 1M men. 

essar) to complete : 4 searchlights, 13 ofl 
399 men; $40,000 for power plant, $99,000 Foi 

control S) stem. 

Columbia River— Constructed or on hand; 8 10- 
inch guns. 3 -inch guns, 17 rapid-fire guns', 16 mor- 
tars, 12-inch; 10 officers, 240 men. 

Necessary to complete: 8 12-inch mortars; 9 
searchlights; 74 officers, 1,613 men; $220,000 for 

power plant. $270,000 for tire-control system. 

l'uget Sound — Constructed or on hand: 4 12-inch 

guns, 8 10-inch guns, 3 X-ineh guns, 48 rapid-fire 
guns, 40 12-inch mortars, 1 searchlight. 17 officers, 
902 men. 

Necessary to complete: 7 14-inch guns. 2 12-inch 
guns, 11 rapid-fire guns, 8 12-inch mortars, 17 search- 
lights, $518,000 for power plant, $360,000 for fire- 
control. 199 officers, 4,794 men. 

San Francisco — Constructed or on hand : 18 12- 
inch guns. 5 10-inch guns, 8 8-inch guns, 39 rapid- 
fire guns, 56 12-inch mortars; 1 searchlight; 43 offi- 
cers, 1,394 men. 

Necessary to complete: 2 12-inch 'guns, 8 12-inch 
mortars; 18 searchlights: 183 officers, 4.560 men; 
$528,000 for power plant, $84,000 for fire-control 
system. 

4 $ •!■ 

Perfection's Cost 

Oscar Hammerstein, at a recent dinner, described 
a contemplated cast for "Thais," wherein the prin- 
cipals' salaries alone would aggregate $10,000 a 
night. 

"But you know," said Mr. Hammerstein, "per- 
fection is always expensive." 

"Napoleoni never breakfasted at the same hour. 
Now he would breakfast at 7, now at 11, now at 10. 
Yet, whenever he rang for his breakfast a young 
broiled chicken was always brought immediately 
to him, cooked to perfection, just off the grill. 

"One morning Napoleon sent for his cook and 
said, with a pleased laug'h : 

" 'How do you manage it that, no matter when I 
breakfast, my chicken, is always ready, done to a 
turn?' 

" 'Sire,' said the cook, 'every ten minutes I put a 
fresh chicken' on to broil. Thus one is always per- 
fectly done for you when you ring.' " 






Japanese and Oriental 

ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS AN-D EMB%OI'DERIES 



You make no. mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

KaT^iuchi Bros. i%$L 

533 South Broadway 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



My NamesaKe 

By Grandma 
'Neath the wide spreading shade of the oak, 

Wc have tenderly laid her to rest. 
The turf has been strewn with sweet flowers, 

The blossoms, that she loved the best. 
In the springtime of life, in the morn of her youth, 

Ere sorrow had dimmed her bright eyes, 
She unfolded her wings, and has gone from our ken; 

But we know she's not lost, we shall find her again. 
In that beautiful realm of light and love, 

Her freed spirit frets not at control; 
Like a bird loosed from bondage, on pinions of light 

She trills the glad song of her soul. 
But we miss her here, and we miss her there, 

Oh yes, we miss her everywhere. 
We call her name, but do not hear 

Her answer. "I am very near". 
Lo, God, we know that thy great love 

Will keep our treasure where 
No moth or rust can it corrupt. 

And w-e shall find her there. 

+ * + 

U/je Auto Miss 

Honk! Honk! along the country road 

The auto horn you year, 
And at the wheel there sits a maid 

Who disregards all fear. 
At Perkins' mill pond down the way 

She takes the sharpest curve — 
She does not slack her car a bit 

But speeds with daring nerve. 

The geese, they fly across the road, 

And feathers fly also, 
She does not stop her big, red car 

But fairly lets her go. 
Cy Perkins shouts aloud for fair 

When she stirs up his geese, 
But it doesn't feaze the auto Miss, 

Her speed she does increase. 

She scares old Hiram Harper's mare, 

And Hiram, he gets mad — 
This pleases much this charming Miss, 

She laughs aloud most glad — 
Honk! Honk! she flies on down the way. 

The farmers fear this Miss. 
But in this she finds life a joy — 

'Tis her ideal bliss. 

— John J. Beekman in Brooklyn Eagle. 

* * * 

Very TaKing 

She took a long, kind look at me. 
She took my hand in childlike glee — 

This was the night I met her — 
And then she took me 'neath a bower 
Of palms and things and took an hour, 

To 'bind my silken fetters. 

She took my Fido, prince of pets, 
She took my tons of violets — 

O, ladies — sweet beguilers — 
She took my gloves, she took my books, 
She took my sighing, ardent looks, 

She to6k my costly Huyler's. 

She took my rides, she took my walks, 
She took my dances and my talks, 

This charmingest of misses. 
She took more time than I could spend, 
She took — well, just before the end, 

S'he took some harmless kisses. 

She took my ring, of course, next day — 
(Our courts'hip went the proper way — 

O, this is nothing yellow!) 
She took more troths than I can pen, 
In short she took me in and then 

She took the other fellow. 

— Richmond Times-Dispatch. 







'"''>>-";j.'i..' J vOT 

,1 \5fn'11i; l^*^*****^*^^^?"^ 




(J-l l^p . ^"WttVnVe.«^ 



Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



[ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 
Offices with Common Reception 
Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $ 1 2.50 



MSIEUS cDMELIMm 



A Southwestern Weekly 



Gmmrga Rakwr Jtndmrson 

COlTOM 



H. C. Jkckvrty 

PRESIDENT 



Published mvmry Saturday 
Llamnmr Build ng. Lorn J9ngrles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Jub$cription pricr S7.oo a ymar In advance. Jingle copy S 
cwntt on alt nwwa standi. 

tnif tri ai wfcnJ-clm matte ( April (, nj," , at thr po*to*ce at I.oi Angeles, 
California, under I be act of Congm* oi March |, 1879. 

Vol. 5. Los Angeles. Cat., August I. 1908 Alo. 5 



I01»fi0tatl0()0i«i0!'i' 

* A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY * 



' The consciousness of a feeling of good will and g 

% love toward others is the most powerful and most jj 

healthy tonic in the world. It is a wonderful stimu- O 

Blant, for it enlarges, sustains and ennobles life. It jK 

kills selfishness and scatters envy and jealousy. — j)j 
M Elbert Hubbard. 



PARTICULAR NOTICE 
&/>e Pacific OutlooK's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial ; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or local interest. 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
AS WE PREDICTED in these columns last 
week, the voters of Los Angeles are to have an 
opportunity to decide for themselves whether they 
desire to have the City Charter modified in the 
direction of the elimination, or partial elimination, 
of ward influence in the council. The Municipal 
League, an organization in whose history is to be 
found ample warrant for the belief that its interest 
in local politics is unselfish, inspired by patriotic 
motives, has undertaken to put the popular will in 
this matter to the test by invoking the right of peti- 
tion conferred upon the people of Los Angeles by 

the Constitution. The league has 

Appeal to requested Judge John D. Works, 

the Sovereign Frank G. Finlayson and W T . B. 

Mathews, the committee appointed 
by the charter revision committee to outline a new 
charter, together with James A. Anderson, who ren- 
dered conspicuous service to the committee, to re- 



port such proposed amendment- to the charter as, 

in their opinion, are urgently needed. These prob- 
ably will he in harmon) with the recommendations 
made by the committee up to the time when the 
council peremptorily refused to permit the charter 

question to be Submitted to the people. A- soon as 
these amendments shall have been submitted to it, 
the league will prepare for circulation petitions re- 
questing the council to call an election for the purr 
pose of voting on the proposed amendments. When 
the number of signatures required by law shall 
have been obtained the council will have no option 
in the matter. It will be compelled to order the 
election asked for. The provisions suggested by 
the original committee have been widely discussed 
in the public prints and doubtless are familiar to all 
intelligent men. If the Municipal League's com- 
mittee recommend that these proposed amendments 
be submitted to popular vote it is to be hoped that 
every believer in a truly representative form of gov- 
ernment for cities will co-operate to the fullest ex- 
tent with the league in its efforts to secure the re- 
quisite number of signatures, and afterward work- 
heart and soul for success at the polls. It is time 
that the control of the city by the ward politician 
were broken. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE CITY OF OAKLAND is having an experi- 
ence somewhat like that through which Los An- 
geles recently passed. Its council is "delaying" ac- 
tion on the matter of permitting the people to vote 
for or against a. new City Charter. The Oakland 
Enquirer, in discussing the course of the ward poli- 
ticians in the council, remarks: "It is beginning to 
dawn upon the people of Oakland 
"Official that the present system of city ad- 
Absolutism," ministration is a denial of the funda- 
mental principles of government by 
the people in favor of an official absolutism. A few 
city councilmen can defy the will of the people of 
an entire city and become dictators." There is 
some evidence that "it is beginning to dawn upon 
the people" of Los Angeles, too, that the existing 
system of municipal government is remote from 
government by the people. We hardly believe that 
"official absolutism" will be permitted to thrive for 
long in Los Angeles. 

* * * 

IF THERE W r ERE no other reason on earth 
why the candidates of the Lincoln-Roosevelt Re- 
publican League should be the choice of the Repub- 



Pacific Outlook 



lican voters at the primaries this month and the 
choice of the people at the election next November, 
that found in the attitude of the so-called regular 
Republican organization — which in reality, as all in- 
telligent men know, is the boss-ridden machine 
which seeks and depends partially upon the race- 
track gamblers for support — is am- 
One Great pie. If there were no other issue 
Reason Why before the people of California, this 
ought to be enough of an issue to 
cause, decent people, defenders of the home, enemies 
of the devil, in whatever guise he may be found, to 
rally about the standard raised by the league. Next 
winter hordes of criminals w J ll infest Los Angeles 
and the surrounding towns. They will come to us 
to inaugurate another reign of terror upon the in- 
vitation of Arcadia, that 'hell on earth made pos- 
sible by the "regular" Republican organization, 
which has defeated every effort to make racetrack 
gambling in this state illegal. 

* * * 

THE "REGULAR" organization, through its 
tools in the state legislature, will do nothing to put 
an end to .the menace to life and property contained 
in the presence of this home for desperadoes. The 
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League pledges its 
candidates for the legislature, if elected, to work and 
vote for a bill making the racetrack gambler an out- 
law. No such candidates can be chosen unless the 
Republican voters go to the polls this month and 
choose delegates who will nominate for the legis- 
lature mien known to stand unequivocally for the 
safety of life and the home as against 
Here Lies the reign of lawlessness which is cer- 
Your Duty tain to follow the election of a legis- 
lature the majority in which will go 
to Sacralmemto under pledge to keep their hands off 
the friends and supporters of the machine — the race- 
track gamblers, with their satellites — highwaymen, 
burglars, thugs and murderers. Any citizen who re- 
fuses to participate in the August primaries will 
fail to do his whole duty to his city and his state. 
Those who indulge in the folly of supporting the 
men put forward by the friends and advocates of the 
racetrack terrorites may live to regret the day 
when they failed to take a hand in the only well- 
organized movement to smother this particular 
species of vice which has ever been inaugurated in 
California. 

* * v 

IN THE CURRENT number of the Pacific 
Monthly Shiuiehiro Saito, a Japanese who has been 
intimately identified with his government and who 
has lived at various times in America, where he was 
educated, writing on "The Coming Struggle in the 
Far East" makes this statement : "We are of that 
class of people who, with a high estimation of the 
individual character of the Chinese place but little 



regard for his national potentialities ; and the ex- 
perience of two hundred years of China's contact 
with the western civilization and all its beneficent 
influences do not testify to her capability of con- 
solidation as a nation. We are bound frankly to 
say that the Chinese will, before long, be the people 
of no country; that is to say, the Chinese will be 
there and everywhere the world over, but China as 
a nation will be swept off from the 
Chinese political map of the world." He bases 
Incapability his prediction on China's apparent in- 
ternal disintegration, Russian teacity 
in the north, the German movement toward Pekin, 
the British grip in the valley of the Yang-tse-Kiang, 
and the French ambition in the direction of certain 
provinces, and fears, that "it is not within the abil- 
ity, of the Pekin statesmen, or of the Nankin man- 
darins, to stop the tide of disintegration and for- 
• eign occupation." He makes a convincing argu- 
ment, which is worthy of studious perusal by those 
who have been fearing the "yellow peril". He be- 
lieves that China will be the author of her own poli- 
tical undoing; that America and other civilized 
countries will not need to prepare to cope with the 
yellow race. What he predicts is a possibility which 
"has for a long time occurred to every observant 
student of the Asiatic politics." This writer may 
be in error, but he presents an array of fact and 
argument that go a long way toward bringing con- 
viction that the contrary is probably true. 

* * * 

IN ITS SCAMPER to meet the demands of pub- 
lic opinion (?) the city council has gone from one ex- 
treme to the other, jumping from the frying-pan 
into the fire, as it were. We believe it acted too 
hastily and not very wisely in adopting the new 
ordinance regulating speaking on the public streets. 
In endeavoring to put an end to ithe gathering of 
socialists on the streets, at the expense of impeding 

traffic, it has also made it illegal for 
The Two the Salvation Army and other evan- 
Extremes gelical workers to hold meeting's 

where religious effort in behalf of the 
masses will be accompanied by the greatest bene- 
fits. Probably no other organizations accomplish 
more good than the Salvation Army and the Volun- 
teers of America. The "congested district" of the 
city is their most fertile field. That the council has 
made it impossible for these organizations to con- 
tinue their meetings, which usually take place after 
the busy hours of the day, in almost the only sec- 
tions where they will bear fruit, is to be deplored. 

* + * 

WITH DUE RESPECT to those members of 
the council who, as a rule, keep their heads in the 
face of trying' situations, we believe they have al- 
lowed themselves to be led into a grave error. They 



Pacific Outlook 



ably realize the fact bj this time. Is it not 

raft an ordinance which will bear the ear- 
marks of sanity and commo is it not 

. and just, t'> pern speaking in certain 

called "i district", at 

hours when traffic will n< >t be interfered with? The 
have rights equal to those of Democrats, 
Republicans, Congregationalists 
Take the and equal suffragists — no greater, 
Middle Ground no li ss Justice dictates that the 
Salvation Army and the Volun- 
Vmercia should not be kicked off the streets 
just becat cialisl agil nor has been blocking 

the whe« t traffic. The council need not 

"play fa' ■ accomplish what it is after; it 

nee.: slate specifically against any one class: 

but it does seem that the legal department of the 
city should he aide to draft an ordinance giving 
equal rights to all and yet compel the street social- 
ist to behave in an orderly manner, at the same time 
ng the>e two evangelical organizations an oppor- 
tunity to reach the classes which are to be found 
in greatest abundance in the now proscribed dis- 
trict. 

* + * 

A FRIEND relinked us a few weeks since for 
having printed an editorial under the caption "Har- 
rimanization of Los Angeles", iii which we in- 
dulged in a lament over the announcement that Ed- 
ward H. Harriman had obtained virtual control of 
the electric railway system of this city. Now comes 
the city assessor with an abundance of evidence that 
the interests represented by Mr. Harriman own 
forty-five per cent of the Los An- 
And It geles Railway system. To be exact 

Came to Pass we should not have said Mr. Harri- 
man had obtained absolute control, 
perhaps: but it is quite evident that his interest in 
this system has become important enough to enable 
him to say what shall and what shall not be done. 
With Mr. Harriman dominating the Los Angeles, 
the Pacific Electric and the Los Angeles-Pacific 
companies, is there not ample ground for the in- 
ference that the city has been "Harrimanized" ? For 
does not the control of the railway system mean 
paramountcy of influence in municipal politics in a 
crisis? 

* ♦ ♦ 

AMERICAN'S have been taught to respect the 
courts of the land. Especially is this true in the 
case of the federal courts. Higher than every other 
branch of government, rising superior to the Con- 
gress, even above the presidency itself, there is one 
court whose mandates, in the final appeal, are su- 
preme. This body, the Supreme Court of the United 
States, is not far removed above the United States 
Court which recently decided that the trial court 



exceeded its pi i Hie ting upon Standard oil 

a heavv penalty for what it deemed 
Confidence infractions of a law intended to place 
Tottering the rich and powerful on an equality 
with the poor and weak. That the 
decision of this court is extremely unpopular is a 
incut thai will not admit of argument. That 
it is based upon exact justice is i proposition which 
does admit of argument. Whether the conn's opin- 
ion will be sustained, in the end. li tin I i ml of last 
resort, does nol affect the fact that popular faith in 
the absolute integrity of the courts appears to have 
been somewhat shaken, in spite of the esteem and 

confidence in which the members of the court in 

question have always been held, by both the legal 
profession and the laity. 

* + + 
IT L< M >'KS. at first view, like an unimportant 
thing, this matter of the dog-catcher and the city 
pound, but there evidently has been enough of graft 
in connection with the administration of this par- 
ticular bureau of government to warrant one of two 
conclusions, namely: The office should be reformed 
or abolished. In all probability, judging by the out- 
come of some of the recent efforts toward reform in 
a certain public institution, which for the present 
shall be nameless, all efforts to bring about a reform 
in the conduct of this particular of- 
Dogs and . fice would result in a lavish display 
Other Brutes of whitewash ; so that all that ap- 
pears to be left is to abolish the of- 
fice. Some have suggested the adoption of the 
Pasadena or the Rochester system. We do not 
know what either of these systems calls for, but 
on general principles we are for either one as 
against the present loose method of handling the 
stray canine problem. Nothing could be worse, 
more brutal, than the present system. If one-third 
of the charges made against the administrators of 
the tramp dog law be susceptible of being sustained 
the dog authorities ought to be given a few doses 
of the treatment they accord the sufferers which 
fall into their hands, before a new ordinance shall 

be adopted. 

•fr + <• 

AFTER MILES and acres and tons of talk, 
something definite in regard to the project for con- 
verting a portion of the Arroyo Seco into a park 
now appears in sight. A number of women resid- 
ing in Garvanza and South Pasadena, including the 
original promoters of the scheme, are preparing to 
organize, as soon as possible, an Arroyo Seco Park 
Promotion Club. While it is natural that those 
residents of the city who live near the site of the 
proposed park should exhibit the 
Arroyo Seco keenest interest in the subject, it is 
Project fair that the inhabitants of all sec- 

tions of both cities, and especially 
of Los Angeles, should lend a hand. The time is 



6 



Pacific Outlook 



not far distant when Los Angeles and Pasadena 
will be one city, excepting, possibly, that corpora- 
tion lines may not be entirely obliterated for sev- 
eral generations to come, and the proposal to give 
to the entire community such a beauty spot as that 
which can be formed upon the foundation Nature 
has given us is one that should meet unanimous ap- 
proval and enlist the heartiest co-operation of all 
public-spirited citizens. 

WE HAVE TOO FEW parks— perhaps not too 
few for the Los Angeles of today, but assuredly too 
few, in number and in area, for the Los Angeles of 
the future. Our present improved city parks are 
small and probably never will be increased in area. 
In the Griffith park foundation we have what may 
be made one of the grandest parks in the country. 
In the Arroyo Seco we have another possibility that 
would never be relinquished by some communities. 
If left open for subdivision into building lots it will 
rapidly become smaller and smaller until, within 
three or four years, there will not be left enough to 
bother with, for park purposes. Far better would 
it have been if this site had been pur- 
Let Us chased four or five years, ago, even if the 
Be Big work of development should have been de- 
layed until several years later. Los An- 
geles, famed the world over, can well afford to be 
big in its handling of park projects. -It can well af- 
ford, and indeed it would be a most profitable in- 
vestment, to buy outright all the land embraced 
within the limits of the park proposed by these 
women in the northern suburbs, even if the money 
to pay for its improvement may not be available for 
five years or more to come. The necessary outlay 
now will be small compared to what it would be 
then. And by utilizing this magnificent offering of 
Nature in the adornment of the city, we may con- 
fidently anticipate the time when Los Angeles shall 
be regarded as the most beautiful city, as well as 
climatically one of the most perfect, in the world. 
* * * 

THE BUSINESS INTERESTS of Los Angeles 
have suffered a distinct loss in the death of O. J. 
Barker, for many years a member of the well-known 
firm of Barker Brothers, furniture dealers. The 
concern with which he had been identified is one of 
the oldest and most substantial in the city. More 
than a quarter of a century has passed since its 
founder, O. T. Barker, father of O. J. Barker, en- 
gaged in the furniture business in this city, and it 
has been eighteen years since the sons of the elder 
Barker engaged in business as 
The Monument the Barker Brothers Company. 

He Builded The history of this great institu- 
tion is coincidental with the his- 
tory of the modern Los Angeles. Its exemplary 
operations have done much toward giving to the 



business interests of the city the high tone which 
has always characterized them. The example of 
honest dealing set by this firm, of progressive, public 
spirit, of willingness to assist in every possible way 
in the material development of the community, have 
made the name of these brothers a synonym for 
business integrity. A good name is more to be de- 
sired than riches, and the splendid characteristics 
of Mr. Barker, which will be remembered for years 
to come, are the best monument to his sterling 
worth. 

* * * 

ONE OF THE MOST important events of the 
year will be the assembling in Washington, next 
month, of the Anti-Tuberculosis Congress. Never 
before in the history of medical science has there 
been so much evidence of widespread determination 
to ascertain and bring within reach of all means for 
the prevention and cure of this dread malady. It 
was not until the disease had been admitted to be 
contagious that this general warfare against it was 
inaugurated. Many physicians who 
Fighting have studied the progress of tubercu- 
the Plague losis have expressed the belief that 
fear of contagion has been a prolific 
cause of its spread. That fear has entered largely 
into the spread of many diseases is undoubtedly 
true, for it has been repeatedly demonstrated. The 
prevention of the disease is the thing that science 
is aiming at more particularly. It occupies para- 
mount attention now as in the past. The proceed- 
ings of the approaching congress will be watched 
with intense interest the world over, and probably 
with as great interest in California and the whole 
Southwest as anywhere else. 

* + + 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE. SAY 



Every Man's Duty 
Henry Cabot Lodgb 

The personal qualities and individual abilities of 
public men have a profound effect upon the meas- 
ures and policies which make the history and deter- 
mine the fate of the nation. Often they originate 
the measures or the policies, and they always mod- 
ify and formulate them. Therefore, it is essential 
that every man who desires to be a useful citizen, 
should not only take part in moulding public senti- 
ment, in selecting candidates-, and in winning elec- 
tions for the party or the cause in which he believes, 
but he should also be familiar with the characters, 
abilities and records of the men who must be the 
instruments by which the policies are to be carried 
out and the government administered. There are 
many ways, therefore, in which men may benefit 
and aid their fellowmen, and serve the state in 
which they live, but it is open to all men alike to 
help to govern the country and direct its course 
along the passing years. In the performance of this 
duty in the ways I have tried to indicate, any man 






Pacific Outlook 



can atta.- citizenship of the highest useful- 

much to saj that "iir success as 
ills upon the useful citizen- who act 
intelligently anil eff politic-. 



Effects of Graft 

D Of MASSACHUSETTS 

i Iran could never exist but for the man behind 

nan who is doing more for social- 

munism and anarch) today than any other 

table business man who for any 

>n buys legislation. The strongest argument 

nment ownership, the argument of despair. 

wnership is the only relief from graft. 

Wth of a condition and thai con- 
ditio ind on the pan of those 
ir eyes to the evils which c\i-t around 

them. The danger of socialism is not greater than 

that of Kraft, because from the one comes the other. 

manipulations of grafters make nun socialists. 



The People Right, and Will Control 
Gov. Fort of Nkw Jkrsfv 

The most vital thing in the Republic today is the 
maintenance of the independence and integrity of 
the judiciary. The executive and legislative 
bran government are both popular branches, 

and. naturally, they will follow the political ten- 
dencies of their times, the sentiment of the hour. 
But the judicial arm must not do so. It must 
be the one branch of government where public 
sentiment will have no place and where it cannot 
reach the official or control his action. 

When it is contemplated what judicial construc- 
tion has done to broaden the constitution and to am- 
plify its powers, the force of the statement that the 
judicial branch of the government must be kept 
free from political contamination becomes the more 
apparent. 

The future of this Republic was never brighter. 
A few misguided or corrupt men cannot kill the na- 
tion. As long as the people are right they will con- 
trol the situation: and the people are right. When- 
ever they are awake and aroused they clo things. 



Men and Government 

Secretary Elihu Root 
A large part of mankind still regards government 
as something quite apart from the main business of 
life — something which is undoubtedly necessary to 
enable them to attend to their business, but only 
incidental or accessory to it. They plough and sow 
and harvest; they manufacture and buy and sell; 
they practice the professions and the arts ; they 
write and preach ; they work and they play, under 
subconscious impression that government is. some- 
thing outside all this business — a function to be 
performed by some one else with whom they have 
little or no concern, as the janitor of an apartment 
house, whom somebody or other has hired to keep 
out thieves and keep the furnace running. In real- 
itv, government is an essential part in every act of 
all this wide range of human activity. If it is bad, 
ruin comes to all : if it is good, success comes ac- 
cording to capacity and courage. * * * Men 
must either govern or be governed; they must take 
part in the control of their own lives, or they must 
lead subject lives, helplessly dependent in the lit- 
tle things and great things of life upon the will and 
power of others. 



A Fable 

By Oi-timi s 
I wo Frogs who would a-wooing go came in their 
Wandering- to a Dairy, and through Curiosity fell 
into a pail of Milk. The) kicked merrily, but 

grew tired and searched fruitlessly for a Resting 

place. Finall) one said in Despair: "I can't keep 
I p any longer. I must give up and go Mown." 

■'Cheer up," encouraged the other. "Never sa) 

Die. Keep a-kickin'. Something will turn up." 

The worn-oul Frog renewed his Efforts, but Fear 

again took p. SSession and he said: 

"No use. I've stood n as long a- I can. Poor me, 
I've got t,, Sink." 

I he othei again attempted to cheer him. saying: 
"Don't be a Quitter,— stick to the Ship. Keep a 
stiff Upper l.ip and keep kickin'." 

rhe fading Energies of the weaker revived some- 
what, bin soon be Faltered, cried "Good-bye", sank 

and was Drowned. The more Courageous Frog 

Followed his own Advice, and by constant kicking 
churned up a large Hall of Butter, which gave him 

1 Footl old from which lie leaped out of the pail to 
Safety. 

+ * * 

"Remorse"— in Epigram 

By William George Jordan 
Regret tottooed into memory. 
The insomnia of the soul. 
Conscience turning state's evidence. 
An agony of sorrow at the grave of a wrong, 
(diosts of evil deeds haunting a life. 
Standing prisoner, self confessed, before the bar 
of conscience. 

A life thrown into eclipse by an act. 
The knell "Too late!" ringing through the soul. 
Living under the lash of conscience. 
Memory's revenge for irreparable wrong. 

* ♦ ♦ 

As Your Neighbors See You 

If you happen to be poor, you are a bad manager. 

If you are rich, you never could have obtained 
such wealth honestly. 

If you need credit, you can't get it. 

If you do not need credit, everybody wants to do 
you a favor. 

If you are in politics, it's for office — or "pie". 

If you are out of politics, you can't be placed, or 
you are no good to your country. 

If you don't give to charity, you are stingy. 

If you are charitable, it's for show. 

If you take an active interest in religious matters, 
you are a hypocrite. 

If you take no active interest in religion, you are 
a hopeless sinner. 

If you exhibit affection, you are "soft". 

If you seem to care for no one particularly, you 
are cold-blooded. 

If you die young you will regret it, for there sure- 
ly would have been a "great future" in store for you. 

If you attain a good old age, you have missed 
your calling. 

So — you pays your money and you takes your 
choice. 

* + + 

Safe 

Many a .nan who is proud of his ancestry prob- 
ably would not care to know just how his ancestors 
would feel about him, if they could give expression 
to their thoughts. 



Pacific Outlook 




A. Newcomer from Indiana Tahes Exceptions to Some THing's 
He Has Seen and Heard in Los Angeles 



f/gjflij! HANKS, many thanks to the Pacific Out- 
HHllI ' ,>l! ' c tlir ' lavm g given me an opportunity to 

-■" ' l ® "air my views" relative to certain things 
which have impressed me since Los An- 
geles has become my home. I trust that 
the editor will call a halt when he believes that I am 
overstepping the bounds of prudence or propriety. 

I intimated last week that my brain was burdened 
with thoughts upon the recent act of the City Coun- 
cil in setting at naught all the work of the charter 
revision commission, after having authorized this 
body to outline a new charter. While I have some 
very strong views of my own on this matter, views 
which cannot be properly expressed except by the 
use of language fully as strong as the opinions 
themselves, it struck me that perhaps it might be 
the better part of valor to put my fingers on the 
public pulse and count its beats before I let myself 
go. So I did so. My acquaintance is not very ex- 
tensive, but I found eleven men of affairs whom f 
know fairly well — well enough, at least, to warrant 
me in asking them for expressions of opinion on 
the attitude of the council on this matter — and 
here are the replies I received, verbatim : 

"An insult to the whole city." 

"An insult to the gentlemen w ; ho served on the 
commission." 

"One of "the most brazen attempts to prevent the 
consummation of the wishes of the great majority 
of the inhabitants of which any council has ever 
been guilty." 

"Oh, what's .the use?" 

"It is simply conclusive evidence of what I have 
always believed — that the present council, like most 
of its predecessors, cares nothing whatever about the 
future welfare of the city, but that the chief ambi- 
tion of the politicians w'ho compose its majority is 
to get everything they can in the way of material 
for strengthening the existing political machines 
while the present system of municipal government 
exists." 

"It is the work of the cheap, selfish, short-sighted 
ward politician." 

"Rotten — if you will pardon the term ; but what 
else should one have expected?" 

"One of the best things that ever happened. It 
is just what we have needed to convince us that the 
only way to put the quietus on the present system 
of 'government by wards' is to amend the charter, 
at once, by eliminating the ward influence entirely. 
Then, and probably not until then, will sane and 
sensible municipal government for Los Angeles be 
possible of attainment." 

"Proof of the frequent charges made in such pa- 
pers as the Express, that the council is dominated 
by men who care not a fig for decent government." 

"Fine! Great! It hastens the dav when the svs- 
tem of municipal government shall be revolu- 
tionized." 

"Excuse me, sir: I try to be a gentleman at all 



times, and to reply truthfully to your question 
would necessitate the use of words which would 
convict me of being the direct contrary." 

After having concluded my search and reviewed 
the expressions of opinion secured, which I had 
carefully committed to paper, I reached the con- 
clusion that the sum total of these opinions coincid- 
ed with my own individual ideas. And ever since I 
have been wondering why on earth the people of a 
great, fine city like Los Angeles submit to such an 
outrageous piece of insolence on the part of the 
majority of their chosen "representatives", and how 
long they will continue to submit without a mur- 
mur. 

I have never had the pleasure of meeting that 
morally healthy, aggressive and thoroughly decent 
young man who is endeavoring, in the pursuit of 
his official duties, to compel the disorderly element 
in the city to abide by the laws. I refer to Thomas 
L. Woolwine. Stranger though he is, I am sure 
that the qualifying terms I have used in reference to 
him have been correctly applied. I am judging him 
by his works and by his attempted works. No 
young man who is striving to do what he has set 
his hand to perform can be anything but morally 
healthy and thoroughly decent. 

A few years ago I became much interested in the 
work undertaken by a young fellow in Missouri, 
named Hadley, who had been invested with author- 
ity to proceed against violators of the law. Hadley 
found himself strictly "up against it", to use the 
slang of the day, when he set himself to the task 
of regulating the morals of the community accord- 
ing to the standard established by the law. Like 
many another prosecuting officer, he found that 
some of the strongest "interests" were dead against 
him, determined to nullify his labors, if that were 
possible. 

I perceive that many of the so-called "best citi- 
zens" of Los Angeles are opposing this young Mr. 
Woolwine, intimating that they believe him to be 
attempting to interfere with a sort of "vested right" 
to sell whiskey, debauch manhood and womanhood 
and a few other things. Cowards, are they? Sel- 
fish, self-satisfied, hypocritical Twentieth Century 
Pharisees? Or are they replicas of one of old who 
simply wanted to be "let alone"? 

I am credibly informed that what we commonly 
know as the liberal, or "wide open", element in 
Los Angeles makes the boast that not while the 
present city administration stands guard over it 
will the brothel system suffer materially at the 
hands of any such Puritanical crusader as young 
Woolwine. I am told that even our mayor has put 
himself on record as being disposed to handle the 
problem presented by the houses of prostitution 
with gloves; that the police department, which en- 
forces some laws because the laws were made to be 
enforced, refuses to enforce the statutes which de- 



Pacific Outlook 



shall not exist, anil 
ilia; i upants alike shall be 

punii -can this be true ? — the police 

that tins particular law 

I am amazed, astounded, horrified and disgusted. 

The ■ rs. each of whom has 

pledged himself under ith, it is u> be pre- 

sumed, refusing or neglecting ti> give the chief of 
e authority i r specific orders to enforce a plain 
law after attention has been repeatedly dine:. 
the fact • -is this not a sight to bring 

a blush of shame I" the brow of every decent citi- 
zen ? 

Is there left to these police commissioners no 
ie of honor whatever? 

Do the} regard their oaths of office as an aggre- 

there no moral influence in this enlightened 
munity that may he brought to hear upon these 
men. no appeal that ma) he made to such remnant 
of their sense of honor as may remain, that will im- 
pel them to direct the chief of police to see to it that 
- law he enforced ? 

Will not fear of social ostracism, partial or com- 
plete, awaken them to the danger that confronts 
them; ( )r do they feel immune, realizing from the 
experience of the past that all danger of falling in 
ilar esteem is a myth — because people are so 
pn 'tie to forget ? 

Three weeks ago I received from one of my most 
intimate friends in my old home town in Indiana a 
letter inquiring particularly into the moral status 
of Los Angeles. He is thinking of removing to this 
city with his family, consisting of two sons, aged 
about seventeen and twenty respectively, and two 
daughters, one about fourteen and the other twenty- 
two. 

"How is the moral atmosphere in Los Angeles?" 
he wrote. "Do you think the environments would 
be any better for my children there than in this 
town? Is the city itself governed by clean, cour- 
ageous men? Do you think there is any prospect 
that a youth may become more hardened to vice, by 
reason of seeing it openly flaunted, there than here?" 

Now what sort of a reply do you suppose I could 
bring myself to address to this fond father of four 
splendid children? What word of encouragement 
could I write in reply to his last two questions? 
What reply would you make? 

Do you want to know what I did? I selected eight 
or ten newspaper accounts of the embryo cam- 
paign for the abolition of the "red-light" district, 
as you call it here, and sent them to him without 
comment. They speak for themselves. I will not 
deliberately lie to him, and I could not quite bring 
myself to "knock" Los Angeles because of its mis- 
fortune in being governed, temporarily, by a set of 
men who laugh at the element which is seeking to 
purify the city to a reasonable degree, and bow the 
knee, as befits "practical politicians", to the goddess 
of lust as exemplified in the institution at which 
young Woolwine has aimed his shafts. 

Your Liberal Alliance appears to have bulldozed 
the city authorities into keeping their hands off the 
advertising banners hoisted to the breeze in defiance 
of the law and the Board of Public Works, which, 
as T have been given to understand, is the munici- 
pal body which is supposed to govern the matter 
of street decoration and defacement. Two months 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 

Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

n > on imagine the future ol It 

irer ;i city "i a million pop 

I nan it «j- .s > ["hei stion 

of its co | ou dn ]'.a\ c the pi 

n the future you should 
own l; P iperty, Read I 

"Twenty-five i today the school board of 

1 "; Angeles city, having sold the old Spring Sti 

■1 lol <>n the corner of Spring and Second 
Streets (the present site of the Bryson Building), 
purchased a lot with uo feet fronting on Spring 
:el .ami an equal one on Broadway (then Fort 
Street) for $12,500. Mercantile Place now runs 
through lie property. The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages, The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is IOO 
times, or an avera.ee of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial, T.os Angeles Times, June 1. 1908. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 

all pure teas in their original 

'^^^^"^"nfr'*"'' state are "uncolored." THE 

NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 Cast Fifth St. 



The, Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 



W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Tel. E-1467 

Temporary Office, 181 1 Orange Street 



j 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



ago I would have been fairly stunned at the effront- 
ery of this organization in defying the constituted 
authorities ; but I have learned a few things regard- 
ing the manner in which pets of the present admin- 
istration are permitted to have pretty nearly their 
own way, and the banner episode now comes along 
as a matter of course. It is logically to be expected 
that, surrounded by the atmosphere of indifference 
which seems to permeate Los Angeles, it will be a 
matter of a relatively short time before I, too, look 
upon the present "system" of municipal administra- 
tion without blinking. 

It is this state of apparent indifference which, to 
me, is the greatest menace any city has to con- 
front. When the time arrives that such flagrant 
disregard of the regulations imposed — on paper — 
for the governance of a city is permitted with noth- 
ing more than a feeble protest, isn't it a sign of civic 
disease of some kind — a hardening of the civic con- 
science, a deadening, of the nerves which, under 
normal conditions, are supposed to sound the alarm 
that something is rotten in Denmark? Saloons open 
Sundays in defiance of the law, houses of infamy 
permitted to flourish under the very eyes of the 
authorities, a semi-political organization flaunting 
its political "pull" before the eyes of every citizen 
who travels the streets — all without emphatic pro- 
test on the part of the decent citizenship: are not 
these things indicative of the somnolence of the 
civic spirit which the inhabitants of this citv have 
come to believe they possess in a high degree? 

To an outsider, a relative stranger who is wit- 
nessing these things for the first time it certainly 
would appear so. 

Is this the sort of government which the city 
wishes to see bruited throughout the four corners 
of the country by disinterested people who, upon 
visiting the city for the first time, cannot fail to be 
impressed by the apparent lack of. popular disposi- 
tion to bring pressure upon these governing powers 
to compel them to see that the laws are obeyed? 

I wish somebodv who understands the local situa- 
tion better than I do would explain the whys and 
wherefores of all this to me. 

I trust that those who read this may not reach 
the conclusion that its most appropriate title would 
be "A Time-killer's Soliloquy", or that the writer 
is a Pharisee or a man of many caprices. I never 
have had such a reputation, although some of my 
friends back East have said that they believed I was 
born in Missouri — they say I want to "be' shown" 
altogether too much to suit some people. I don't 
believe it. All that I am after is satisfaction as to 
the justice and propriety of what appears to me to 
be popular indifference regarding the enforcement 
of laws which were made to be enforced and should 
be enforced. STIMULUS. 

* * * 

Try It 

How many of these words, in common daily use. 
can you pronounce correctly without consulting a 
dictionary? 

Pronunciation. Sagacious. Aristocrat. 

Lamentable. Isolate. Enervated. 

Despicable. Association. Languor. 

Precedence. Exhaust. Squalor. 

Excursion. New. Inveigle. 

Perfecting-. Humble. Obeisance. 

Decorous. Prelate. Sumptuous. 

Cement. Vicar. Betrothed. 



There Were Foxes 

An official of the New England Fox Hunting- 
Club wrote to the postmaster of Wellfleet, Mass., 
asking him if there were any foxes to be found in 
the neighborhood of the village. He received the 
following letter in reply : 

Wellfleet, Mass. 
4th of the 4th month '07. 
Friend Davis : — 

I am in receipt of thy letter of yesterday in which 
thee makes inquiries as -to the supply of wild foxes 
in this neighborhood and also the accommodation 
of strangers who would pursue them. I will say in 
reply that, while I esteem it a waste of energy and 
a dissipation cf material substance to engage in 
such frivolous business, in that the precious time 
could perhaps be better spent in works of charity 
or in holy meditation, not to mention that, the so- 
called game is at time put to great and cruel straits 
to elude the persistent dogs (on whose heads be 
curses), I am bound in all courtesy to say that I have 
discoursed with the proprietors of certain profane 
public houses here and have the assurance that at 
the time you mention, they can care for the club 
which you represent, which care would consist of 
clean, comfortable beds and abundant, wholesome 
food. They said nothing about drink, but without 
doubt coffee and tea would be provided; while such 
beverages are permissible, I trust associates will 
accept the evidence of an old man, that cold water, 
of which there is in Wellfleet an abundant supply 
of the best quality, is best qualified to maintain that 
clearness of vision and steadiness of nerve so essen- 
tial to successful fox-hunting. I beg to suggest that 
thee correspond with Friend E, as to terms, etc. So 
much for your comfort. 

As .to the sport, so-called, thee had better write to 

of this town, as his mind and body are much 

given to this and similar trains of thought and travel 
to (I say it with regret) the detriment of his busi- 
ness and I fear the peril of his immortal soul. 

I may say in truth I have heard discourse in cer- 
tain sinful circle that leads me to think that the 
foxes are plenty in this and adjoining towns and are 
very little hunted. 

Trusting I have covered the range cf thy in- 
quiries and that correspondence with the persons I 
have named will put thee in possession of all the 
information desired, and standing ready at all times 
to render any assistance possible, either in an official 
or personal capacity, I remain thv friend, 

'R.T.Nye. 
Postmaster, Wellfleet, Mass. 

He subsequently gave permission to print the 
foregoing letter in the note below: 

Wellfleet. Mass. 
7th of the 6th month '07. 
Friend Davis : — 

I am in receipt of thy letter of yesterday in which 
thee asks permission to print in the Worldly First- 
Day Press my letter to thee of early date in the 
fourth month. 

I will say in reply that, while it savoreth of en- 
couragement to vanity and worldly pride, if thee 
is well advised that the publication of the said letter 
will serve any useful purpose, thee has my permis- 
sion to use it in any way that seems to thee fitting. 
Verv truly thy friend 

R. J. Nye. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



Simplicity in Drv>s Impends 

If I were wealth nan who i~ n 

For her modes) though pei "my 

war ild abound i: which, th< 

I in every line, would be Huilt without a particle 
nf trimmi 

"I bel I she, "and 1 am guided in n 

lief by th< which I receive from Paris, that 

the day of the "perfectly plain gown, for dress occa- 
i- near a! hand. By fall we shall see 
the long, plain, tight-fitting reception robe; by mid- 
winter there will he the sheath, fitting the figure 
in every line and without a particle of trimming 
to mar its perfection; and then will come a long 

reiern of tight ^< >\vns. 

"'I have li okeil at French styles and T know that 
I am correct in predicting these long plain modes. 
As yel the urea: French designers do not dare to 

more than hint at them. But the movement is on 
the way. We are returning to the exquisite sim- 
plicity of a certain period in French dress when the 
woman bought handsome material and made it up 
with perfect plainness. They trusted to their own 
lines and to the perfection of their dressmakers to 
briny the gown out in ideal form. 

"The tendency of the handsome new gowns is to 
reveal every line of the figure. They are in perfect 
i and most of them are exquisitely graceful. But 
it is a fact that the draperies are so wound around 
the form that each line is brought out. This is an 
ideal condition for the woman with a good figure. 
In the hands of a skillful dressmaker it does not 
matter so much whether a woman's natural form is 
good or not. The modiste will take handsome ma- 
terial, drape it to perfection, and, behold, my lady 
will have a form, whether she had one in the be- 
ginning or not. 

"Mark my words," concluded this student of 
dress, "the woman who lives until winter will see 
the long plain lines of the French court in certain 
periods when there was little or no trimming. The 
velvets, the satins, and silks and the laces will be 
of the costliest and most intricate weaves and of 
designs that will excel in brilliancy. But the gowns 
will he long and plain and there will be the tendency 
toward the sheath dress." 

«5>6e "Correct" Woman 

She never gets disheveled or awry, like the rest 
of us. No matter how the wind blows or the seas 
rage, there she stands — immaculate, faultlessly mar- 
celled, appropriately gowned — not a lock out of 
place, not a fold of dress or coat beswitched or be- 
spattered, writes Kate Upson Clark in the Brooklyn 
Eagle. 

Who has not seen her return from an all-day ex- 
cursion in just this trim array? The rest of us, with 
hats blown askew, veils rent, shoulders dusty, tem- 
pers tried — she, smooth as glass all over her most 
tailorly tailor-made suit — her hat exactly on the 
middle of her head, her veil without a wrinkle, and 
so even that you are sure she must have had some 
secret way of measuring it when she put it on, and 
some occult system of keeping it so. She has on the 
same smile which she wore when she started — un- 
impaired, and with the turned-up corners just oc- 
cording to the directions for the Cupid's bow. in 
the beauty columns. 

You invite her to luncheon or dinner, and in ten 
days, there she is. making her proper call upon you. 



BUNGALOWS 

On installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We call put you up a home in almost any part of 
the city— from Boyle ll<inhts to die Westlake l>i~- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Hatvcy McCarthy, President 
C. C. Pattcrjon. Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 
I 
D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



PROPERTIES 



B 
U 

s 

N 

E 
S 
S 



■Qnberbtll Sbirt Co. 



MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom Shirts 



Phone F 6715 



4*144^ SovitK Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Street. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Frxiits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 

ROBERT nADISOIN, Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1562 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle 


{Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loans, Inveslm 
Insurance 


znts. 






GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

Real Estate 






Pho 


it F 146k 






902 Security BIdg., Los Angeles 


Col. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



You may have heard that she has sickness, in her 
family, that her servants have left her in the lurch, 
that she is in the midst of house-cleaning or even 
moving — but still, there she is — hat, veil, smile all 
in place. She makes no allusion to her own troubles. 
She is all concerned over your affairs. You learn of 
hers only thrugh the rumors which fly outside. 

You are invited to dinner at her house. The 
table is a highly polished mahogany — the doilies 
of exquisite drawn work. Under each plate is the 
proper asbestos mat which is never forgotten — as 
in your own imperfect establishment it is likely to 
be. The courses come and go like magic. The but- 
ler never has to be spoken to. The waiters or 
waitresses never spill, or forget, or fail to be on the 
spot on the instant. 

It is in the nature of the average woman to long 
for neatness, order, propriety — even convention- 
ality. Most of us — even the most faulty — really do 
struggle to attain unto the standards to her who is 
always comme il faut. 

This being so, why do we not oftener succeed? 
For it must be acknowledged that the thoroughly 
correct person is not often found. 

Well, one reason is because we are not clever 
enough. It takes a long head to plan everything so 
that it will come out right and to guard all the weak 
points. 

Secondly, even when we have the requisite 
amount of brains, we may not see the duty of con- 
ventionality so strongly that we set it first and fore- 
most — and unless it is set first and foremost, it can- 
not be kept up. 

Anyway, some of us have observed — and think 
over those correct persons whom you know, and 
see if this is not true of them also — that the correct 
person is seldom much of anything else. How can 
she be? especially if she is struggling- with the dis- 
advantages of a small income and an inadequate 
establishment. The time necessary to dress in this 
exact and immovable way — the time necessary to 
prepare and drill a household for any entertainment 
— the time necessary to make all those proper calls 
— why, when all has been said and done, there can- 
not be much time left for anything else. 

And there is one-thing certain: She who carries 
out all these details to perfection must have a cool- 
ness and deliberation which seldom go with a warm 
and sincere and loving heart. The correct person, 
say what you will, generally belongs to the kind 
which the poet has described as 

"Faultily faultless, icily regular, splendidly null." 

On the whole, most of us are a little afraid of the 
correct person, and we dare not be very intimate 
with her. 

There is a happy medium. We all want to look 
as well from morning to night as our limited re- 
sources will allow. We want to have our house- 
holds fragrant and orderly. We want to say and 
do all with tact. But to aim at too great exactness 
in all these details is likely to give us a faulty fault- 
lessness. Leave us, for heaven's sake, a little spon- 
taneity, a little of that loving thought for others, 
which means that you must sometimes forget your- 
self, a little more of the Mary, while neglecting the 
Martha. 

On the whole, we think we might love the cor- 
rect person better if she were not so maddeningly 
correct. It is wicked to wish that she might some- 
times get a spot on her dress, or lose a hairpin out of 
that exasperatingly pompadoured hair. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. NATHAN SON 

LADIES' TAILOR 
HABIT MAllER 

...HigHest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 
216 Mercantile Place 




We 

Pay 

Special 

Attention 

To 

Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 




li-.s Hazel Bell Rhode 
John Hoffman Schissler was celebrated at noon 
-.lav in Si. John's church by the rector, the Rev. 
Lewis G. Morris. The ceremony was followed by 
a wedding breakfast at the home of the bride's 
mother, Mrs. Siddle Bell Rhodes, cm Vermont ave- 
nue. The bride, who was given in marriage by her 
mother, was attended by Miss Carolyn Jane May, 
and the ushers were A. T. Thompson, W. W. Tyler 
ami S. F. Hammond. Mr. and Mrs. Schissler have 
Santa Barbara for a short stay, and will re- 
turn to Los Angeles for a visit of a week before 
leaving for Guanajuato, Mexico, where they will 
reside. 

One of the notable events of the week was the re- 
ception given at the Woman's clubhouse Tuesday 
afternoon by Mrs. R. It. Howell in honor of her 
daughter. Mrs. Mark Lewis. About three hundred 
guests were in attendance. In the receiving line 
with Mrs. Howell and Airs. Lewis were Mesdames 
Granville MacGowan, Z. D. Mathuss, Wesley Clark, 
Mathew M. Robertson. Waller Chanslor. John Peck. 
W. L. Graves, Stephen C. Hubbell, Carl Kurtz, 
Rufus L. Horton. Samuel S. Salisbury, I. N. Van 
Nuys, M. A. Briggs, Morris Albee and Misses Hub- 
bell. Bonnye Anderson and Byrd Chanslor. 

In St. Vincent's church Wednesday morning the 
wedding of Miss Agatha Sabichi. daughter of Mrs. 
M. W. Sabichi. and John J. Fay, Jr., was solemnized 
by Bishop Conaty. The bride was attended by her 
sister. Miss Beatrice Sabichi. Dr. George Sabichi 
was best man. The bride was given away by her 
cousin. Henry G. Wayne. A nuptial mass followed 
the ceremony. 

At the home of mother. Mrs. Rebecca W. Moore, 
No. 2628 Dalton avenue, Tuesday. Miss Ada Re- 
becca Moore was united in marriage with Frederick 
A, Batty of Santa Barbara. The ceremony was per- 
formed by Captain M. L. Lewis, chaplain in the 
United States Navy. The young couple will reside 
in Santa Barbara. 

At the home of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Mortimer 
Thompson on Echo Park avenue Tuesday evening 
their daughter. Miss Ethel Thompson, was united 
in marriage with Walter H. Chase, a young news- 
paper man of Long Beach. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. Baker P. Lee. 

Miss Agnes M. Stamps, daughter of Mrs. Edith 
M. Stamps of No. 718 West Second street, and 
Horace C. Chace, assistant superintendent of tele- 
graph of the Santa Fe. were married at noon Wed- 
nesday at St. Paul's Pro-Cathedral by the Rev. 
Henderson Judd. 

Mrs. John W. Thayer entertained at a musicale 
.Monday afternoon as a compliment to Miss Elsa 
Fuhrer, whose engagement to Frank Duquette was 
announced recently. Those who rendered the pro- 
gramme, which was of exceptional merit, were 



Bruce Gordon Kingsley, \li»- Bessie Bartlett, Miss 
Lucile Roberts, Miss Eula Howard of San Fran- 
cisco, the Misses Fuhrer, Miss Myrtle Oui 
Mrs. Philip Zobelein, Mrs. Edwin Robinson, Mrs. 
George Le Sage, Mrs. Fisher and the hostess. 

The engagement of Miss Nina Wood, daughter 
I r. and Mrs. Thomas Wood, and Eugene Wilson 

of TJhomasville, Ga., has been announced. The 
wedding will occur Tuesday. They will reside in 
the Imperial valley. 

Mrs. Walter S. Xewhall gave a dinner and dance 
Monday evening in honor of Miss Lucille Clark, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. \\ esle) Clark, and Stew- 
art ( ('Melveny, son of 11. W. O'Melveny. 

Mrs. M. M. Hinman and daughter. Miss Mar- 
guerite, of San Francisco, are guests of Mrs. Hin- 
man's mother, Mrs. J. M. Van Norman of West 
Thirty-seventh street. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Lawrence and their family 
have returned to California after an absence of 
eleven years in the East. They will make their new 
home in Hollywood. 

At the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Thomas 
McDougall, at Cliffton-by-the-Sea. Tuesday evening. 
Miss Priscilla McDougall was united in marriage 
with William B. Merwin. a well-known voting busi- 



<V^«*^/, 




'■&■■ 



So,Broadway V^^^^^t' So.Hili, Street 
A. PUSENOT CO. 

NEW DRESS GOODS 

Cream Mohairs 

50c to $2.00 a Yard 

We have a complete assortment of Cream Mohairs 
in both Brilliantines and Sicilians. Unusually de- 
sirable suitings for this climate — light, dust shed- 
ding and perfectly washable. Widths 30 to 50 inches. 

Cream Suitings 

75c to $3.00 a Yard 



We have just received a new assortment of Cream 
Tailor Suitings — fine Serges and Panamas, both 
plain and in self stripes. These fabrics are the very 
latest and newest ideas for late summer and early 
fall suits. Prices range from 75c to $3.00 a yard. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



ness man of Los Angeles and Pasadena. The bride 
was attended by her sister, Miss Mary McDougall, 
as maid of honor, and by Miss May Merwin, sister 
of the groom. Robert A. Rowan acted, as best man. 
Mr. and Mrs. Merwin will reside in Pasadena. 

Mrs. Myron Wells entertained with a luncheon 
last Saturday at Hotel Virginia, Long Beach, hav- 
ing as guests a number of friends from Los Angeles 
and Long Beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rufus H. Herron entertained re- 
cently with a dinner party complimentary to Sena- 
tor and Mrs. Frank P. Flint and Mrs. A. L. Dans- 
kin. 

Mrs. B. F. Boiler entertained last Saturday after- 
noon with a luncheon in honor of the eighty-second 
birthday anniversary of her mother, Mrs. Ella Phil- 
lips. 

Miss Grace Baldwin of Oakland is the guest of 
friends in Los Angeles. It is reported from Oak- 
land that she will be one of the September brides. 

The marriage of Miss Julia Theresa Eberlein, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Eberlein, and 
Thomas Mitchell Bridges will take place August 12. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Boothe and their family 
of South Pasadena are occupying- their cottage, 
"Sandhurst", at Terminal island for two months. 

The wedding of Miss Mary Widney, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Widney of West Jefferson 
street, and Sidney Reeve will occur in November. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester T. Hoag and their family,' 
of Hollywood, have returned from a month's outing 
in the mountains and at the seashore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Vincent of No. 1749 
West Twenty-fifth street have returned from a five 
months' tour of Europe. 

Mrs. E. Brodtbeck and daughter, Miss Adele 
Brodtbeck, have returned to their home, No. 3173 
Wilshire boulevard. 

The friends of General Harrison Gray Otis have 
learned with profound regret that he is in declining 
health. 

Miss Mary Cravens of this city is visiting her 
parents, Judge and Mrs. R. O. Cravens of Sacra- 
mento. 

Mrs. William May Garland will start in a few- 
days for an extended visit in the East. 

Mrs. Frances Thoroughman of this city leaves at 
the. end of this week for San Francisco. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Randolph H. Miner are at 
Coronado. 

* * * 
Io-wans "Will Rally- 
Much interest is shown in regard to the summer 
ouiting of former Iowans and their friends who are 
to gather at Long Beach Saturday, August- 8, and 
have a good time talking over the old days, meeting 
old friends and making new ones. Long Beach will 
put on her best dress and furnish good music. Each 
one wearing the new badge, which will be sold that 
day, will be entitled to coffee free of charge. Cups 
and saucers will be supplied. 



Plan to Visit 

Yosemite 
Valley 

This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, oi 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Pine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 



Phone F 5141 



Tenth and Main Sts. 



Much Truth in a Few Words 

— "It's not so much, HOW much you pay — 
— it's what you GET for what you pay." 
Furniture that you buy here is GOOD — the cost 
as low as anywhere. 

Ips j\n§eles furniture C°- 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH uid SEVENTH STREETS 

Furniture. Carpets. Rugs. Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



FOR 


SALE 


A No. 7 Blickensderfer Typewriter, 
in fine condition, almost new. Cost 
$50.00. :: :: :: 


$J5 Cash Gets It 


Call at Pacific 


; Outlook Office 






Pacific Outlook 



16 




"Aunt Mary" a Dear 

In the hands of ;t mediocre company Anne War 
ner's play, "The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary", 
which lias been seen and greatly enjoyed at the 
Mason this week, would hardly draw a hand-clap 
from a seasoned theater-goer: but as presented by 
the-company headed by May Robsorrthe play keeps 
in laughter or in tears almost from the begin- 
ning to the end. It is a hi mely thins;, the stor) of 
the reawakening of the spirit of youth in a cranky 
"old maid" — whose hardness of heart is only ap- 
parent, nol real. The theme is one which was 
worked to death in earlier years; but like many an- 
r simple story plainly told everything depends 
upon the manner of the telling. 

If one should read the story, rather than see it 
presented upon a stage, it would be regarded as dull 
and stupid enough. It is trite, commonplace — noth- 
ing, so far as the "rejuvenation" part of it is con- 
cerned, nmre than the oft-repeated tale of the lift- 
ing of the veil from the eyes of an unsophisticated 
country woman upon her "first visit in twenty-five 
years" to the city. 

May Robson is justly entitled to the rank she has 
reached as a delineator of character. She is a con- 
summate actress. There were moments during the 
first night of the week's production when the eyes 
of some of the most hardened theater-goers bore 
mute witness to her power. The sudden changes 
from screeching comedy to most pathetic scenes 
kept people alternately holding their sides and wip- 
ing their eyes. The laughter predominated largely, 
however. The humor is all wholesome, even the 
scene in which "Aunt Mary" discovers the loss of 
her purse and exhibits the better portion of her 
underclothing while endeavoring to reach a conclu- 
sion as to how the trick was done. Most players 
would have made of this a scene dangerously near 
vulgarity, but the most fastidious and "correct" per- 
son in tlie audience would not have thought of ac- 
cusing Miss Robson of a desire to offer anything 
suggestive. 

The "Lucinda" of Nina Saville, a prudish and 
severe old maid house-servant of Aunt Mary, who 
fails utterly in her endeavor to regulate the be- 
havior of her mistress; an3 Jack Story in the role of 
"John Watkins, Jr.", the young nephew whose 
pranks keep his aunt in a constant state of mental 
unrest and anxiety — these appeared to me to be the 
two best supporters of the star. Although her part 
calls for a brief appearance, Miss Grace I 'arks Fiske, 
as "Mrs. Daisy Mullins", a villager who depends 
upon the charity dispensed by "Aunt Mary" to 
make up for what her besotted and brutal husband 
fails to give her. does some exceedingly clever char- 
acter work. The remainder of the support is all 
that might be desired. 

The action is lively throughout the whole play. 



If there is any truth in the adage that laughter in- 
duce- obesity, 1 would advise those fearful of \\\- 

tsing their avoirdupois to keep awaj from "Aunt 
Mary". 



"The Christian" 

"The Christian" occupies the stage at the Bela co 

this week. It is a melodramatic piece with a pro- 
logue, and in four acts, dramatized by llall Caine 
from his novel of the same name. It suffers from 
the former popularity of the story, as so main >>i 
such attempts to put a hook behind the footlights 
do. The play seems patchy and is dramatic only in 
spots. Such emotions as it evolves are conventional 
when the\' are not false and absurd. It is greatly 
to the credit of the company under the direction of 
Mr. Bosworth that they were able to infuse as much 
apparent sincerity into the situations as they did. 
Hobart Bosworth as "John Storm", Harry Glaziei 
as "Lord Robert". Richard Vivian as "Drake" and 
Eleanor Carey as "Mrs. Callender" were particular- 
ly good. 

The prologue is rather dull and no one can won- 
der that John Storm and his sweetheart want to get 
away from home as soon as possible. The hero 
gives up the love of Glory Quayle too promptly, at 
her not over-urgent request, and abruptly decides to 
join a celibate brotherhood. But we are all prone 
to rapid vows in moments of stress, to cage our 
truant purposes. Promises and vows generally make 
more liars, cowards, Pharisees, and jail birds than 
self-respecting men. John Storm's vow makes of 
him a fanatic, whose temperament is much amelio- 
rated by the milk of human compassion, adulterated 
though it be by a just and histrionic wrath. 

Hobart Bosworth. garbed in the authoritative 
habilaments of a priest, does effective work in the 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 



The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless eood points that stamp 
it as n distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zbe Starr flMano (Lo. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



four acts which follow the prologue. John Storm 
gets himself into a mess for no very clear reason. 
The mob dance with him and then jeer at him. 
Their actions always receive running comment from 
a detestable archdeacon — a caricature part well 
taken by William Yerance. Glory Quayle goes to 
London and becomes a music-hall singer of no- 
toriety. John Storm goes to her rooms at night in 
order to kill her and thus save her from the seduc- 
tions of Drake, who is figured as an unscrupulous 
sensualist at one moment and the next as a retribu- 
tive Sunday school boy let loose on an innocent and 
long-suffering world. Drake covets Glory; he 
makes a manly stand against Lord Robert; imme- 
diately afterward he spies on Glory like a dish 
washer in company with Mephistopheles Robert, 
and in the last act he takes a noble attitude and says 
"God bless you my children'' when Glory and John 
Storm at last decide to do what they have wanted 
to do all along. The theme of the play seems to be 
the difficulty of loving anybody under sixty without 
"catching it'' on account of some human prejudice. 

Miss Jane Gray, who fills the role of Glory, re- 
tained in her voice some traces of the accent which 
was necessary in the Rose of the Rancho, and prob- 
ably for that reason her rendering of the part 
seemed somewhat affected. She appeared better in 
the first act than in the other scenes, and one could 
not help feeling that Glory would make a very poor 
parson's wife. Miss Grey made of Glory a senti- 
mental rather than a breezy sort of girl. Poor 
Glory wanted to sing in vaudeville and also to be a 
dear little wife. She lacked that steadfastness of 
purpose for which women are so notable. This 
characterization is, however, probably due more to 
the playwright than to the leading lady. "The 
Christian" is based on the safe insincerities of cus- 
tom — the easy-going scare heads of society which 
keep us from doing what we should like to do and 
which prevent us from liking anybody very much 
after we know their table manners. The melodious 
voice of Hobart Bosworth stood him in good stead 
in the emotional scenes. 

The play is well mounted and holds attention well 
enough without formulating a new catechism. 



"The Man from Mexico" 

"The Man from Mexico" is a well known farce 
which is not unfamiliar to Los Angeles theater- 
goers. It has been seen at the Burbank before. 
This week it has been presented in a lively manner, 
much success resulting from the skill of Harry 
Mestayer in the part of Benjamin Fitzhew, who 
goes to jail on Blackwell's Island for thirty days, 
making his wife believe, in the meantime, that he 
is in the city of Mexico. The resulting complica- 
tions and dialogue are amusing, a fact which the 
audience was not slow to appreciate. 

Harry Mestayer raised the play from farce to 
comedy in the second act and H. I. Ginn added to 
the fun of the piece in the role of Schmi'dt, while 
Robert Morris made an excellent sheriff — tough and 
masterful, a sort of brutality toying with reality, 
which was near enoug-h the truth to be sincere with- 
out being painful. The Spanish dancing of Blanche 
Hall received several encores. The play is bright 
and laughter-provoking, for which last purpose it 
has been successfully written and produced. 

DON. 




Is a California product — made especially for the 
housewife. It's a cleanser for the home and is 
adapted to use on 

Iron 

Steel 

Brass 

Copper 

Windows 

Woodwork 

and Porcelain Ware 

USE-IT 

TiTe AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE 1908 
MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bali-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typebar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse, — 'Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. &l M. ALEXANDER &l CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 



1 



Belasco Theater 

ompany, For the 
nl ;i complete 
Ity in the waj of a Frenchy, frothy and frolic- 
farce, quite apart from its usually serious 
fcrintrs. It is entitled "Julie Bon Bon" and \\a~ 
written by Clara Lipman, being used l>y that cele- 
ed farceur ami her equally well-known husband, 
.mi. as their starring vehicle in the East, 
h it lias never been seen in the \\ est. 
e play i- not naughty, but is full of fun. The 
Is with a French girl who is loved by an 
American of a rather staid and haughty family, and 
her father, a Franco-* ierman war veteran of bibulous 
tendencies, who tr-> the romance as a source 

of revenue. < >ne scene is laid in the fam. ins cafe 
called "Little Hungary" in New York, where the 
young man has been lured, but where Julie, in the 
exuberance of her feelings does a dainty dance on a 
table top, which lends to his disenchantment. 

The role of Julie affords Miss Jane Grey another 
brilliant opportunity for her talents, and as the 
saucy French girl, she should be pre-eminently sat- 
isfactory. The long cast tit- the mster of the Belas- 
co company perfectly, and a most amusing week is 
assured. Fred Belasco himself came down to mount 
and direct the production, and the effects, especially 
in the cafe with its brilliant assemblage in the full 
enjoyment of a typical New York night of festivity, 
are excellent. Following "Julie Bon Bon" Mr. 
Belasco will put on "The Wife", the greatest of the 
co- 1 leMille dramas. 

Most Versatile Actor 

Edwin Stevens, who scored an enormous success 
as the Devil in Mr. Henry W. Savage's trial pro- 
duction of "The Cloven Foot" at Hartford, Conn., 
last week, is an actor who started at the top of the 
ladder and stayed there. During a career of twenty- 
seven years on the American stage, Mr. Stevens 
never has played a small part and he is probably the 
most consistently successful player before the pub- 
lic today. 

About a quarter of a century ago Mr. Stevens 
combined a bank position in San Francisco with the 
profession of an oratorio singer. Miss Alice Oates, 
then one of the most popular prima donnas in 
America, visited San Francisco with her opera com- 
pany. Her leading baritone suddenly become ill 
and in seeking a substitute to sing the important 
role of Maurzooux in "Girofle-Girofla," Miss Oates 
found Mr. Stevens and engaged him. It was his 
first stage appearance and he scored so decided a 
success that he was signed for a term of years by 
the management of the Grand Opera House where 
he became leading man with the stock company 
playing that theater. One of his first hits was with 
"Nana Sahib." in which he played the role of the 
Colonel. 

At the close of the season Mr. Stevens returned 
to the bank as paying-teller and remained there un- 
til an attractive stage opportunity presented itself, 
when he went to Portland. Oregon, where he be- 
came manager of two theaters and owner of one. 
He not only managed his theaters, the Tivoli and 
Casino, but directed the productions at both houses 
and alternated between the two, as leading man. 

Mr. Stevens has played every sort of a part in 
every sort of a play and opera. His experience is 
unlimited and his career unique. By his physical 



characteristics he is peculiarly qualified to play ihc 

while his artistic tal- 
ents arc beyond questii n Mr. Savage expect- him 

ore a wonderful si ccess and believi 
Cloven Foot" will score dramatically as hi^ a 

i as was made in operatic circles by "The 
Merry \\ idow." 

♦ + + 
Once Paid For 

There are to be found many quaint chai 
among the roving bands of Irishmen who go over to 
England each year to help reap the harvest. < Ine 

of these laborer-. "Starlighl Mike." recently ob- 
tained from an English publican a drink of whiskey 
For nothing in the following way, lie entered a 

country inn and called for a glass of the best Irish 
whiskey. After being supplied he drank it and was 
about to walk out. when the landlord called him 
back. He said to him: "Mere, sir, you haven't paid 
for that whiskey you ordered." " That's that ye 
say?" said the Irishman. "I said you hadn't paid for 
that whiskey you ordered," replied the landlord. 
"Bedad, now, did ye pay for it?" asked the Irish- 
man. "( >f course 1 did," shouted the landlord, "lie 
jabers. then, if ye did," said "Starlight Mike." as he 
walked away, "phat the divil's the good of both of 
us paying for it ?" 

* * * 
W/>e Real Battle 

Voters must not forget that the real battle of the 
campaign in California is at the primaries Aug- 
ust 11.' 

August 11 will determine whether representa- 
tives of the people or representatives of the South- 
ern Pacific railroad shall be nominated for the legis- 
lature. 

August 11 will determine whether the P,oards of 
Supervisors throughout the state shall be the ser- 
vants of the people, or of the machine and the pub- 
lic utility corporations. 

Republicans must determine August 11 whether 
their party shall stand for government by the peo- 
ple or by the Southern Pacific railroad. 

If the machine nominates the ticket, there is noth- 
ing left for the voters to do but to go to the polls in 
November and ratify it. What the voters want to 
do is to nominate their, own ticket. That is the is- 
sue August 11. 



^ 



DuBois ®» Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West Sixth Street Los Angeles, Col. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets A r- p /^ f\ Q HP 
Drapenes /\ [ ^KJ O 1 

Lace Curtains 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE. SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring' St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Perez Field 

Persia is no easier country to travel in than Tur- 
key. To the European discomforts abound. In- 
vasions of unrest creep to bed, with the voyager. 
Flying dust and infection menace his food. No 
wonder, then, if mild enthusiasm is aroused by the 
opulent beauty and decay of the middle orient. W. 
P. Cresson has written a slight book of travel called 
"Persia: the Awakening East" (Lippincott), in 
which he describes a trip from Bagdad to Teheran. 
In the Persian capital he saw an ancient piece of 
ordnance of which he says : 

"This ancient weapon, known as the 'Pearl canr 
non' from the fact that a necklace of real pearls once 
decorated its grim muzzle, possesses the privilege 
of conferring 'bast' or sanctuary, and as long as 
criminals or debtors remain in its shadow they may 
claim immunity from pursuit. A miserable group 
of offenders is usually to be found camped about 
the steps of the brick platform on which the cannon 
rests, while officers of the law or relatives of the in- 
jured party wait patiently near until hunger shall 
drive them from the sacred precincts." 

Speaking of the influence which Russia has gained 
in Persia he says : 

"Although the legations of the other powers are 
all to be found in a quarter by themselves, — in the 
newest part of the town, — the Russian Minister oc- 
cupies a house in the native quarter near the bazars, 
where he keeps in constant touch with the centre of 
local activity. While America and England, the 
two greatest commercial powers of the world, con- 
cern themselves but little with advancing the pri- 
vate interests of their citizens, a merchant who 
trades under the flag of the Russian Empire finds 
in his Consul or Minister a powerful protector ready 
to assist him by every means at his command. The 
Russian-Persian Bank has its branches in every 
important town of Northern Persia, where all the 
advantages of credit and discount are open to Per- 
sian merchants, in their dealings with Russian sub- 
jects. And while the Persian customs were until 
recently nominally administered by Belgian offi- 
cials, it is notorious that since the whole financial 
situation in Persia passed under the control of the 
Russian holders of the last Persian loan, every re- 
vision in the scale of tariffs has been favorable to 
Russian trade, often in the face of the bitterest pro- 
test on the part of the other powers. Thus, so long 
as merchants of other countries are left by their 
representatives to shift for themselves in competi- 
tion with discriminating transport laws, and Rus- 
sian-built freight roads, there is little incentive for 
any but the most adventurous trader to enlarge the 
scope of his business operations in Northern Per- 
sia."- 



The suffragettes caused a serious brawl outside 
of the House of Commons early this month. The 
Academy comments thus on the affair: "In the 
Daily Mail we find three columns in the, most 
prominent part of the paper devoted to what it calls 
in its sweet halfpenny way 'The Siege of St. Steph- 
ens' . . . The older members of the Suffragette 
body . . . prudently kept in the background and 
allowed the crown of martyrdom to be bestowed 
on the more recent recruits, some admirable speci- 
mens of which they had procured either by money 



IMPERIAL 


VA LLEY 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 50 x 130 ft. lot!, $100. 




Loftus &l Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




Established 1889 



Phones Home Ex 531 
Main 7715 



TROY ■ 
LAUNDRY 

THE 

BEST 



Largest Steam Laundry in 
Southern California 



Troy Laundry 
Company 

Corner 14th and Main Streets 

Uptown Offices 123)4 W. 3rd. 
223 "W. 5th. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE = DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Jirtistic Designs 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7I6 " 7 Street 




r eeA 

akin' 

Company 

LosAntfeles 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



\ influence. < >m- of thesi delightful and no 
licately nurtured' ladies, >'ii being courte- 
ed bj a policeman to refrain from making 
a mi herself, replied b_\ spitting i;i his face 

and calling him 'a dirty cad'. We shall probabh 
be reproached and accus siring to revive "the 

barb • of the i>;i-t '. but we cannnt re- 

frain te Midi punishment as 

twelve strike^ of the birch rod seems to be tout 
indique in thi this bright specimen of 



Longmans lias recently brought out a life of 
Marshal Turenne in which the following anecdote 
Id, illustrating that general's almost Quixotic 
regard for his word : 

Driving home late one night, his carriage was 
by highwaymen. 'The robbers took every- 
thing of value that they could find on him, includ- 
ing a ring, which he highly prized quite apart from 
it- intrinsic worth. He promised the men that, if he 
might keep the ring, he would give them 100 Louis- 
d'ors. a sum far beyond its value, the next day. 
They returned the ring to him, and on the following 
afternoon one of them was bold enough to go to his 
house, and although it so happened that a number 
of people were visiting him, the man whispered his 
claim to Turenne. who ordered 100 Louis-d'ors to 
be paid to him, and. when the robber had had ample 
time tii get clear away, lie told the story of his ad- 
venture to his friends, saying. "A promise ought to 
be kept inviolably, and an honest man should never 
break his word, -even when it has been given to 
knaves." 

When, in the Revolution, the tombs at St. 'Denis 
were violated, and the bones of kings, queens and 
heroes were destroyed or scattered, the great mar- 
shal's body was preserved through an odd train of 
circumstances. The story is thus told: 

After it had been ordered to be thrown into the 
common tomb, two of the officers of the Museum 
of Natural History requested to have it, as being 
"a well-preserved mummy," which might be of ser- 
vice to the science of comparative anatomy. It was 
delivered to them accordingly, and carried to the 
Jardin des Plantes, where it lay for nine years in a 
storehouse between the skeletons of a monkey and 
a camel. In 1802, however, Napoleon heard of the 
circumstances, and had the body of the illustrious 
warrior removed to the Church of the Invalides, 
where it now reposes beside his own mortal re- 
mains. During the French Revolution his body, so 
little altered as to be recognizable from his por- 
traits, had been exposed in a glass case for the 
amusement of the populace. 



New Books at the Public Library 
*George Meredith: Novelist, Poet, Reformer, by 
M. Sturge Henderson (Methuen, 1907), is not only 
interesting as a study of the work of Meredith, but 
it formulates and discusses many problems which 
vex the spirit of modern men and women. The key- 
note of much of his teaching is sounded in the fol- 
lowing quotation : "Nature is not all dust, but a liv- 
ing portion of the spheres. In aspiration it is our 
error to despise her, forgetting that through Nature 
only can we ascend." This is from "Richard Fev- 
erel" written in 1859. It might well be taken as a 
motto for modern Pragmatism, and it only proves 
how far Meredith out-topped his generation. Mr. 




Exclusive 
Woman's Hatter 
French and EnglisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 



346 S. Broadway 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. y 


\ v^S) 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and J 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, , 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 1 




Scissors, Shears, Cutlery ", .* l , A ,\ A V4 J 1 /' 1 
Specialties and Novelties. "^s^mm^r* \ J* \j£ \ 


do it well. 




210 W. Third St. Los Angel*? 






Japanese and Oriental 



ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANT) EMB%OI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Ka^iuchi Bros. SZL 

533 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
Sth and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orler on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
$ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35.00 
12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 



100 Clippings 

250 

500 " 



20.00 10,000 



280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



Henderson is a delightful critic and has produced a 
book which merits the attention of readers who 
may not care for Meredith's stories, it is so stimulat- 
ing to thought. 

The number of new books this week is not great. 
Two books on Spain belonging to the Spanish series 
of J. Lane are The Escorial and Cordova, both pro- 
fusely illustrated and in convenient form. Painters 
and Sculptors, by Kenyon Cox (Duffield), is a series 
of essays on art, two of" them relating to modern 
men, Rodin and Lord Leighton. The Failure of the 
Higher Criticism, by Emil Reich (Cincinnati, 1905), 
is a protest against seeking spiritual light in dead 
formulae. The author concludes his book with the 
following sentence: "Higher Criticism stands con- 
demned by history fully as much as by true religion. 
It is neither true, nor helpful. It is the distortion 
of historic truth, as well as the desecration of true 
religion." The only book on science is What Is 
Electricity, by John Trowbridge (Appleton, 1903), 
belonging to the International Scientific series. 
Two novels by Anatole France will be greeted with 
pleasure by students of French. They are L'Orme 
du Mail and Le Mannequin d'Osier. 

We are pleased to note that half a dozen new 
*plays have been added to the shelves. Three are 
by Clyde Fitch : "The Stubbornness of Geraldine", 
"The Climbers" and "Her Own Way" — all pub- 
lished by Macmillan, and three plays by Henry Ar- 
thur Jones: "Joseph Entangled", "The Dancing 
Girl" and "The Middleman". Plays are often such 
good reading that it is singular that they are not 
more read than they are. "The Talking Woman" 
contains several monologues by May Isabel Pish 
(Harpers, 1907). 

*Books recommended.- 

* + * 
Apples and Insomnia 

A medical writer declares that the apple is such 
a common fruit that very few persons become fa- 
miliar with its medical properties. The best thing 
just before going to bed, he says, is to eat an apple. 
"Persons uninitiated in the mysteries of the fruit." 
he continues, "are likely to throw up their hands in 
horror at the visions of dyspepsia which such a sug- 
gestion may summon up, but no harm can come 
to a delicate system by the eating of a ripe and juicy 
apple before going to bed. The apple is excellent 
brain food, because it has more phosphoric acid in 
easily digestible shape than any other fruit. It ex- 
cites the action of the liver, promotes sound and 
healthy sleep and thoroughly disinfects the mouth. 
This is not all: the apple prevents indigestion and 
throat diseases." 

Stella — Can you dress within your income? Bella 
— Yes ; but it is like dressing within a berth in a 
sleeping-car. — Harper's Bazaar. 
+ * * 
Water 

Water, looked upon as the tamest of liquids, is 
as great an explosive as dynamite under certain con- 
ditions. In one day water breaks up more earth and 
rock than all the gunpowder, gun cotton and dyna- 
mite in the world do in a year. These explosives 
can be controlled by human agency, but water does 
not hold itself accountable to man.. It runs into the 
ground, freezes, expands and splits the soil into lit- 
tle pieces. Finding a crack in a huge rock it repeats 



the same process,- forcing it asunder. If frozen in 
the pores of a tree it often explodes with a report 
like a gunshot and the force of a dynamite bomb. — 
Popular Mechanics. 

* * * 

Pay for THeir Enthusiasm 

The spectators at wrestling matches in Japan pelt 
the winner with their hats. This is a custom with 
the Japanese for showing their appreciation of the 
skill of the winner. The hats are-gathered up by 
the attendants and handed to the champion. Event- 
ually the owners come forward and redeem their 
hats with presents of various kinds. The custom in 
question is, it is explained, due to a recognition of 
the fact that enthusiasm, is likely to cool down 
shortly after the event which excited it is passed. 
So, to prove the genuineness of his admiration, the 
Jap gives his hat as a pledge, to be redeemed in his' 
cooler moments. 

* * + 

A Jvimble of FigJ-ures 

A babu lawyer in India who recently defended a 
woman accused of assault and battery delivered 
himself as follows: "My learned friend with mere 
wind from a teapot, thinks to browbeat me from 
my legs. I only seek to place my bone of conten- 
tion clearly in your honor's eye. My learned friend 
vainly runs amuck upon the sheet anchors of my 
case. My poor client has been deprived of some of 
her valuable skin, the leather of her nose. Until 
the witness explains what became of my client's 
nose leather be cannot be allowed to raise a castle 
in the- air by beating upon a bush." 

4» 4» ■!• 

B>6c Roar and the Bray 

A little incident that occurred in San Francisco 
last week showed that the practice of law in that 
city is occasionally enlivened by repartee from the 
Bench. 

Sam Newburg, attorney for Abe Rue.f, in a pro- 
ceeding before Superior Judge Cabaniss, demanded 
to know why the Court had overruled him, while 
Mr. Heney "could insult the Appellate Court anv 
time he wanted to." Whereupon the Judge re- 
torted : 

"Mr. Newburg, there's as much difference .be- 
tween Mr. Heney and you as there is between a 
roaring Hon and a braying jackass." 

It is related that, following this remark, Newburg 
was silent for as much as three minutes. — Sacra- 
mento Bee. 

* * * 

Candor 

There can not be much satisfaction in "goin' 
around and lickin' the editor" when the latter not 
only makes copy out of the encounter but pictures 
himself as the hero as well. The following vivid 
pen-picture is taken from the editorial columns of 
an Iowa journal : "There was a blow. Somebody 
fell. We got up. Turning upon our antagonist, we 
succeeded in winding his arms around our wast, 
and by a quick manoeuvre threw him on top of us, 
bringing our back, at the same time, in contact with 
the solid bed of the printing-press. Then, inserting 
our nose between his teeth and cleverly entangling 
his hands in our hair, we had him !" 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Retarding Angela 

By t k 01 thk Gods 

Tli- human evolution is a third estati 

called by va ious names — her< 

demi >r intuitional. What we arc all try- 

ter this kingdom of insight and 

me wittingly, some on tin- tides o( 

and some grui owns 

■r spurred by the fear of anarchy and dis- 

homes. But as humanity is divided into 

•here are two ways of getting into 

this new condition. 'These lines of preferment are 

monly called male and female. They are both 

■.hey are and therefore necessary. 

What we have to do is to transmute our emotions 

into intuitions. — man by his intellect; women by 

hive: They are both striving for intelligence enough 

I oul of this moil of imperfection and of unpaid 

hill-, both laundry and celestial. 

neone has said that an intelligent woman is a 
prize package of the gods, rare and surprising. In- 
telligent men abound. They know wdiat they want. 
They seek paradise. They are prone to file through 
the pearly gates into the Elysian fields, marching 
with the precision of a chain-gang which tramps 
rhythmically to a bibulous turkey dinner. Men 
ht easily conquer the Third empire but for love, 
ly woman's love. They are retarded by wo- 
man's vision of his excellence — her appreciation of 
his solacing but temporary merits, his budding wis- 
dom, his florid altruism. 

It is not strange that women should be dazzled 
to a certain extent by the genial rectitude of men 
and vainly- yearn to enter a perfected state while 
they arc still somewhat unfit for wings, unmindful 
of their birthright of starry harmonies. The Coun- 
selor, with kind fatherly- intent, basing his advice on 
scientific, knowledge, would like to call the atten- 
tion of pretty women to the fact that the growth 
and expansion of bliss is delayed by their cloying 
though fully justified admiration of man. Every 
truth is ridiculous at first. If it is not ridiculous it 
is not likely to be true. You cannot divorce truth 
and humor. 

Amusing as it may appear, man might easily im- 
prove his condition. He bates to do this and out- 
strip his sweet duality. He is pre-eminently fair 
play r . Politeness is a choice of truths. Men's faults 
are selected compassions — well bred aids to the 
injurious. He deflects his virtue solely that women 
may learn vicariously of what terrestrial defects 
consist. This is kind of him. The more egregious 
his failings the better women know how to behave. 
It is love which makes man "peely-wally", an 
unstable hero bartering his wisdom for woman's 
praise. Woman's love is a twisted sign-board mis- 
guiding man. When all women love a syllogism 
as some men love sillibub, just think what will 
happen. Man's use of sillibub is aimed to show wo- 
men the value of a syllogism. Gaiety is a side pro- 
duct. If men were to skeddadle onward fancy how 
even fragile women would be forced to scamper 
after, lifting scraps of morality as in a potato race. 
It is not a pretty sight. Man therefore advances 
slowly, a complaisant teacher of woe. 

Dear Madames, love not men so much. Pauperize 
your hearts a little and shoo them on, reluctant 
though ye be to their improvement, retarding angels 
of an earthly Eden. 




-' -T ^ '-, I / M*«*it-S5?SwSw^ 




Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



€J Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50] 




Pacific Outlook 



A PAGE ©IF HUM©!! 



=0 Cr 




A Brief Introduction 

"Long introductions when a man has a speech to make 
are a hore," said former Senator John C. Spooner. "I 
have had all kinds, but the most satisfactory one in my 
career was that of a German mayor of a small town in 
my State, Wisconsin. 

"I was to make a political address* and the opera house 
was crowded. When it came time to begin, the mayor 
got up. 

" 'Mine friends,' he said, 'I haf asked been to introduce 
Senator Spooner, who is to make a speech, yes. Veil, I 
haf dit so, und he vill now do so.' " — Saturday Evening 
Post. 

* * * 

An Error 

A young man had been calling now and then on a young 
lady, when one night, as he sat in the parlor .waiting for 
her to come down, her mother entered the room instead 
and asked him in a very grave, stern way what his inten- 
tions were. 

H'e turned very red and was about to stammer some 
incoherent reply when suddenly the young lady called 
down from the head of the stairs: 

"Mama, mama, that is not the one." 



Via Air-ship 

Employer — "Did you tell Mr. Boreham, who called, 
that I had gone to New York?" 

New Office Boy — "Yes, sir; I told him you had started 
this morning." 

"Good. What did he say?" 

"He wished to know when you'd return, sir, and I told 
him I did not think you would be back until after lunch." 

* ♦ * 

Mid-air Peril 

' Mother Bird — "Run along and. play,' now; but be careful 
you don't get run over by any of those flying machinesi" — 
Metropolitan Magazine. 

* * * 

A Coward of Conscience 

Tired and dusty the excursion was returning from the 
Bank Holiday trip, and Simkins, a little bald man with big 
ears, overcome with his day of happiness, dropped off to 
sleep. In the hat-rack above, another passenger had de- 
posited a ferocious crab in a bucket, and when Simkins 
went to sleep the crab woke up, and finding things dull 
in the bucket,, started exploring. By careful navigation 
Mr. Crab reached the edge of the rack, but the next 
moment down it fell, alighting on Simkins's shoulder. Not 
feeling quite safe it grabbed the voluminous ear of Sim- 
kins to steady itself, and the passengers held their breath 
and waited for developments. But Simkins only shook 
his head slightly. 

"Let go, Eliza," he murmured. "I tell you that I have 
been at the office all the evening." — Philadelphia Record. 

* * * 

A Modern Critic 

Husband (after the theater) — ."Well, how do you like 
the piece?" 

Wife — "Very much. There's only one improbable thing 
in it. The second act- takes place two years after the first, 
and they have the same servant." 

* * * 

Took It Back 

A very devout Presbyterian clergyman in the Middle 
West had just married a' couple, and, as was his custom, 
offered a fervent prayer, invoking the divine blessing upon 
them. As they seemed to be worthy folk and not over- 
burdened with this world's goods, he prayed, among other 
things, for their material prosperity, and besought the 



Lord to greatly increase the man's business, laying much 
stress on this point. 

In filling out the blanks it became necessary to ask the 
man his business, and, to the minister'-! horror, he said, 
"I keep a .saloon." 

In telling the story to his wife afterward the clergyman 
said that as he wrote down the occupation, he whispered: 

"Lord, you needn't answer that prayer." — Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. 

* * * 

In Her Favor 

First Little Girl — "Your papa and mama are not real 
parents. They adopted you." 

Second Little Girl — "Well, that makes it all the more 
satisfactory. My parents picked me out, and yours had 
to take you just as you came." — Chicago News. 

* * * 

Congressional Gas 

Of the late Langdon Smith, the brilliant journalist and 
author of New York, a Denver reporter narrated anec- 
dotes the other day. 

"I remember," he said, "my first visit to Washington. 
Smith, big and handsome and vivacious, showed me about. 
From an eminence a great pale dome rose UP against the 
blue sky, the dome of the capitol. 

"'What is that?' said I. 

"'That?' siaid Smith. 'Oh, that's the national gas 
works.' " 

* * * 

Her Little Slip 

Departing Guest — "We've had a simply delightful time!" 
Hostess — "I'm so glad. At the same time I regret that 
the storm kept all of our best people away." 



Logically 

A thrifty Plattdeutsch couple moved to Toluca a few 
years ago and when one of the dry years made every 
nickel look as big as a dollar the good house frau insisted 
oh every conceivable economy which could be devised. 
Among other plans she thought also of saving on fcne 
chicken food. To this end she added sawdust to the bran 
which she habitually fed them. As the fowls, seemed to 
do well on this cheaper diet she gave them more and 
more sawdust and less and less bran. They continued 
to thrive until finally she fed them on sawdust alone. She 
set a hen and hatched, a brood of thirteen chicks, twelve 
of which had wooden legs and the thirteenth was a wood- 
pecker. 

* * * 

He Knew 

Sentimental Young Lady — "Ah, Professor! what would 
this old oak say if it could talk?" 

Professor — "It would say, 'I am an elm.'" 

* * * 

Business 

"Good morning!" said the claim agent cheerfully to the 
patient with a broken leg and head, in bandages. "I have 
good news for you. Yes., sir. The company feels sorry 
for you. It is willing to forgive and forget. Soulless? 
Why, man, it's all soul." 

"Ready to pay about five thousand?" 

"N-no, not exactly that. But I am authorized to sign 
its agreement not to prosecute you for letting yourself 
get thrown on the right-of-way and blocking rush traffic." 
— Philadelphia Ledger. 

+ + + 

Certain Sure 

"Only fools are certain, Tommy; wise men hesitate." 
"Are you sure, uncle?" 
"Yes, my boy, certain of it." 



BIISIIH; WDHJfrlNE. 



Jr Southwestern Weekly 



Gemrge 



Bmkvr Jtndermmn 

KOrron 



H. C. Jlckvrly 

PRESIDENT 



m ubli$hed evmry Saturday 
Ltitner Build ng, lot Jingelet. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S3, oo a year In advance. Single copy * 

centM on all neme mtanda. 

Entered u KcoRd-cliM miner April t, 1937, it the poilolfice it L01 Anjelet, 
Ciitformi. under the act of Congrru of March ), 1879. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pnclftc Oiitl.n.k In mulled to •niliorrllirr^ through the 
l.on \DErlfN Pout tun.-,- every Frldny, and nhould be de- 
ll vrrrd In every port of the elty by Snturdny'M pont. It lor 
■■T rennon It nhould he ricln>ed, or be delivered In poor 
condition. nubnrrlorrM will confer 11 favor upon the publisher* 
by Blvlns; them Immediate notice. 

Vol.5. Los Jfngeles, Cat., August 8, I908 Mo. 6 



* A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

* "Here will I hold. If there's a power above us 
:: (And that there is all nature cries aloud jt 
2 Thro' all her works) He must delight in virtue; S 
Q And that which He delights in must be happy." Q 

M — Addison's Cato. 



PARTICULAR NOTICE 
U/ye Pacific OutlooK's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial ; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or locai interest. 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
IS THERE ANYTHING which will outweigh 
self-respect? Is there any loss that a man can suf- 
fer which is greater than the loss of this one thing? 
Is there anything which he can possibly gain that 
will make up for this loss? Is the commendation or 

praise uf another as eloquent as the die- 
Respect tates of conscience? Can a man who is 
of Self false to himself be true to others? Does 

a hypocrite need to seek another judge of 
his character to satisfy himself of his honesty? Is 
there anything more degrading to self, in the eyes of 
self, than the daily interrogation mark placed after 
self? Is the man who deceives himself (but can 
a man deceive himself?) into the belief that he re- 



spects himself, when he has left a dishonorabli 
unatoned fur. satisfied with his conduct toward 

himself, is it not natural that he should harbor a SUS 
picion that another ma) be questioning him, even 
as he questions himself? Is an indictment brought 
by a guilty conscience not more convincing than 
one brought by a fellow-man? Is not the tempor- 
ary success of a wild and unhealthy ambition a 
foundation for supreme pity; and does not the ful- 
fillment of such an ambition, at the expense of an- 
other's happiness, necessitate the sacrifice of self- 
respect. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A GREAT VICTORY has been achieved for 
California by its great and good friend, counselor, 
guide, patron and overlord, Edward H. Harriman. 
In its stupidity poor misled California believed that 
its commercial fortunes would be enhanced by the 
construction of another line of railroad connecting 
it with the rest of the world. The fact that the 
building of this great highway of commerce would 
entail the expenditure of millions of dollars by one 
George J. Gould and his associates cut no figure 
whatever with ambitious California. Millions or 
no millions, it wanted — or thought it wanted — that 
railroad. Just as practically our en- 
The Great tire population had come to believe 
Awakening that the achievement of its desires in 
this direction was about to come to 
pass, the seat of the confidence of the state was 
rudely shaken. The people were roused to an un- 
derstanding that what they had sought so long was 
not best for them — that instead of needing another 
railroad they already were overburdened with trans- 
portation facilities. "Hence, my dear people," an- 
nounces our benefactor and patron, "I have taken a 
defensive measure in your behalf. I have 'fixed 
things' so that you need have no further fears of 
witnessing the (to me) painful spectacle of the en- 
trance of a rival into the transportation field of Cali- 
fornia. For helping you to achieve this great tri- 
umph rest assured that, in time, future generations 
in California will arise as a unit and call my name 

blessed." 

♦ * ♦ 

THUS IS CALIFORNIA rewarded for its po- 
litical bedfellowship with the interest represented by 
Harriman. Thus does it have impressed upon it 
the might and power of the man who has been con- 
trolling its destinies. This is bad enough, in itself; 
but to have the Harriman coup trumpeted by the 



Pacific Outlook 



chief California organ of the Southern Pacific as a 
"crowning- triumph" — this is "rubbing it in" with a 
vengance. A "crowning triumph" it certainly is — 
a triumph for that sort of trickery which- has made 
the name of Harriman and his California time-serv- 
ers infamous in the eyes of men who place love of 
their state above servility to a politics-corrupting 
railroad regime. There seems to be nothing left to 

be done toward remedying the la- 
Have the mentable condition imposed by 
Scales Fallen? Gould's discomfiture, but there is 

much that can be done to compel 
the institution controlled by Harriman to make 
partial restitution in the form of its just proportion 
of taxes due the state of California. To accomplish 
this all that is necessary is the election this year of 
a legislature which will enact the requisite laws, 
and the choice of a successor to Harriman's man 
Gillett as chief executive of the state. It were in- 
conceivable that the state should fail in this, after 
what has transpired within the past few days to 
open the eyes of the people to the utter hopeless- 
ness of expecting even so much as one fair turn at 
the hands of the ruthless Harriman and his insti- 
tution. Have the scales not yet fallen from the eyes 
of all the people? If not, what is necessary to give 
them a clear insight into the aspirations of this arch- 
enemy of the people? 

* + * 

THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY of Alameda 
county, Eyerett Brown, recently spoke from the 
pulpit of a church in Oakland on the subject of race- 
track gambling. "I do not maintain," he said, "that 
if the racetrack is closed all gambling will cease, 
any more than that if a murderer is hanged all 
murder will cease. But some murderers should be 
han.ged, and for the same reason the racetrack 
should be closed. At any police office you will find 
iiT seventy five per cent of the telegrams received de- 
scribing fugitives from justice, this sentence: 'He 
frequents racetracks, and can be found there.' We 
read of cases all the time of trusted employes em- 
bezzling funds from their employers to play on the 

races, or of fathers being called up- 

The State's up to make up defalcations of their 

Responsibility sons due to the same cause. I was 

called upon a short time ago to 
prosecute the case of People vs. McCort, charged 
with forging a check for $250 to play the races. He 
was such a young and clean looking lad that I wrote 
to his father to see if the check could be made good. 
The answer I received told of theft after theft made 
up ever since the lad was sixteen, and finally saying 
that the boy must take his chances this time. I 
thought at the time of our statute books singling out 
these crimes and punishing them, while they look 
with benign countenance upon the racetrack evil 
which brings these boys before the court. The 
state, not the individual, is at fault for the commis- 
sion of these crimes." 



"RACE TRACK GAMBLING is a short road to 
wealth that never gets there," he continued. "Men 
play a little money, see big gains ahead, neglect 
their business, lose their money and soon are ruined. 
Section 330 of the penal code prohibits a long list of 
gambling games, fan-tan, poker, etc., but is silent 
on the subject of selling pools at races, its very 
silence giving- consent. Three-fourths of the people 
of this state are opposed to this form of vice, and if 
they will express their opinion at the polls it cannot 
endure. It is more important to elect a legislature 
this fall who will vote right on the racetrack ques- 
tion, than it is to elect a man who will vote 
Hidden for the right man for United States sena- 
Rocks tor, for the former touches the home and 
fireside, debauching our young men, the 
bulwark of the nation. We do not want to abolish 
horse racing or to check the fame of the California 
horse, but merely to abolish the sellig of pools on 
races. If this will kill racing, then let it go, for our 
penitentiaries are full enough now. The federal 
government is spending millions to blast out the'hid- 
den rocks at the entrance to our great harbors, to 
prevent shipwrecks. Let us try to blast away the 
hidden dangers that are wrecking the lives of our 
young men. It is not even gambling at Emeryville, 
for there is no chance to win in the long run. The 
men on the inside out there never play the game. 
They let it severely alone." 
* * * 
NO, THE MEN "on the inside" never play the 
game. They know what it means. For a' kindred 
reason the man who sells liquid damnation over a 
bar seldom drinks it himself. The average bar- 
keeper is a temperate man, frequently a total ab- 
stainer. The men "on the inside" among the race- 
track gambling fraternity are, similarly, total ab- 
stainers, as a rule. Both know the character of the 
stuff they are offering to others and wisely leave it 
alone themselves. As eminent authorities on the 
quality of vice which develops from the desire to 
win "easy money" on the racetrack, by their refusal 
to engage in the "game" they 
Are You for make possible for others they prac- 
Its Protection? tically shout aloud a warning to 
others to beware. The political 
organization which has controlled California for 
more than a generation takes a different view, how- 
ever. It declares that this species of gambling shall 
be protected so long as it remains on guard. 
Whether it shall be permitted to license this kind of 
vice in the future depends entirely upon the voters 
of California. If every man who believes that the 
time for the abolition of racetrack gambling has 
arrived does his duty, he will go to the primaries 
August 11 and, by supporting the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
Republican League, which has emphatically de- 
clared against the continuance of this form of vice, 
take a hand in the act of ringing the death-knell of 
the debauching institution called the bookmaker. 



Pacific Outlook 



IT WAS EDIFYING I ■ read the remarks 

the 

the term 
irganization" for the pui dentifica- 

.1 the proposition he submitted 
ntlemen who gathered about the festive 
ain English, took this 
form: "The Lincoln-Roosevelt Re- 
Mr. Flint's publican 1 trying to disrupt 

Accusation the Republican party." By this he 
means, we presume, that in pro 
irk for the election t.. the senate of a suc- 
■r to that office who will not l»e Mr. Flint, the 
teir the party into shreds and 
riing them to the breezes. The charge is one 
titled to investigation. If there can be found on< 
iota of truth in it. then let the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
Republican League go the way of all organizations 
and institutions whose cornerstone is perfidy. 
+ + + 
WE RECALL that four years ago Thomas R. 
was the incumbent of the position now oc- 
cupied by Mr. Flint. But we fail to recall that any 
charges of attempting to disrupt the party were 
made against Mr. Flint and 1 ^ i — ■ associates, Mr. Her- 
rin and the latter's able lieutenants, when the move- 
ment for the unseating of Senator Bard was under- 
taken. Mr. Herrin, a Democrat, took possession 
of the partv in behalf of the Southern Pacific poli- 
tical bureau, but we do not recall that anybody was 
sagacious enough at the time — it was long ago — to 
enter the charge that this Democrat was seeking 
(0 disrupt the party. The Honorable Abraham 
Ruef, the Republican-for-revenue 
And a Little right hand of the Democratic pro- 
Tit for Tat prietor of the Republican party, 
having secured a deed to the party, 
sold it for the bagatelle of $14,000, without disrupt- 
ing it to the slightest extent. It has remained whole 
up to the present time, although sadly frayed around 
the edges. We don't believe the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
bosses, numbering many thousands of Republican 
voters, intend to do any disrupting. What they 
seem to be after is to procure for the rank and file 
of Republican voters an unclouded title to that 
which is now occupied by squatters. The party, un- 
disrupted in the most approved fashion, is about to 
fall, a splendid legacy, into the hands of its lawful 
heirs ; but these do not include the Hen-ins and the 
Ruefs and the Hattons and the Parkers, nor any 
of their hired men. 

* * * 
JUST SO LONG as the Southern Pacific politi- 
cal bureau dictates the appointment of federal 
prosecuting officials in California there will be small 
hope, judging by the experiences of the past, for 
the correction of the abuses incident to the con- 
tinued and flagrant violation of the alien labor laws. 
Several months ago the Pacific Outlook directed 



the attention of til lUthorities in Los An- 

io the manner in which this law was being 
persistently am specifying the 

of the contractors supplying labor to the Los An- 

Pacific railroad. The other day the Herald 
revived the subject in the following editorial: "Con- 
tract laborers are being brought from Mexico to 
do track work for the Southern Pacific railroad 
El Paso to San Francisco. Mem- 
Labor Law hers of the linn of I.. II. Manning & 
Violations I ipenly they have a 

con: ract with the Southern Pacific 
to furnish labor. Are there not enough able-bodied 
white men in the United States to do the Southern 
Pacific railroad's work? Certainly there are, and 
the Manning linn or any other could find them if 
it took tin- trouble to look for them. Put contract 
Mexican labor is cheaper than free American labor. 
That is the true explanation of the conduct of the 
Southern Pacific railroad. At a time when white 
men are out of work, to bring cheap labor into the 
United States is not merely a violation of the alien 
labor law, but is treason to the workingmen of 

America." 

+ * + 

WE BELIEVE the Herald displays poor judg- 
ment in entering upon a review of the case from an 
ethical standpoint. To attempt to influence a greedy 
corporation like the Southern Pacific Company by 
moral suasion is the most supreme folly. Water 
poured upon the back of a duck will have as much 
effect upon the bird as moral suasion influences will 
have upon a great railroad corporation which seeks 
to defy the law. An institution which wipes its 
feet with glee upon so sacred a document as the 
Constitution of California may be depended upon 
to sweep with a withering glance of 
The Way disdain so innocuous a thing as a fed- 
to Proceed eral statute — innocuous, at least, 
while the power of making and un- 
making federal officials remains a prerogative of 
this corporation. If the Herald and the other free 
newspapers of California earnestly desire to do 
something for American labor, let them abandon 
all thought of attaining that end by invoking ethical 
considerations. Let them represent the facts in the 
case to the federal department of justice, with a de- 
mand that that department investigate the subject 
and take such action as conditions warrant. Con- 
certed and determined action in this direction may 
produce results. An appeal to the conscience of a 
railroad corporation or one of its allies never will. 
♦ ♦ •♦ 
WE XOTE with fee'ings of gratification that 
Mayor Harper has determined to take a step toward 
reform in the administration of the affairs of the 
city. If properly quoted in the Express the mayor 
is about to put his detractors to shame. For some 
time the city has been about as thoroughly agi- 
tated as it dares to become during the warm weath- 



Pacific Outlook 



er over the subject of reported ownership of houses 
of prostitution by those more or less intimately 
identified with public affairs. This the mayor prom- 
ises, in a vague sort of way, to in- 
Important vestigate. What he will do if he 
Pronouncement finds that the charges made by the 
Herald are true may be left to the 
imagination. But he will investigate. But, above 
and beyond this trivial matter, there is the subject 
of the dog-catching system. And on this vital mat- 
ter, whose paramountcy is instantly apparent to 
all intelligent, discerning men, the mayor speaks in 
no equivocal terms. Long after his uncomfortable 
chair shall have become occupied by another, per- 
haps by one less worthy, this strong and manly ut- 
terance of the mayor will ring in 'the ears of the 
executive-baiters, and may it confound them : "I 
think we will have to make some changes in the 
dog-catching system." 

* * * 

LOS ANGELES will never take rank among the 
prosperous manfacturing cities of the country until 
its inhabitants themselves show their confidence in 
the manufacturers who have established industries 
here by demanding that the merchants shall keep 
the local output in the retail market, along with the 
product of foreign manufactories. We are inclined 
to the belief, after a little investigating, that many a 
local manufacturing industry is proving unsuccess- 
ful because of the indisposition of local retailers to 
endeavor to popularize the home product. We have ' 
in mind particularly two products of great utility 
the manufacture of which has been undertaken re- 
cently in this city. Though meritorious to a high 
degree, the equal if not the superior of numerous 
other commodities of like nature manufactured else- 
where, the makers have found it almost impossible 

to. secure a local market, partly 

Encourage Home by reason of the fact that the 

Manufacturers foreign-made articles come to 

California bearing credentials 
manufactured by printer's ink, and partly by 
reason of the manifest unwillingness of some local 
retailers to "try out" products bearing a Los An- 
geles stamp. This is not a hard and fast rule, of 
course ; but it is evident that the average merchant 
is quite indisposed to attempt to push a home-made 
article in the face of the rivalry between it and the 
article made in another state' or country. If the 
local consumers would ask their retailers for the 
home product it would not be long before the suc- 
cess of many a home industry of a now dubious 
character would be assured. Furthermore such a 
course would encourage other manufacturers to es- 
tablish themselves in business here — and we are all 
ready to admit that one of the greatest needs of Los 
Angeles is an abundance of successful manufactur- 
ing enterprises. There is no better way to en- 
courage such as these than by asking for their pro- 
ducts. 



ANNOUNCEMENT is made that the district 
attorneys of California are to organize, to enter 
into "a sort of offensive and defensive alliance." 
The step is a wise one. The prosecutors of the 
various counties are taking a step that indicates 
sanity and prudence on their part. That they 
should ally themselves for purposes of defense 
proves their discretion. There are among these 
officials, according to common report, some who 
are constantly on the defensive, who have won re- 
putations as expert explainers of their attitude on 
certain questions vitally affecting the public wel- 
fare. For example, we have in mind 

On the a district attorney who has demon- 
Defensive? strated so high a regard for the wel- 
fare of the "regular organization" of 
the party which elevated him to office that he hesi- 
tates long, even indefinitely, before he will permit 
his office to take any legal steps in behalf of the 
people, whose paid attorney he is, at the expense 
of those whose friendship and support is deemed 
an essential to the political success of this organiza- 
tion. Presuming that there are other district at- 
torneys similarly handicapped, it is hardly to be 
wondered at that they seek to organize for their de- 
fense. Another view: Isn't it passing strange, 
that the sworn officers of the law should find it 
necessary or wise to organize for the sake of de- 
fending themselves? Defense against what? We 
still wonder. 

+ * * 

IN SAN FRANCISCO the other day three men 
were arrested for laying bets on a baseball game. 
The action was taken at the instance of Cal Ewing, 
president of the Pacific Coast Baseball League, who 
had observed that certain racetrack bookmakers 
were invading the baseball grounds. He determined 
to put a stop to the evil before it had gained a foot- 
hold, and the only way that appeared to him to ac- 
complish the result sought was the apprehension 
of the "bookies". Good for Cal Ewing ! In com- 
mon with Americans generally he recognizes the 
fact that the only way to keep baseball from travel- 
ling the path followed by horse racing is- to nip the 
baseball gambling spirit in its incipiency. Baseball 
is the one great sport which has re- 
Baseball mained, thus far, uncontaminated by 
Threatened the operations of the professional 
gambler. To give the fraternity an 
inch means inevitably that it will take an ell ; and 
then — farewell to honest baseball, to clean base- 
ball. The money men pay to witness baseball sup- 
ports "the game. The gate receipts at horse races 
do not support that game; but they would if the 
sport could be purified and lovers of the horse could 
be assured that the racing were to be "on the 
square", not bought or sold according to the wishes 
of the men back of the bookmakers. The moment 
that professional gamblers are permitted to infest 
the diamond the death knell of honest sport of this 






Pacific Outlook 



kin<! will have been sounded. Therefore every lover 

ill should encourage Cal Ewing and every 

seball mai undertakes to tight the 

reduce this game to the level of 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THIS YOUNG Mr. Woolwine, the city pr 

presumptuous young man. We had 
supposed liim to be a gentleman. We had thought 
him to be wellbred enough to refrain from address- 

• in a familiar manner, and most par- 
ticularly to hesitate long and hard before going to 
the length of making a demand upon one to whom 
he was entirely unkn iwn. But here he has been 
writing letters to the mayor and the police commis- 
wigclcs. actually demanding that they 
take some steps, in fulfilment of their oaths of 
office, toward the enforcement of cer- 
We Must tain laws, which he specifies. We are 
Apologize truly sorry that this young, and prob- 
ably utterly unsophisticated, public 
official should have overstepped the bounds of com- 
mon courtesy so far as to address the sacred person 
ir august executive without first having taken 
the precaution to secure a formal intioduction. This 
is outrageous. — (P. S. Mr. Woolwine has explained 
that he did not address Mr. Harper, after all. He 
simply wrote a letter to the mayor and the police 
commission. Mr. Harper did not happen to be 
may - Angeles at the time when the letter 

was written. Mr. Pease was mayor. We tender a 
profound and heartfelt apology to Mr. Woolwine. 
He is all wool, in spite of the fact that his name is 
alloyed I. 

* * * 

IT PAYS to "stick to it". The remarkable 
achievement of Count Zeppelin, the noted German 
experimenter in aeronautics, may be cited in proof 
of the adage. "All things come to him who waits." 
If the newspaper reports of Count Zeppelin's re- 
cent flight through the air are truthful — and they 
doubtless are. this German scientist has practically 
solved the problem of the navigation of the air. Ex- 
cepting a slight faux pas, the airship was completely 
under the control of its navigator and his crew. For 
a time so great a speed as forty miles per hour is 
reported to have been attained. A correspondent 

of the Associated Press followed the 
Reward of airship in a fast automobile, but found 
Persistence it almost impossible to keep up the 

pace set by the Hying monster. 
When we remember that but three-quarters of a 
century ago the most enthusiastic believers in the 
application of steam power to locomotion predicted 
that it might be possible, sometime, to drive a 
locomotive at the rate of fifteen miles per hour, 
but that this speed was the limit attainable, in their 
belief, who shall have the hardihood to deny the 
probability that within relatively few years the air 



will be n 

old and wain are now navigated: Counl 
Zeppelin has proved that aerial trai „ is 

possible. All that now remains is to perfect the in- 
vention which during this week has fairly astoui 
civilization, 

+ * + 

A FEW WEEKS \GO we referred in these 
unms to the great menace to human life found in 
the presence in tile home of the common house fly, 
Since then we have found numerous articles touch- 
ing upon the same question, Scientists have reached 
igreemenl to the end that this pes) is a distinct 
danger to life. The New York state entomologist, 
u ho has been devoting some time to the study of the 
insect and its ravage-, has deemed ii of sufficient 
importance to issue a special warning, to this ef 
feet: "Dwellings with hundreds of house-llies are 
hardly sanitary while buildings devoted to traffic in 
comestibles and swarming with Mies, are not only 
unsanitary but a menace to public health. Recent 
studies have shown a close parallel, in large cities, 
between the abundance of flies and the frightful 

mortality among infants during the heated 

The term. The deadly typhoid fever will soon 

Fly demand its heavy annual tribute in both life 

and strength. The common, apparently harm- 
less house-fly is known as a carrier of the intestinal 
germs so deadly to both infants and adults, yet its 
baneful potentialities are ignored for the most part. 
Nothing but criminal indifference or inexcusable ig- 
norance is responsible for the swarms of flies so 
prevalent in many public places. A general insist- 
ence on the part of purchasers, that all foods and 
drinks be kept free from danger of infection by this 
insect, would soon render unprofitable the stores 
and other places of traffic where the house-fly is al- 
lowed to swarm unchecked." Acting upon the pre- 
sumption that the California fly is as dangerous an 
insect as the New York pest, does it not behoove 
us to attack the problem with an eye single to his 
elimination ? 

* * * 

AT THE AGE of eighty a man was told that he 
had but one more year of life, "ff that is true," he 
said, "I will have to work very hard. I have just 
commenced the study of the Hebrew tongue, and 
it will require every day of the remaining vear to 
master it." What a rebuke to those who waste time 
and opportunity! Of all the gifts with which we have 
been endowed, opportunity to perform useful labor 
is the greatest. Every hour of the day brings with 
it opportunity to accomplish something. If we 
spurn the gift, we lose that which will 
Time's never be offered again, for that particular 
Value hour is gone forever. It makes no dif- 
ference whether you happen to be twen- 
ty or eighty — time may be made equally valuable in 
either case. Age is not a measure of vears : it is a 



8 



Pacific Outlook 



condition of head, and heart, and hand — which, af- 
ter all, means that it is a condition of mind. The 
mind which continues active when its possessor has 
attained the age of eighty is, in reality, younger 
than the mind of the blase and indifferent man of 
thirty. Stop to realize one thing, that the only 
chance we really see and hold in this life is the 
chance that presents itself today, even at this very 
moment, and you will grasp the offering and strive 
to make the most of it. 

* * + 
"Ingratitude" — in Epigram 

By Whijam Gborgs Jordan 

Forgetfulness of the heart. 

Inability to forgive those who have done us a 
kindness. 

Some one's confession that we are no longer 
necessary to him. 

Revenge for past favors. 

Repudiating the soul's debts of honor. 

Stabbing the hand that has fed us. 

Treason usurping the place of thankfulness. 

Accepting friendship's dividends, but refusing to 
pay its assessments. 

The cowardice of the deserter in the hour of a 
benefactor's need. 

The devil's highway from thoughtless thankless- 
ness to treachery. 

American SilK a Possibility 

At the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific exposition in Seattle 
next year there will be a novel exhibit from Japan — 
a complete silk producing outfit. There will be mul- 
berry trees in large quantities, and the public will 
be enabled to watch the entire process of silk manu- 
facture from the time the worms wrap themselves 
in their cocoons to the weaving of the thread into 
fabric. ' Every single step will take place in full 
view of the spectator. The exhibit will be so ar- 
ranged that there will always be cocoons ready for 
unwinding, and constant demonstration will be giv- 
en of the methods of the silk weakers. Seattle is 
much pleased with the plan, and has high hopes that 
the exhibit will lead to the establishment of the silk 
making industry in Washington, the climate being 
said to favor the production of mulberry trees and 
silkworms. 

* * * 

Some are "SticKers" 

How many of these words in common use can 

you pronounce correctly without referring to a dic- 
tionary? 

Monologue. Communism. Maniacal. 

Disheveled. Judiciary. Laundry. 

Exquisite. Finance. Irreparable. 

Stratum. Especially. Cognizance. 

Appreciation. Envelope". Stationary. 

Exact. Economical. Stationery. 

Lever. Introduce. Salient. 

Observatory. Derogatory. Casuistry. 

Conscientious. Filial" Incomoa'rable. 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 
Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

Can you imagine the future of Los Angeles? It 
is today 300,000 nearer a city of a million popula- 
tion than it was 25 years ago. There is no question 
of its continuous growth. If you do have the power 
of imagination to look into the future you should 
own Business Property. Read this: 

"Twenty-five years ago today the school board of 
Los Angeles city, having sold the old Spring Street 
school lot on the corner of Spring and Second 
Streets (the present site of the Bryson Building), 
purchased a lot with. 120 feet fronting on Spring 
Street and an equal one on Broadway (then Fort 
Street) for $12,500. Mercantile Place now runs 
through the property. The property is at the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in the two 
frontages. The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is 100 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
century or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial, Los Angeles Times, June I, 1908. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will, be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 
W. H. JtMKINb, Mgr., f tms ,o IArJ Office, 1S1 1 Orange Street 



^ 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



Pacific Outlook 




A Newcomer from Indiana TaKes Exceptions to Some Thing's 
He Has Seen and Heard in Los Angeles 



III 




I' IS REALLYtoo bad that there is so mum 
■backbiting and thunder-stealing going on 
Mute. 1 have been intensely amusi 
J era I recent evidences of a spirit that savors 
Jot' almost anything except fair play and the 
square deal. Among politicians this may be taken 

i course, here as elsewhere: but it does 
seem to be confined to politicians. 

I have an acquaintance hark in Indiana who oc- 
cupies a seat on the bench. His name is Artman. 
A year or so since I picked up my copy of the Syca- 
more one morning and read that he had handed 
down an opinion to the effect that no law permitting 
the sale of intoxicating liquor was constitutional. 
About the same time Dr. Chapman, the head of the 
Anti-Saloon League in this part of the state, was 
credited with the statement that some branch of the 
league he represents had been responsible for bring- 
ing this particular Indiana case before the court. 
Soon afterward Dr. Chapman and a gentleman 
named Wheeler, an ardent champion of the cause 
of total prohibition, engaged in a controversy, I am 
informed, as to whether the responsibility for bring- 
ing this case into court should properly rest upon 
the shoulders of the Anti-Saloon League or the 
prohibition party. This has nothing particular to 
do with what I started out to say, except as explain- 
ing why my attention was recently attracted once 
more to Dr. Chapman. 

I read in a daily paper the other day: "The super- 
intendent of the state Anti-Saloon League, Dr. E. S. 
Chapman, yesterday announced his intention of tak- 
ing the field against the race tracks. Dr. Chapman 
says he will endeavor to have every candidate for 
the legislature declare himself in plain terms before 
election day." 

If it be true that Dr. Chapman really endeavored 
to "steal the thunder" of the prohibition party a 
year ago. as has been charged, it appears to me to 
lend some slight color to the belief that he may be 
trying to don the anti-racetrack gambling campaign 
clothing of the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican 
League, which, according to my information, is 
the original anti-racetrack gambling organization, 
or the clothing of the organization at Berkeley, 
which long ago began a campaign against the gam- 
blers. At any rate Dr. Chapman seems to have de- 
veloped a penchant for getting into a fray at the 
psychological moment and harnessing the thunder 
as it reverberates from one side of the public brain 
to the other. He may be aged, as the world reckons 
age, but his mind must be as fresh and green as a 
bunch of April alfalfa in California. The younger 
element among the politicians would do well to 
profit by the example he furnishes in his ability to 
take advantage of the latest and most approved de- 
vices for corraling the line of popular vision. 

I understand that the Lincoln-Roosevelt Repub- 
lican League has decided to make no contest for 
representative in Congress from this district. If 



i his be true, this will leave the field open to the ma- 
chine candidate. Mr. Mel .achlan. One of the in 
iluential member? of the league told me the other 

day that a consensus of opinion among the g I 

government forces was to the effect that it was un- 
wise to precipitate a light on representative in a 
presidential year, the general feeling being that if 
any strong sentiment adverse to the return of Mc- 
Lachlan should develop it would hurt the cause of 
Taft. I don't believe it — but I don't know Califor- 
nians very well yet and perhaps my informant is 
right. 

McLachlan, he says, is a "negative quality". I 
presume he means that the present representative 
does nothing, which may be considered as better 
than trying to do the wrong thing. I wonder why 
the Democrats don't unite on a good strong man 
who will draw from the Republican vote — such a 
man as Thomas E. Gibbon, for instance, who, I un- 
derstand, though a professed Democrat is of the 
broad type. The Democracy is said to be very 
short of available timber for this office, but I should 
think almost any good man might give McLachlan 
a hard fight. 

The mayor seems to be in an embarrassing posi- 
tion. First he is buffeted hither and yon by the 
moral element in the community, which includes 
the great majority of people, and next he is beset 
by forces within his own party. With the church 
federation and allied forces pulling in one direction 
and the "wide-open" element pulling in another, 
doesn't it look as if a man of perspicuity would not 
halt for long between the two opinions? 

The mayor's attitude on the subject of the en- 
forcement of the laws regulating vice is a puzzler. 
I am told that during the campaign which resulted 
in his election he made great promises of being the 
"people's mayor", if elected. I have half a mind 
to call upon him and ask him, for my own satisfac- 
tion, how he defines the word "people". If he thinks 
he is keeping his promises he must regard the most 
flagrant violators of the laws pertaining to houses 
of ill-fame, to liquor selling and kindred topics as 
being the "people". What little Puritan blood 
there is in my veins rushes to my head every time 
I think of the disgrace attaching to the Harper ad- 
ministration. How sick all decent "people" must be 
when they consider the attitude of this sworn up- 
holder of the laws toward th e 'worst forces in the 
city! I would as soon be in Tom Savage's shoes as 
in those of Arthur C. Harper — for Savage is ac- 
countable to nobody but his Creator, while Harper 
is accountable to his Creator, to the people of Los 
Angeles and to his own conscience. 

I heard the other day that young Marshall StinT 
son, wdio is making the race for the state senate in 
one of the districts which includes a portion of Los 
Angeles, had received assurances from several in- 
fluential Republicans who have not identified their.- 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



selves with the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican 
League but who are supposed to be "regulars" — in 
other words, adherents of the old organization of 
the party — that some of the men selected as candi- 
dates for delegates by the "regulars" were with him, 
at heart, and that more than one of this class had 
openly expressed the hope that he would be the ' 
candidate of the party. I met Mr. Stimson the other 
day at the weekly luncheon of the City Club, to 
■which an acquaintance invited me, and was greatly 
impressed by his seriousness and his sincerity. It 
seems to me that if the "regulars" mean half what 
they say about putting forward the best available 
men in their party, they should place no obstacles 
in the path of so clean a young man as Mr. Stimson. 

The mother-in-law question threatened to be- 
come an issue before the Fire Commission the other 
day when Commissioner Anthony Schwamm be- 
rated a former member of the fire department for 
being too much of a "mollycoddle" to take a firm 
stand against a bossy mother-in-law. "A man 
should have courage enough," he is reported as hav- 
ing declared, "to be his own boss and not take or- 
ders from his mother-in-law;" whereat, according te 
a newspaper report of the incident, "the other com- 
missioners were strangely silent and hastened to 
vote to reinstate" the applicant. "Strangely" silent? 
Really, I see nothing strange in their silence. Why 
should any of them object to the dictum that a man 
should not be subject to the orders of his wife's 
mother ? 

I want to meet this man Schwamm, whom all his 
friends call "Tony". Not only because of the fact 
that he is willing to go upon record as fearing notl> 
ing from a mother-in-law, but because he has the 
reputation of being the only man identified with the 
present municipal administration who has the nerve 
to tell the mayor "where he is at" when he thinks 
it is expedient to do so. With a little training in the 
right camp I believe that our "Tony" would become 
a mighty useful citizen. 

Doesn't it strike you that the organizations which 
are "booming" Los Angeles are making a mistake 
in not devoting more printer's ink and paper in di- 
recting the attention of the world to this city and its 
environs as a summer resort as well as a winter 
resort? I have been most agreeably surprised at 
the qualit)^ of the climate here this summer. Some 
of the inhabitants "kick" about the so-called hot 
weather, but I believe they have forgotten what 
they left "back East", or wherever they came from. 
I have not tested the climate of the whole world, 
but one thing is certain: There is nothing .that I 
know of or have ever heard of, in America, that 
equals the climate of this particular region during 
the summer season, all things considered. If more 
people knew of the relatively even temperature, the 
comparative absence of humidity, of high winds 
and of summer storms, I believe many who have 
been educated to believe that the climate of the 
town is inviting" in the winter time only would pre- 
pare to make this their permanent home. 

If any think that I have been "kicking" about 
some of the inequalities and inconsistencies I think 
I have beheld here, let me say to such as these that 
the incomparable climate of Los Angeles, in my 
opinion, more than makes amends for its short- 
comings. 

STIMULUS. 



The Crown of Civilization 

By a Counselor of the Gods 

The Counselor has often been asked, what is the 
aim and end of civilization? Why this lurid struggle 
for perfection, since we compromise on half meas- 
ures and partial friendships so readily? There must 
be a summit to our endeavors somewhere. Every 
hill has an apex: every effort a culmination. What 
then is the highest attainment among human prod- 
ucts? It cannot be an honest man, for he abounds 
and is as common as pease cod and as frequently 
sewered by his fellows. 

Diogenes was wrong. Honest, men are not rare. 
He made the mistake of turning the rays of his lan- 
tern in the wrong direction, peering among the 
shadowy habilaments of his neighbors for honest 
purposes. Had he turned his lantern light inward, 
he would have found many honest men in his 
gloomy tub, as men always do when dazzled by the 
glamor of their own hearts and tanglefoot appetites, 
the bombasts of rectitude. 

Neither can the supreme excellence of civilization 
be found among poets. They fill too many bulging 
waste-paper baskets with basic facts fantastically 
dreamed, the threads and nuggets of gold which 
support the mountain peaks. They are a waste 
product, not as yet useful in our social chemistry. 
No more may we consider the novelist as the sole 
cherished chroniclers of truth and beauty, for our 
library shelves creak with weighty fictions in every 
department. The Counselor may say nothing about 
liars, for, of course, civilization has nothing to do 
with them. They are only remnants, job lots of 
veracity — frills of the social bargain counter pur- 
chased with reduced esteem. They have an- appar- 
ent vogue as peddlers, prophets and press-men and 
sustain many enterprises which without them would 
languish — such as fishing, flirting and fighting, occu- 
pations which scorn altruism and precision of state- 
ment. In politics liars are unknown. We forget 
for the moment the synonym for diplomacy. 

After much searching, careful investigation and 
inspired thought, the Counselor has discovered the 
crown of modern life. The secret was whispered 
to him by Venus when Minerva was nodding. He 
has found the pinnacle of art and the synthesis of 
science. It is the Pretty Woman of today. 

This discovery is unique and of celestial import. 
She is the product of the ages without numbered 
years. All philosophy lisps before her. Reason is 
dumb in her presence. Her cheeks defy art. Her 
"figure" is scientifically made. Man builds depart- 
ment stores to cloth her. Mortgaged houses en- 
shrine her. Flowers are her incense and fruits her 
sustenance. Latch keys protect her and, fumbling, 
beguile her tongue into the utterance of dulcet mor- 
alities, the decalogue of seedy dawn. She is im- 
perial, IT. the acme of desire for all men, be they 
courageous dyspeptics or timid chewers of gruesome 
mastication. Ate she not glucose, where would our 
candy shops be? Feared she not the man under the 
bed in the most virginal chambers, what could be 
done with the iron poker? She is the missing link 
between savagery and mental science. Her ques- 
tionings produce abundant euphemisms for the 
sports of action, variable conduct, which enrich all 
modern languages and swell the bulk of dictionaries, 
slang and otherwise. Her cooking makes home a 
cheerful place to leave alone. Her endearing con- 
fidence creates all the farce comedies there ever 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



s and 
mim! — it i> v -;\\ 

her mind, which lias the well-known charm 
hidden treasure which is never found. 

in the closei quivers and rattli 
pathy with the frou-frou of her mineral 

with her has the fascination 
summer sea ■•!' fitful winds, be- 
nd brigandage. Man is 
r sure of which port he can make amidst the 

Hail. Beautiful Lady! Daint) sponge <>f all de- 

tinselor and all men bless thee. Source 

ttion.s and forgiveness, magical princess of 

many philtres whence are distilled wrath and 
and sulphured treacle, broken 
vows and adoration! < >, beautiful creature, gay il- 
lap shot of a boyish vision kodaked 
during a dream Abide, tantalizing sugar plum, 
surfeit of the feast of life. You are worth the row 
twixt trusts and criminality. Pretty She! 

* + * 

Germs on DrinKing Cups 

The greatest awakening of science in the open- 
ing ■ the twentieth century is the awaken- 
ing of the people to the fact that most human dis- 
eases are preventable, and a large proportion of 
early deaths avoidable. At lease 700,000 of the mil- 
lion and a half deaths occurring- annually in the 
United States result from the minute parasitic 
plant- and animals gaining access to the body. 
These invisible foes wage a continual warfare 
against both strong and weak, rich and poor. Civic 
duty, as well as self preservation, demand that 
these life-destroyers should, as far as possible, be 
shut out of the human system. 

The evidence condemning the use of the common 
drinking vessel upon any occasion, whether at 
school, church or home, is derived from three 
sources — the frequent presence of disease-producing 
bacteria in the mouth ; the detection of pathogenic 
germs on the public cups, and the discovery that 
where a number of persons drank from a cup 
previously used bv the sick, some of them became 
ill. 

A cup which had been in use nine days in a school 
was a clear, thin glass. It was broken into a num- 
ber of pieces and properly stained for examination 
with a microscope magnifying 1,000 diameters. The 
human cells scraped from the lips of the drinkers 
were so numerous on the upper part of the glass, 
according to the Technical World, that the head of 
pin could not be placed anywhere without touching 
several of these bits of skin. 

By counting the cells on fifty different areas on the 
glass as seen under the microscope, it was estimated 
that the cup contained over 20,000 human cells or 
bits of dead skin. As marly as 150 germs were seen 
clinging to a single cell, and very few cells showed 
less than ten germs. Not less than a hundred 
thousand bacteria were present on every square 
inch of the glass. 

* + * 

"Won a Prize 

"Well, wbere's that caok?" demanded his wife. 
"Don't tell me that she wasn't on the train." "She- 
was on tlie train.' 'timidly explained the commuter, 
"hut 1 got to playing card- ami a Lonelyville man 
won her at whist." — Philadelphia Bulletin. 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We you up a home in almost any part of 

tlu- city- from B . the Westlake Dis- 

trict, Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in ami talk with US. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Harvey McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson. Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 






R 

E 
S 

D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



properties 



B 

u 

s 

N 

E 
S 
S 



mnbevbill Sbirt Co. 

Makers of Gentlemen's 
Custom Shirts 

Phone F 6715 414'i South Broad-way 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets. . 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 
ROBERT MABISON. Salt Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle 


{Bargains 


Onlt,. 


Rentals, Loais, Investments, 
Insurance 






GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

REAL ESTATE 






Phone F 1466 






902 Security BIJg.. Los Angeles 


Col. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



NicKnames of the States 

The following are the nicknames of the various 
states of the Union : 

Alabama, "Cotton" ; Arkansas, "Bear" ; Califor- 
nia, ''Golden" ; Colorado, "Centennial" ; Connecticut, 
"Land of Steady Habits", "Freestone", "Nutmeg" ; 
Delaware, "Diamond", "Blue Hen" ; Florida, "Pe- 
ninsula"; Georgia, "Empire State of the South"; 
Illinois, "Prairie", "Sucker"; Indiana, "Hoosier" ; 
Iowa, "Hawkeye" ; Kansas, "Garden of the West", 
"Sunflower" ; Kentucky, "Bluegrass" ; Louisiana, 
"Creole", "Pelican" ; Maine, "Lumber", "Pine- 
Tree" ; Maryland, "Old Line" ; Massachusetts, 
"Baked Beans", "Bay and Old Bay", "Old Colony" ; 
Mississippi, "Bayou"; Missouri, "Iron"; Michigan, 
"Lake", "Wolverine" ; Minnesota, "North Star", 
"Gopher"; Nebraska, "Black Water"; Nevada, 
"Silver", "Sage Brush"; New Hampshire, "Granite", 
"Switzerland of America" ; New Jersey, "Garden" ; 
New York, "Empire", "Excelsior" ; North Carolina, 
"Old North", "Turpentine" ; Ohio, "Buckeye" ; Ore- 
gon, "Webfoot Country", "Beaver" ; Pennsylvania, 
"Keystone"; Rhode Island, "Little Rhody"; South 
Carolina, "Palmetto" ; Tennessee, "Volunteer" ; 
Texas, "Lone Star" ; Vermont, "Green Mountain" ; 
Virginia, "Mother of Presidents", "Mother of 
States", "Old Dominion" ; West Virginia, "Switzer- 
land of America" ; Wisconsin, "Badger". 
* * * . 

The Danger of Smoke 

The pity of it is that the evils which come from 
smoke are all preventable, says Hollis Godfrey, in 
the Atlantic. Smoke-consumers exist which have 
proved their worth. Due care in running fires will 
do much. No more fuel is required under careful 
management to produce combustion which shall be 
practically smokeless. Those statements have been 
proved over and over again. It is a matter of com- 
munity supervision, of laws rightly framed, and 
fearlessly administered. Fortunately inspection is 
by no means a difficult matter. One city, for ex- 
ample, handles that problem by means of a chart 
holding six pictures of a chimney above a factory, 
the first of which shows the chimney with no smoke, 
the second with a light smoke issuing, the other four 
showing greater and blacker volumes. The first 
conditions are passable. The last are dangerous. 
The inspector takes a photograph of any question- 
able chimney and compares it with the standard 
pictures. The comparison tells the story. The fac- 
tory is pronounced "passed," or the owner is warned 
to immediately conform to the regulations under 
penalty of the law. 

* * * 

Sublime and Ridiculous 

In a happy letter from a traveler in Egypt the 
following sentence aroused a smile : "As I was jog- 
ging in from the Pyramids on a donkey, in the glori- 
ous Egyptian moonlight, impressed deeply by the 
grandeur of the Sphinx and the tombs of the Kings, 
which seem' so much more stupendous by moon- 
light, my Arab guide thus broke in upon my 
reverie: 'This donkey's name is Happy Hooligan!' 
So the sublime and the ridiculous are blended, as 
soon as the great American eagle spreads his wing 
over a country." 

* * + 

Mrs. 'Newlywed — I want to buy a steak. Lum- 
berman — Hickory, oak, or ash ? Mrs. Newlywed — ■ 
Porterhouse. Lumberman — You'll find that in the 
butcher shop. This is a lumber yard. — Judge. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom that the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. 


NATH ANSON 




LADIES' TAILOR 


HABIT MAKER 


...HigHesI 


Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 




216 Mercantile Place 




We 

Pay 

Special 

Attention 

To 

Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIEIYJ 



i Miss I I I arnicliia Mary 

■ Mrs Rosi tta Sn Kent 

in St. Luke's Episcopal 
church Tuesday evening by the Rev. Robert Lloyd 
The bride v lo»l by Miss Angie 

group of her school 
- bridesmaids, who include Miss 
Miss luniua Shinle, Miss Anita Lest- 
wick, Miss Helen Pardo. Miss Mabel Stellman, 
se Tabor and Miss Annie Jenkins. The 
ttended by William Mallinger. The 
ushers were Grant Hughes, Harold Mills. Ormon 
ber, Roy Gara, Floyd Woodworth, Paul Hat- 
field. Arthur Damon and I.e Roy Workman. 

Auf is the date set for the wedding of 

Miss Lucille Chandler and Raymond \Y. Stephens, 
which will occur at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jefferson Paul Chandler. Miss Man- 
Chandler will attend her sister as maid of honor. 
while Mrs. A. T. Patton, a second sister, and Miss 
i larpenter, Miss Mary Lee, Miss Helen Newlin 
and Miss Helen Wells will be bridesmaids. The 
Hewer girls will be Beatrice and Katherinc Ward. 

Judge and Mrs. Stephen C. Hubbell announce 
te engagement of their daughter, Mary Snell, to 
W. I.. Graves, Jr.. son of Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Craves. 
The bride-elect is a graduate of Marlborough, and 
for one year was a student in Mount Vernon 
school. Washington, D. C. Later she went abroad 
for a six months' tour with Mrs. C. A. White's 
party, returning to Los Angeles last October. 

The wedding of Miss Nellie McCormick, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McCormick. to Henry 
L. Hiss of Redondo lieach, took place Wednesday 
morning in St. Agnes' church. A wedding recep- 
tion followed at the home of the bride's parents. 

Invitations have been issued for the marriage of 
Miss Margaret Louise Fitts of Los Angeles and 
Herbert Nelson Lowe of Long Beach, the ceremony 
to take place August 1 1 at the home of the bride, 
No. 1?7 West Forty-ninth street. 

Mrs. F. F. Crowell of San Jose and her daughter. 
Miss Latham, who for several weeks have been 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. I'. Snyder, have gone to 
San Francisco, where they will make a brief visit 
before returning home. 

Miss Marshall and Miss Maude Marshall, daugh- 
ters of Mr. and Airs. T. B. Marshall of Grand View, 
have returned after an absence of two months in 
Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Doheny entertained in- 
formally at their home in Chester place Monday 
evening in compliment to Mr. and Mrs. Herbert 
C. Wylie of Ebano, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

In compliment to her house guest, Miss Eula 
Howard of San Francisco, Miss Bessie Bartlett en- 
tertained at an informal musicale Tuesday even- 
ing at her Hollywood home. Vista del Mar. The 



sts um: Miss \ Goetz, Mrs. Gara 

Bussing, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Zobelein, Mrs. I.e Roy 
Jepson, Mis- Florence Bartlett, Messrs. [oseph 
Dupuy, Heber ( oleman, Harold Fergusson, Cecil 
Frankel and Wilde. 

Miss Estelle Marie Martin, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Martin of \,,. 2301 fourth avenue, was 

married in St. Agnes church Wednesday morning 

t< i \\ ill Marion Vaughey of t hi, 

Mr. a\^\ Mr-., k. \\\ Poindexter and daughter, 

who have just returned from a year's absence in 

Europe, have gone to Montecito for a two-weel 

visit with Mr>. Poindexter's family. 

Mrs. Wall,.-,- D, Snub, nil. formerly Miss Lillian 
Murdock of Los Angeles, whose home is in Mexico. 

is visiting her mother. Mrs. George Murdocl 

The marriage of Miss Mabel F. Childress and 
Robert M. Ford took place Sunday afternoon at the 
home of the bride's aunt, Airs. D. O. Childress. 

Mrs. H. K. Williamson has returned from a two 
months' trip to San Francisco, Yellowstone Park 
and Alaska. 

Mr. and Mrs. William McEwcn of No. 2301 Pasa- 
dena avenue announce the marriage of their daugh- 



^Tsf" 4 ^ 




So. Hill Sthebt 



A. FUSENOT CO. 



Fall Dress Goods 



NEW CREAM 
WOOLENS 



We have just received our fall line of 
Cream Woolens. The assortment in- 
cludes sheer weights for evening wear, 
medium weights for street costumes, 
and heavy weights for outing suits for 
both men and women. Plain weaves, 
hair lines and self stripes are included 
in the assortment, which is the most 
complete we have ever shown. Prices 
range from 50c to $3.00 a yard. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



ter, Miss Helen Margaret, and Ralph R. Bowan of 
Fresno, the ceremony having been solemnized Aug- 
ust 1 in Fresno. 

The engagement of Miss Olive Haviside, daugh- 
ter of J. J. Haverside of San Francisco, and N. W. 
Zimmer of this city has been announced. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Emery of West Fifth street 
and Miss Kate Snediker are in the Grand canyon, 
en route for the Atlantic coast. 

Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss 
Maude Estes and Frank C. Mulks, which was 
solemnized Monday afternoon. 

Mrs. Charles E. Stafford of New York is in Los 
Angeles, the guest of her sisters, Mrs. W. W. Gibbs, 
Jr., and Mrs. R. L. Brown. 

Mrs. H. J. Whitley and daughter, Miss Grace, of 
Hollywood, who have been in Europe since last 
fall, have returned. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Sherer of Wilshire 
Heights are enjoying a visit to Lake Tahoe and 
San Francisco. 

Miss Gertrude Cohen will sail this month for Eu- 
rope, where she will study the piano for several 
years. 

Dr. Harvey Gordon McNeil has returned from 
an extended European tour. 

The Rev. J. Arthur Evans of Hollywood has re- 
turned from England. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Robertson are at Hotel El 
Tovar, Grand Canyon. 

Mrs. Ralph Hagan has returned from her trip to 
Alaska. 

* * * 

Concrete Boats 

A striking illustration of the applicability of con- 
crete is to be found in the concrete boats and barges 
that have been built by a shipbuilding firm on the 
banks of the Tiber, at Rome., The method of con- 
struction is simple and the boats are quickly made, 
at less cost than the ordinary kind. They will stand 
very rough usage, are practically indestructible. 
It is also said that the smooth surface of the cement 
finish offers less resistance than wood and that the 
bottoms do not foul easily or collect seaweed. In 
case of damage to any portion of the boat, repairs 
are quickly and cheaply made with cement or con- 
crete. A comparison of cost with steel barges has 
shown that the concrete boat can be constructed 
at half the cost of steel and that in the matter af 
maintenance the cost is about a fourth or third less. 
A 100 ton concrete barge was constructed to the 
order of the Italian government in 1906. She was 
tested in the military harbor of Spezia, and was so 
successful that a contract was placed for four more 
barges on the same lines. These particular barges 
have a double sheet forming watertight compart- 
ments, and are practically unsinkable. Their di- 
mensions are SI feet length and 16 feet beam. 
4 <$• igi 
His Guaranty- 
Fair Customer — "Is this color fast and really 
genuine?" 

Gallant Shop Assistant — "As genuine as the roses 
on your cheeks, madam." 

Fair Customer — "H'm ! — er — show me something 
else !" — Punch. 



Plan to Visit 

Yosemite 
Valley 

_ This Season 

NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, ob 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Pine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 

Phone F 5141 Tenth and Main Sts. 



Much Truth in a Few Words 

— "It's not so much, HOW much you pay — 
— it's what you GET for what you pay." 
Furniture that you buy 'here is GOOD — the cost 
as low as anywhere. 

Ipa j\n§eles furniture C°- 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRINGS!. 

Between SIXTH and SEVENTH STREETS 

TuTniture. Carpets. Rugs. Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



FOR SALE 



A No. 7 Blickensderfer Typewriter, 
in fine condition, almost new. Cost 
$50.00. :: :: :: 

$J5 Cash Gets It 

Call at Pacific Outlook Office 



Pacific Outlook 



l.S 




"The Servant in the House" 

"I :iin your brother." 

Tims, in the last words spoken in "The Servant 
in the ll"ii^i". is summarized Ehe whole of this 
compelling drama, lis keynote is the hunger for 

brotherh I. the spirit of Christian socialism. 

Rarely is one of the hi^bost ideals of mankini 
perfectly crystallized a< in the play seen this week 
at the Mason. Rarely, it' ever, is so powerful a ser- 
mon preached from behind the footlights. It is 
doubtful if a deeply religious theme were ever more 
-t'actorilv worked out for the Stage than this 
he strange, mysterious servant who finally 
becomes master of the household, through his of- 
fices planting harmony where discord once pre- 
vailed. 

The redemption of an outcast brother of a clergy- 
man in the Church of England is the central inci- 
dent of the drama. So human is it all. so graphically 
are portrayed the realities of the relations between 
man and man. that the heart is held in the grip of 
compassion. It is easy to sec how the seeds of so- 
cial unrest have been sown; it is easy to see what 
is necessary if the discordant notes' in the song of 
human existence are to he eliminated. 

Tyrone Power, in the role of Robert Smith, the 
outcast, is the central character in this play. Re- 
pudiated by his own brother, a thorn in the side of 
his fellow-men, his own self-confessed worst enemy, 
bis heart has become filled with malice and vindic- 
tiveness. His desire to see the daughter who has 
been a stranger to him since her birth leads him to 
visit his brother, the clergyman, whose home is also 
the borne of the girl. There, for the first time since 
bis downfall, be meets a man whose heart is filled 
with transcendant human kindness and brotherly 
love — the mysterious servant in the house, Man- 
so:!, the butler. Under the ministrations of the lat- 
ter, who typifies the Savior of men, all hatred of his 
brother disappears from the heart of the wayward 
one, and through the same influence the man of the 
cloth is brought to a realization of his error in will- 
ingly permitting the development of total lack of 
harmony between himself and the other of the same 
flesh and blood. 

Tyrone Power is eminently fitted for the strong 
and difficult part assigned to him. Through the 
superficial — the debauched and despondent man, — 
the native character, the latent sense of honor, the 
hunger and thirst for some display of the true spirit 
of brotherhood, are discernible from the moment he 
meets and recognizes his daughter. In the climax 
an exalted manhood, though clothed in the habila- 
nients of the erstwhile debauchee, rises superior to 
environment and all ulterior influences. 

The vest of the cast has been well chosen. Ed- 
mund Rami Kennedy, brother of the author of the 
play, Charles Rami Kennedy, makes an admirable 



vicar. Edith W. Matthison in the role of the 
vicar's wife exhibits a keen perception of the char- 
acter which is supposed to lie requisite for one in 

that position. Arthur Lewis, who does the pari 
of the Bishop 'if Lancashire, i- well adapted 
most difficult role. Gwladys Wynne as the daugh- 
ter of the outcast brother of the vicar is eminently 
satisfactory. Galwey Herbert, in the minor role 
of the page-boy, overdoes it at times, but his faults 
are slight. 

The most trying role of all is that assumed by 
Walter Hampden, who is cast as Manson, the but- 
ler. In vestments similar to those supposed to have 

been worn by the Savior, with his lineaments made 
up to carry out the idea that he is in fact portray- 
ing this sacred character, his identity being un- 
known to the others with whom be comes in con- 
tact, his true character is, however, easily recog- 
nized by the audience. The apparent disclosure of 
his identity causes a slight shock, which disappears 
as the play progresses and as the audience under- 
stands that, whether man or superman, he is per- 
forming the work for which the Master of men 
came to earth. The idea of reincarnation fits se- 
curely enough into the scheme of the play; and al- 
though it may be said to be a daring essay on the 
part of a playwright to introduce such a character, 
the moral worth of the production is so obvious 
that none but the veriest carpers will criticize ad- 
versely — provided, of course, the drama be not re- 
duced to farce by the employment of incompetents. 
"The Servant in the House" should be seen by 
everybody. It points a moral and teaches a lesson 
that we all need to learn — some more than others, 
perhaps; but those who have observed the tend- 
ency of the age along social lines cannot fail to be 
impressed with the tremendous truth which Mr. 




A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
clue to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zbe Starr piano Co. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



Kennedy seeks to drive home through the medium 
of stagecraft — that as the Son of God was not only 
the Savior but the brother of ail mankind, so man, 
to approximate the higher ideal, must keep alive 
within his breast that spirit of brotherly love which 
ultimately must make all men kin — actually, not 
theoretically. 



"Julie Bon Bon" 

A comedy in four acts called "Julie Bon Bon" 
is being presented by the Belasco Stock Company 
this week with creditable success. It is a bright 
little piece without any heavy plot or great sig- 
nificance. It is a play the interest of which depends 
a good deal on the dash and spontaneity of the 
actors, and in spite of the gay scenes one can not 
help feeling that the participants in the mock 
"sporty" orgies are not having a very good time of 
it. There is a touch of seriousness in parts which 
are almost at once turned into makebelieve again. 

The spectator does not have a chance to be seri- 
ous very long. Julie is a virtuous, pretty, capable 
and innocent-minded young woman. About her 
are silly girls of another type, several delightful 
young men who regard evil as a curiosity of an 
archaic age, and an impossible father, the best- 
drawn character in the play. Julie remains perfect. 
This only shows how good a woman can be when 
she tries. M'iss Jane Grey as Julie did very well, 
playing with well-restrained abandon the supper 
scene. She has an attractive personality which min- 
isters to her success in roles 'of this sort, of half- 
serious, half-seductive character. 

William Yerance has not had for a long time' a 
part better suited to his abilities than that of Pou- 
jolp, the selfish, scheming, wholly drunken and part- 
ly vain and tender father of Julie. He acted admir- 
ably and happily for the audience he did not have to 
enact a tipsy scene. Mrs. Van Brunt was well done 
by Miss Eleanor Carey. Her simulation of hysterics 
in the second act was kept well within bounds. This 
act, however, did not have much bearing on the 
trend of the play and only served to emphasize the 
duplicity of some women and the usual helpless- 
ness of manly expostulations in the face of Niagara 
tears. Papa Stevens, an old beau, was impersonated 
by Charles Ruggles with merited success; and al- 
though apoarently an ungrateful part, Mr. Rug- 
gles won for the character much sympathy, as he 
hardly deserved the final desertion. 

"Julie Bon Bon" helps to pass a pleasant evening 
and may be styled a good French comedy, suited to 
a New England conscience. It will easily aid the 
Puritan in his evolution and help to emancipate him 
from his village formulae without in any way of- 
fending his spinster sisters, though it may teach 
them how really to smuggle imitation lace. It is a 
play of emasculated vice, of purified naughtiness 
sweet to look upon. 



"The Judge and the Jury" 

"The Judge and the Jury" is a romantic melo- 
drama by Oliver Morosco. The "Judge" is God 
and all the men and women in the world are the 
jury. In this play the mob which forms the "jury" 
does its work very badly and incidentally gets 
Maquita into much trouble. Chilcote, a New Mexi- 
can miner, loves her, doubts her and finally marries 
her. The action takes place in a mining' camp and 
William Desmond, as the wavering yet faithful hero 




Is a California product — made especially for the 
housewift. It's a cleanser for the borne and is 
adapted to use on 

Iron 

Steel 

Brass 

Copper 

Windows 

Woodwork 

and Porcelain Ware 

USE-IT 

TiTe AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



I HE 1908 

MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in SigHt) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bail-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing oyer the common 
friction bearing. Our typebar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 



1 / 



cnliarly suited to him. 

sensibilities i I the camp arc wounded 

n of Maquita and Ikt imported 

theart, whom the Anthony Comstocks of 

the camp attempt to banish. This is the weakest 

the prud- 
ish ■ a Vermont village on the 
borders of the Grand Canyon. However, the four 
h fun and e love-making 
to while away a summer night. Byron Bea 
filled the role of Greenway very well, in spite of the 
rather un preachment he has to deliver in 
the last act. Elsie Esmond cleverly portrayed a 
not-to-be-allowed-to-languish maid who eventually 
wins her flic second scene was bright and 
pretty. Louise Royce made an excellent shrew 
what doubtful of married bliss, 
ginning Monday next Avery Hopwood's play, 
"Masters of Men", will be given. [Catherine Kirk- 
wcod will appear in this production, which promises 
to be of unusual interest. 

D( IN. 

Belasco Offerings 

The Belasco theater will in a measure, fur the 
■ if August 10. return to first principles. I'll 
offering "The Wife", the Belasco theater stock com- 
pany will he seen in the first play ever produced 
on that stage. Yet in all its annals nothing heller 
or stronger has been clone than this joint effort of 
David Belasco and H. C. DeMille, which first made 
the name of Belasco remarkable in theatrical cir- 
Two of the original members of the first com- 
pany are still in the cast. Richard Vivian and How- 
ard Scott. -Ml the rest, though in many cases dating 
hack several vears in their present employ, are new 
to "The Wife". 

This comedy of New 7 York life is too well-known 
to need exploitation here. Belasco patrons will be 
delighted again to welcome it here. The cast will 
include every favorite in the company, with Jane 
Grey as Helen Truman, a role peculiarly fitting her 
temperament. Fred Belasco has been here superin- 
tending its reproduction, and an elaborate revival is 
thus assured. 

Following the presentation of "The Wife", Mr. 
Belasco will offer an entirely new comedy written 
for the coming of the National Insurance Under- 
writers' Association, entitled "Muttsburg Life In- 
surance" or "All in the Family". It is a roaring 
comedy from the pen of James Crawford, author of 
"The Beauty Shop". The insurance men will at- 
tend in a body. 



What Stage Stars Earn 

Paderewski is said not to be fond of the Ameri- 
cans. They make him tired. But they are fond of 
him to the pitch of idolatry, and he has undoubted- 
ly carried, at the lowest estimate, $1,000,000 out of 
the country. His contracts have been as much as 
$250,000 for one visit to the States for a specified 
number of concerts, and, in addition, he has per- 
formed at the houses of wealthy magnates, to whom 
a cluck for $5,000 for three or four pieces on the 
pianoforte is a mere bagatelle. 

Flic De Reszkes have also reaped a golden har- 
vest in America. They have probably had, first and 
last. $500,000. Ten years ago even, when they were 
first beginning to be the idols of the opera-goer, 
their contract in the States for fifty performances 



was 5 h and 15 

$7,500. i that they m I 

jointly on that occasion not less than 

Since then they ha een in the States many 

times and have bi popular than ever, SO 

thai $1,000,000 won],] probably be near the mark of 
their total earnings. 

Ac. Xordica, and especially Melha have made 
what to the average person would be a \er\ snug 
fortune during sojourns in the State- extending 
over hut a few months. The first two have certain- 
ly had as much as Si. 500 for each of fift) perform- 
ances, while Melba has had double thai sum. 
I'alti still holds the record— but Patti is I'atli. 

Mrs. Langtry in her recent peregrination through 
the Stale- made a pretty little penny, and Bern- 
hardt has, by a percentage of the receipts only — 
surely the fairest way of taking remuneration — 
added as much as $100,000 to her hanking account. 

- wonder she can travel like a queen! Eleanora 

Duse won not only golden opinions in America, but 
golden coins as well. for. though she paid only a son 
of Hying visit, she netted $50,000. Even Irving, 
with his huge expenses, was said to make an aver- 
age profit of not less than $50,000 on each of his 
later visits ; and Miss Ellen Terry was not left out 
in the cold by any means. 

But, if it is true that our leading vaudeville art- 
istes are to be paid as much as $2,500 a week, the 
exponents of the legitimate drama are easilv outdis- 
tanced. But it was ever so. People would always 
pav to be amused. Years ago Yvette Guilbert eot 
$4,000 a week in the United States, and Chevalier 
earned $17,500 in a brief tour. 



Mrs. Nellie Hibler of Hollywood, well-known 
as a vocal instructor, has opened a city studio at 
No. 345 South Spring street, over Birkel's music 
store. She has associated with her several teachers, 
covering the piano, violin, harmony and physical 
culture, and has prepared to give pupils a thorough, 
well-rounded musical education. 



Coquelin tells against himself a story of the diffi- 
culty he experienced in getting into the Paris Con- 
servatoire, admittance to' which was refused him in 
his youth because he was not considered sufficient- 
ly good-looking for an actor. 



DuBois (Sh Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street. Los Angeles, Cat. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets A r ~p /^ /^V f> HP 

Draperies /\ [ LUj 1 

Lace Curtains 



^ 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds and Investments 
Broker and Dealer in 

high grade: securities 

202 Mercantile Flace at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By Pkrez Fibld 

Seumas MacManus will sail for America Septem- 
ber 12 to give his third course of lectures in this 
country. His subject will be "Irish Life", "Irish 
Fairy Stories" and "The Irish Revival". 

Walter Lecky says of him : 

"Seumas MacManus has sprung from the loins of 
those whom he depicts ; he is as one of the soil, a 
Celt with all the dreams of his race, with all the 
tales and traditions of that race in his brain; and if 
there is a part of Ireland where those tales are a 
living force it is in sequestered Donegal, where for 
centuries wandering minstrels and grey-haired sires 
have bequeathed them to wondering, quick, imag- 
inative Celtic children as a birthright to be handed 
down with faith and nationality. Our novelist has 
sat by the peat fires ; child of his race, he has with 
open eyes and wondering heart heard the tales of 
minstrel and sire, and now he comes 'to sat up', as 
he tells us, 'his merry-go-round by the way.' The 
dream of his life has been to carry into the lives 
of those far away from home the faith, patriotism, 
wit, humor, drollery, and sunshine of Erin; to 
write books that the exile might read by his fireside 
to his children who would never see the land of 
their father's love and longings: books wherein 
rose the characteristics of their race presented in 
living men and women, drawn by llie pencil of love, 
moulded by faith and nationality, robust men and 
women, not by any means iaultlesc, It :s true, but 
men and women that will bring no blush of shame 
to the exile as he reads, nor lo his listening children. 
This has been the dream of Mr. MacManus. That 
dream is today a reality." 

Hall Caine accompanied Rossetti to Margate and 
the last trip he made just before he die 1, when Lhe 
poet was suffering greatly and very weak. Rossetti, 
however, tried to amuse Caine's sister, as the author 
relates in a recent number .if M. A. I'. 

"We traveled in ordinary carriages now, taking 
with us the domestic servants from Cheyne Walk, 
a professional nurse, and my sister, then a little girl. 
Though so weak, Rossetti was in good spirits, and 
I remember that on getting into the compartment he- 
tried to amuse the child by pretending that the car- 
riage itself had been built expressly in her and his 
honor. 

"Look here," he said, pointing to the initials on 
the carpet (as it was the. London, Chatham, and 
Dover Railway), "they have even written our name? 
on the floor, L. C. and D. R. — Lily Caine and Dante 
Rossetti." 



Memories of Londom in the Forties, by Davit 
Masson (Blackwood), contains four chapters on 
"Down Street, Piccadilly", and "A London Club", 
both giving reminiscences of various characters and 
a chapter on Carlvle which gives the following" ac- 
count of a walk Prof. Masson took with the sage 
of Chelsea : "Of all the walks that Carlyle and I 
took tog-ether in the old London nights that now 
lie behind me like a distant stretching dream, there 
are two which I recall now with peculiar associa- 
tions of sacredness. One summer about eleven 
o'clock we had passed our usual parting-point at 
Hyde Park Corner and had strolled into the Park 
itself, lured by the beauty of a specially soft and 
star-brilliant sky overhead. All roughness, and 



IMPERIAL 


VALLEY 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? . 


>0 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftus &, Durnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




tih@y 

SHIRT 

AND 

COLLAR 




Many new ideas in pattern 
and coloring are coming in, 
some of them exclusive with 
us. You'll 6nd them taste- 
ful to a degree, and of the 
quality you are seeking. In- 
spection invited. 



223 W. Fifth St. Troy Laundry Company 



Be sure to see 



THE 



fSSi DISAPPEARING BED 



The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Jtrtistic Designs 
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. ^^'spmNG street 



WAmucnithin&of&ieadthutAot 

11 \ TTEEiM^ IT T 



Kt3, 



TTJ53 




BUTTEflA 
vNUT/ 



For 4Wf T nTJ!Jfl^ <!c * 
grocer yf^f LosAntfeles 



UT 

fee* I 
inpany 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



quer was In a mood of the 

serenity. As wt 
sauntered to and fro on th> grass, the solo human 
ripatetic, where but a Few hours before there 
had been the roar of carriages in stream and the 
parallel gallop of the equestrians, it was the stars 
and the silence that seemed to work upon him and 
-t his theme. From the mystery and 
lor of physical infinitude he passed to what 
; to be the rule of human behavior, the con- 
duct -pirit. in a world framed so majestical- 
ly and so divinely. There was too much jesting in 
it, he said, too much of more irony and of laughter 
at the absurd, too little calm religiousness and 

walk with God. In speaking of the over- 
prevalence of the habit of irony. sarcasm, and jesting 
he us len phrase of self-humiliation which I 

have never forgotten. 'Ah ! and 1 have given far too 

much into thai myself — sniggering at things.' " 

remarkable archaeological discoveries in 

Crete have already inspired one Contribution tc 
imaginative literature. The Paris correspondent of 
"The Athenaeum" notes that at the Comedeie Fran- 
caise they are rehearsing "La Furie", a four-act 
tragedy in verse by M. Jules Hois, founded on the 
discoveries of M. Salomon Reinach and Dr. Arthur 
Evans. The palace of the minotaur has given the 
dramatist his ideas for his scenery. "The Athen- 
aeum" adds : 

"The author has put his tragedy in the isle of 
Crete, that is to say, in an early home of mythology 
and religion, in order to prove the inanity of the con- 
ception of the 'Superman' of Nietzsche. The hero, 
Heracles, takes after Hamlet and Faust. Infatu- 
ated by pride, he endeavors to exceed the. bounds of 
human power and knowledge. After having per- 
formed the Twelve Labors, he wishes to undertake 
another more brilliant, and tame the monster that 
for ages has been distressing man; in short, he tries 
to vanquish Death. To attain his end, he goes as 
far as Egypt, and down into the subterranean halls 
beneath the Sphinx, to question the initiated. Pie 
there meets with the 'Bayadere' of the temple, 'La 
Furie', who enslaves him in fetters of sensuality. 
His debasement proves his chastisement. It is a 
paraphrase of Pascal's famous thought, 'Qui veut 
faire l'ange fait la bete'." 



How far should every man and woman in what 
are called comfortable circumstances take upon 
their shoulders the burden of the poverty and cruel- 
ty and injustice of the world? — this is a question 
that continually haunts the thoughts of the serious, 
and at intervals obstinately asks itself in the midst 
of the fetes and revels of the frivolous and the reck- 
less. It is the problem involved in this question that 
Mr. Galsworthy treats in his latest book — "A Com- 
mentary", which G. P. Putnam's Sons are planning 
to publish early next month. 

New Books at Public Library 

This week we have two hooks of travel added to 
the library. One *Glimpses of Italian Court Life, 
by Tryphosa Bates Batcheller (Doubleday, 1906), 
is a delightfully chatty and gossiping series of let- 
ters written by r the author to her family during the 
winter of 1904-1905 recording her impressions of 
Italia Adorata. The greater part of the letters are 
dated fom Rome and are full of social chit-chat. 



% 


^^T Exclusive 


^^ >^ 


Woman's Hatter 


French an«J 


English Models 


Special Creations for the 


Individual — Approval Solicited 


346 S. 


Broadway 



Otto Stcincn Supply Co. \ 


\ \M 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and j 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, i 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, < 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery .3 
Specialties and Novelties. "= 


Mt§ 


do it well. 


-i j Vr\ 


210 W, Third St. Los Angela 


l\J 



/v 




Japanese and Oriental 



ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANT) EMB%Ol'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality— 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kafyuchi Bros. /S^L 

533 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orier on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
loo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-00 
250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



Photographs of several leaders in Roman society 
are reproduced. 

Another book of travel is *Sub-Tropical Rambles, 
by Nicolas Pike (Harper, 1873), being an account 
of adventures and wanderings in the Island of 
Mauritius. The social customs of this island seem 
to be somewhat different from those of Rome. The 
author recounts the floggings by priests to confer 
sanctity on their victims and of a nude man rolling 
around a temple to fulfill a vow, wihle his wife re- 
moved the stones and briers and other annoying 
impediments from his path. Dusky Puritan soul — 
happy in the illusion that enough misery will en- 
sure a deferred bliss. 

Armazindy is a small volume of poems by James 
Whitcomb Riley published in 1894, and Northwest- 
ern Fights and Fighters, by Cyrus Town send Brady 
(McClure, 1907), is an account of the Modoc and 
Nez Perce wars — stirring conquests or defeats, ac- 
cording to the view taken by the reader, of abori- . 
ginal man — as an error and vice of evolution or as 
an artless and natural expression of consciousness. 

Passing Protestantism and Coming Catholicism, 
by Newman Smith (Scribners, 1908), is an essay 
on modern religious tendencies and a protest against 
the belief that "the world has.'come to a full period 
hi its institutions." 

The Bells of England, by Charles Cox, is one of 
The Antiquary Books published by Methuen con- 
taining- much curious information. Character Por- 
traits from Dickens is a selection of over a hun- 
dred sketches from Dickens's works. In Shake- 
speare's England William Winter gives some pleas- 
ant sketches of travel in Britain. 

The Young Malefactor, by Thomas Travis 
(Crowell, 1908), has an introduction by Judge 
B. B. Lindsey of Denver and is a study of the 
causes of misdeeds in children, especially boys, who 
are more criminal and more enterprising than girls. 
The author believes that tobacco is very bad for 
boys and cites one case where a lad was asked if 
he could give up smoking. He replied "I don't 
know." "Did you ever try?" "Yes, I tried one day 
to do without it for an hour. After about half an 
hour I felt as if I should die right there if I didn't 
take a smoke. I had to smoke. I couldn't help it." 

Elizabeth Godfrey has written a book called Eng- 
lish Children in the Olden Time (Dutton, 1907), 
which appears to be painstaking and instructive in 
a rather indefinite way, the illustrations having 
more charm than the text. The Political History 
of England (twelfth volume), by Sidney Low and 
L. C. Sanders, deals with the reign of Victoria 
(1837-1901). The authors, in speaking of fash- 
ionable society at the close of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tura, claim that it "had deteriorated since the mid- 
dle of the century; there was much complaint of its 
frivolity, its want of dignity, its extravagance, its 
vulgar worship of riches, its lack of interest in the 
intellectual and spiritual side of life." 

Two interesting volumes on *Ingres and *Ros- 
sitti, belonging to Newnes Art Library, contain 
numerous illustrations of the paintings of these 
two men, and a life of Kate Greenaway, by Spill- 
man and Sayard (Putnams), is furnished with sev- 
eral colored plates showing the often dainty work 
of this well-known illustrator. 

*Political Problems cf American Development, 
by Albert Shaw (Columbia Press, 1907), is an ad- 



mirable study of modern political problems, and 
during this year of national elections should be of 
especial value. The book consists of nine lectures 
delivered before the students of Columbia Univer- 
sity. What he says of the Indian is interesting. "It 
would be both interesting and instructive to trace 
the effect of our contacts and relationships with the 
Indian as affecting the development of what is most 
distinctive in American citizenship and character. 
Certain Indian traits and qualities — those of phy- 
sical courage and endurance, of silence and stoicism 
under conditions of danger and difficulty, of a cer- 
tain unassailable personal dignity — have for a hun- 
dred years unquestionably so affected the Ameri- 
can mind as to have entered very deeply into the 
quality of what we may call American personality. 
. . . Outside of our eastern cities, every American 
boy until a very recent period has been trained in 
the use of arms, has had some knowledge of wild 
animals and woodcraft, and has imbibed something 
of that personal initiative, resourcefulness, and 
capacity for self-directed action that could not have 
come alone from our early provisions for democra- 
tic equality and universal education. It came in a 
large part from the experience of subduing a great 
continent and from the actual or traditional deal- 
ings of our people with so remarkable a man- as the 
American Indian, . . . We shall always owe some 
traits and qualities of national character to our con- 
tact with the North American Indians, but we shall 
assimilate them as a race with results scarcely per- 
ceptible." Among other topics Expansion, Immi- 
gration and Public Ownership are discussed. 
*Books recommended. 



DESMOND'S 

Corner Third and Spring Sts. 

Douglas Building 

AFTER all, the most important thing about our 
clearance sale of summer suits is the suits; the 
prices are low only as compared with the real 
value You can buy now our light and medium suits that 
have been $27.50. $25. $22.50 and $20, about 

1 50 Suits in all for 



It will pay you to 

buy now even if 

you put them 

away 



$12 



It will pay you to 

buy now even if 

you put them 

away 



You never had a chance like this, because 
clothes, such as I sell, don't really need a half 
price and a 40 per cent, reduction. 

1 -2 Price This Week on 
Straw Hats and Panamas 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



U/te Stumbling BlocK 

Elimination of part) i in Canada, is the 

remedy proposed l>y Roberi 1 real Paine, jr.. of Bos- 

.111 active member of the National Municipal 

e elimination of national politics from 

municipal contests. Says Mr. Paine upon this sub- 

The party lias been in existence for a generation 
r>r more — many generations for the Democratic 
party — and too many men are brought up in a p 
and could not l>c bribed or reasoned out of it. When 
they sec their party tag upon the ballot they will 
ior it : and many times, in many cases, it means 
that just those who know hast about the city, who 
are ignorant of the vital local issues, are most apt 
to vote in the stimulated excitement of party feel- 
ing and become the deciding elements in the elec- 
tion of nominees of parties to run the city govern- 
ment. 

If you have a primary candidate of the Demo- 
cratic party and of the Republican party, the 
chances are that the majoritj of voters when at the 
polls will vote for the man who belongs to their own 
party. Inevitably, the good citizen, the reformer, is 
handicapped from the start by that dominating 
power. The only way is to abolish, to forbid abso- 
lutely, national parties in city elections. 

( »ne objection offered to forbidding party desig- 
nations upon the ballot is that you thereby eliminate 
knowledge as to the candidates. That can be an- 
swered in this way: Barring out all national party 
designations does not mean that you bar out such 
Other designations as may be required to give in- 
formation — such a phrase as may be necessary of 
six words or a dozen, or a whole page, if necessary, 
showing the platform or the principles upon which 
each candidate wishes to stand with reference, not 
to the nation, but specifically to the city. 

Mere party designations allow candidates to 
dodge or avoid a declaration as to their attitude 
upon vital principles of local application or, even 
worse, allow them to be men of no municipal princi- 
ple whatever. So. prohibiting national party desig- 
nations would not deprive us of knowledge except 
on national partisanship, which is irrelevant or an- 
tagonistic to the issue in question ; it would open 
the way to that knowledge which is available, which 
is valuable, which is necessary to the correct selec- 
tion of the man who publicly stands for the right 
principles in city elections. 

Experience is about the best teacher, and I think 
that it has been proved in Canada, where, in the 
cities, party designations are eliminated, that the 
knowledge of the voters is not thereby decreased or 
diminished. Candidates stand there for certain 
principles with refereiice to the city. 
* * * 

Life's Law 

By Dorothy Russsn Lewis 
I tried to find the germ of good 

That in black caverns grew; 
I strove to sound the purity 

In every heart I knew; 
I sought to see truth everywhere, — 

And seeking, I found you. 

And then I straggled for the wealth 

Which was your beauty's due; 
I routed glory from the mire, 

And hunted honor, too; 
I fought the world, and won at length, — 

But winning, I lost you. 




(w^. J "Whvttvxcil> 



Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



CJ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 




Pacific Outlook 



©IF &WM©iR. 



=D <T 




He Has Noticed 

"There is one notable thing I have observed," said the 
foreign traveler. "Your American women have the most 
luxuriant hair of any women on the gloibe." 

"Rats!" shouted the irreverent individual from the back 
of the hall. — Judge. 

Mixed 

Senator La Follette, in a recent interview, said of a cer- 
tain political economist: 

"His ideas are mixed and topsy-turvey. They remind 
me of a student they tell of in Heidelberg. 

"This student, the morning after the corps meeting, a 
meeting whereat he had drunk by actual count fifty-three 
large mugs of beer, awoke to find 'himself in bed ibut halt 
dressed, with his feet resting on the pillow. 

"From the low footboard the student regarded for a mo- 
meent his large feet, propped side by side on the white 
pillow. Then he muttered: ' 

"Himmel! Here I've been thinking all night that I had 
the toothache, and it's my slhoes that have been pinching 
me." — Washington Star. 

* * * 

Wasn't Fire— Nor Water 

A. M. 'Dbwnes, late secretary of New York's fire de- 
partment, related at a dinner a fire story. "At the end 
of the first act of a drama," ihe said, "a man leaped 'hur- 
riedly to his feet. T heard an alarm of fire,' he said. T 
must go and see where it is.' His wife, whose hearing 
was less acute, made way for him in silence, and he dis- 
appeared. 'It wasn't fire,' he said, on his return. 'Nor 
water, either,' said his wife, coldly." — Everybody's Maga- 
zine. 

* * * 

The Necessary 

"Oh, doctor," exclaimed the nervous young wife, as the 
eminent surgeon .entered the sick room, "if an operation 
is necessary we want you to operate immediately! Ex- 
pense is no object at all." 

"We will operate at once," replied the eminent surgeon, 
without looking at the patient. — Hertzberger's Weekly. 

Where Did He Go? 

A shade hustled up to St. Peter. "My good man," he 
said, "will you tell me where I must go to procure sou- 
venir post cards?" 

And St. Peter, eyeing him sourly, told him where he 
could to go. — Puck. 



Faith and Work 

The author of "Seventy Years Young," Mrs. Emily P.. 
Bishop, declares that it is as easy to do as to wish to do, 
and quotes this incident in illustration: 

A little girl's brother set a trap to catch birds. She 
knew it was wrong, cruel, against the laws of kindness, 
altogether inexcusable from her point of view. 

.She wept at first; then a little later her mother noticed 
that she had become cheerful once more, and inquired as 
to the cause. 

"What did you do?" asked her mother. 

"I prayed for my brother to he made a better boy." 

"What else?" 

"I prayed that the trap would not catch any little birds." 

"What else?" 

"Then I went out and kicked the old trap all to pieces." 
* t t 

An Eye-opener 

Sleepy Guest — "Halloa! is it seven o'clock? I declare I 
am so sleepy that I can't open my eyes." 

Head Waiter (who has knocked at the door) — "I'll bring 
you your bill, sir, if you like." — Tit-Bits. 



A Paving Investment 

"I suppose to educate your daughter in music must have 
cost a great deal of money?" 

"Yes; but she's brought it all back to. me." 

"Indeed!" 

"Yes. I'd been trying to huy .out my next neighbor at 
half price for years, and could never bring him to terms 
until she came home." — The Sacred Heart Review. 

* + + 

To Confirm the News 

Park Rowe — "I understand The Howler has engaged a 
bishop on the editorial staff." 

William Streete — "As a theological authority, I pre- 
sume." 

Park Rowe — "No; just because most of its news matter 
needs confirmation." — Judge, 

* * * 

The Mission Sunday School 

Teacher — And what do you suppose all the animals did 
during those forty days in the ark? 

"Smarty" Williams — They jest loafed around and 
scratched themselves. 

"Sandy" Toole (disdainfully) — Chuck it, Smarty! What'd 
they scratch for, when there was only two fleas? — Bo- 
hemian. 

Fooled Insurance Agent 

"Is this Mr. Rockford?" said the tall insurance agent as 
he slipped quietly into the office. 

"Yes, that's my name." 

"Mr. Rockford, I represent the Commercial Insurance 
Co., and " 

"I'm afraid you've come to the wrong place." 

"But I understand, sir, that you own a large Industry 
on the outskirts of the city. Am I correct?" 

|;Yes." 

"And I hear that you carry no insurance," continued 
the wily agent. 

"No, I don't need insur " 

"Now, as I was saying, a man with a large industry 
should certainly protect himself from fires. I am in a 
position to give you a fine rate, Mr. Rockford " 

"But I don't have any fires." 

"You can't tell, Mr. Rockford. No one knows what 
tomorrow may bring. A destructive conflagration would 
wipe out your immense industry and you would he penni- 
less. Just think of it, my friend. You would be penniless. 
Now, .by taking out a neat policy with me, you can save 
yourself thousands upon thousands of dollars. Your in- 
dustry will be safe. All for the small amount of insurance 
that " 

"But I don't need insurance. I don't have any fires," 
persisted the proprietor. 

"But your industry may he burning up right now," re- 
plied the agent triumphantly. 

"Let her burn. It'll he the first time a stone quarry 
ever went up in smoke." — Bohemian. 
+ * * 
A Bargain 

"Does this car go to Twenty-fourth street?" inquired 
the elderly lady. 

"No, ma'am, but I have something just as good," re- 
plied the conductor, who used to be a drug clerk. "I can 
let you off twice at Twelfth street." — Bohemian. 

* * * 
Why Not? 

Mother — Just run upstairs, Johnny, and fetch baby's 
nightgown. 

Tommy — Don't want to. 

"Oh, well, if you're going to be unkind to your new lit- 
tle sister, she'll put on her wings and fly hack again to 
heaven." 

"Then let her put on her wings and fetch her night- 
gown." 



MCM€ OmiiOOE 



^ Southwestern Weekly 



G»org» Bakwr Jtndwrton 
IDfTOH 



W. C. Jickorty 

PRtS'DtNT 



Puhtiihrd mvry Saturday 
LiMMnmr Build ng, Loa Angmlma. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

fuhicriptton prtcm S9.00 a year In advance. Single copy 5 
ctflfi on alt n + u>* at and a. 

tntcrei iiMfBRd-clm matter April <, n>-— , it (he poiiofftce ai Loa Angeles, 
California, unJcr the act of Congrrtt of Mi- r ; 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

li..- rm'lflr outliMik In iinill.il tu MtiliMcrllirrd througrh the 

llM * imrlrn I'lint O filer r»iTi 1 "rdlnj , I n In in hi be de- 

U\ iT.-tl In Kftfl |>nrl of t lie* rll y l>y Mit tinln> '» post. If for 

«ny muoi li ifaoald t»»* delayed, or lie delivered In poor 
•-onilltlnn. »ul>NiTll>4-r« \\\\\ confer a fnvor upoa the publisher* 
hy thine I hem Immrilinte DOtlce. 

Vol. 5. Los Jtngeles, Cat., August 15, 1908 Mo. 7 

\ A THOUGHT FOR THESE DAYS Q 

J Be Clean jjj 

Let your hands and your conscience JK 

SBe honest and clean; JK 

Scorn to touch or to think of W 

J The thing that is mean; fL 

But hold on to the pure y 

»And the right with firm grip, w 

And though hard be the task, Q 

9 Keep a stiff upper lip!" 5 

— Phoebe Cary. fl 

PARTICULAR NOTICE 
K6e Pacific OutlooK's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial ; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or locai interest. 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 
"YOU CAN fool some of the people all of the 
time, and you can fool all of the people some of the 
time ; but you cannot fool all of the people all of the 
time," said Abraham Lincoln. "You may elect 
what candidates you please, if you will let me name 
the candidates," said William M. Tweed. "I defy 

any person to place his finger on a 
Fooled Part single act of the Republican organi- 
of the Time zation in this state which has been 

detrimental to the people," said 
General George Stone, chairman of the campaign 
committee of the Republican state central commit- 
tee. "The Lissner Rebate League" screams the 



I os Vngeles rimes. "The issue in California is nol 
the railroads or ;i railroad. The issue is the tariff," 
cried the leaders of the Harriman-Herrin Southern 
Pacific machine in itheii - > befog the minds of 

the voters. The Southern Pacific political bureau, 
in the guise of the "regular organization" of the Re- 
publican party, will rule the state for at least two 
years more. Most of the people of California have 
been fooled for a part of the time. That the ma- 
jority of the voters in the dominant party in the 
state should so emphatically have proclaimed their 
confidence in the corrupt forces which have throt- 
tled and enthralled California as they did at the pri- 
maries Tuesday is astounding. 

BY FORCE of circumstances the organization of 
the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League within 
the Republican party in California, in a presidential 
year appeared necessary. In a presidential year 
many voters who, in other years, would be glad to 
take a hand in the purification of their party, hesi- 
tate to do so in the fear that unintelligent voters 
may be misled into the belief that the integrity of 
the party as a political entity is being attacked. This 
probably accounts, more than any other thing, for 
the failure of the anti-machine element within the 
party to achieve success this year. But when we 

remember that the league has 

Not Quite been in existence barely more 

Comprehending than a year, and that it has been 

fighting an iniquity which is pro- 
tected by fortifications which have been standing 
for a generation and a half, and which have been 
strengthened year by year, through the work of the 
legislature and of some of the courts, the result of 
Tuesday's primaries should not be viewed in the 
light of a defeat. When the time for the next legis- 
lative campaign shall have arrived the scales will 
have fallen from the eyes of many of the Republican 
voters who, in their folly or ignorance, have been 
led this year into supporting an institution whose 
existence, from every viewpoint, is inimical to the 
interests of the state and all of its inhabitants, ex- 
cepting those selfishly seeking profit through their 
identification with and support of this imaginary 
power.— No, the people are not fools. They simply 
have failed to grasp the truth yet. 
* * * 
THE LOQUACITY suddenly evidenced by Ed- 
ward H. Harriman was, at first thought, fraught 
with mystery. How came it that a man for many 
years so taciturn, so unapproachable, especially on 



4 



Pacific Outlook 



railroad matters, as Harriman, should suddenly and 

without the slightest warning open his heart and 

his lips to all comers? What 

From Sphinx prompted him to unburden his 

to Gossip mind so freely on every possible 

occasion, relieving it of great 

thoughts and theories on transportation questions, 

foreign and domestic, on government, even on local 

politics? Why has Harriman suddenly emerged 

from the realm of silence into that of friendly speech, 

even to the borders of garrulousness? Why is it 

that nearly every reporter who comes in contact 

with him is "taken into his confidence"? We go to 

the oracular Brooklyn Eagle for a reply: 

■$■ ■£■ i|i 

"READERS LOOK to their newspapers each 
evening to get light on the questions of the day. 
They want the facts from the news columns, and 
they want the interpretation of the facts from the 
men who know most about the subjects," explains 
this analyst. "They read interviews with poli- 
ticians on political questions eagerly, and they will 
read as eagerly interviews on railroad questions 
with men who control the railroads, or from bank- 
ers on financial questions. If what the railroad 

man or the banker says seems rea- 
Helps to Make sonable, fair and sensible, the 
Public Opinion reader adopts it unconsciously and 

it becomes a part of the governing 
opinion of the country. There was a time when the 
heads of great enterprises either did not understand 
this, or when they despised public opinion too much 
to take the trouble to mold it. They acted in the 
spirit of the remark long attributed to the late Wil- 
liam H. Vanderbilt, the authenticity of which is em- 
phatically denied. But that time is passing away. 
The interviews with Mr. Harriman are one of many 
evidences of a growing recognition that ours is a 
government by public opinion. In his desire to help 
to form that opinion Mr. Harriman is becoming 

loquacious." 

* * * 

NOW THAT Mr. Harriman, the one man who is 
closer and actually dearer to California than any and 
all else, has set the pace, has made it patent that a 
few words uttered at the psychological moment may 
prove the germ of revolutionary thought, we confi- 
dently expect to see many public and quasi-public 
men follow his example, in the belief that they, too, 
may have a hand in the moulding of that mighty 
force known as public opinion. Already, in fact, 
the Harriman idea has taken root. There is Patrick 
Calhoun, for instance, who has succeeded in influ- 
encing thousands of the "best citi- 
Wizardry of zens" of San Francisco into his own 
Verbosity way of thinking regarding the pun- 
ishment of criminals of the richer 
class. Unhappily, perhaps, William F. Herrin, Mr. 
Harriman's chief hired man in Californa, has not 
yet been converted to the garrulity idea. He still be- 



lieves that the man who says nothing and saws 
wood will harvest the biggest woodpile. Then there 
is our o\ra Supervisor Patterson, one of the most 
able explainers in all Southern California. Witness 
how, simply by word of mouth, he has succeeded in 
causing plastic public opinion to assume the shape 
into which he would have it grow. Verily, verily, 
the man who can grasp a great bunch of public 
opinion and make it take the form of his own ideal, 
is he not an expert in the wizardry of verbosity? 
4* <S* . 4* 
CHINA'S WAR on opium is meeting with suc- 
cess. The dreamy sway of the "dope king" in the 
land of the celestials is seriously threatened, for the 
first time since it began to assert its dominion over 
the yellow man. China is proving its sincerity by 
honestly administering laws intended to break the 
thrall in which the lulling poppy has held the nation 
for centuries. The' recently enacted 
The Opium prohibitory laws are being rigidly en- 
Demon forced against both rich and poor, and 
as they plan a gradual reduction of the 
use of opium until, at the end of ten years, it is 
interdicted altogether, it looks as if one of the 
world's greatest vices, if not indeed the greatest, 
had sustained a fatal blow. During the past few 
months not only have tens of thousands of China- 
men on their native heath abandoned the use of 
the drug, but as an earnest of their desire to give 
up its use forever they have permitted their pipes — 
in many instances costly articles; — to be burned in 
public. 

* * * 

IT IS NOTEWORTHY, however, that the Chi- 
nese government has not undertaken this tremen- 
dous reform single-handed. The whole world has 
aided her in her fight against this once overwhelm- 
ing evil. Queen Alexandra served as one of the 
officials of the international organization whose rep- 
resentatives did much to teach the Dowager Em- 
press of China that it would no longer be wise to 
oppose the world protest against the unlimited pro- 
duction, and use of opium. The United States like- 
wise has lent liberal aid. Thomas Burke of Seattle, 
Dr. Hamilton Wright of Maine and Dr. Charles D. 
Tenney, Chinese secretary of the American legation 
at Pekin, are members of an international commis- 
sion which has offered many valuable suggestions 

as to the best methods by which the 
Americans course of opium could be lessened 
Enthralled pending final obliteration. The first 

two of these gentlemen are devoting 
their time to the collection of data on the opium 
traffic in the United States and in the Philippines, 
and Dr. Tenney is studying the situation in China. 
The San Francsco earthquake helped to solve the 
problem in this country, for it wiped out of exis- 
tence an area where more opium was smoked than 
in any other part of the country. The Chinese dens 
of San Francisco contained thousands of men who 



Pacific Outlook 



had ' to the di well 

hinese. It has been stated authority 

that among the whites who visited this quarter to 
opium-smoking were some 
of ti of the town who, beginning 

perhaps merely as an experiment ><v f >r a "lark". 
finally tell victims to one of the most insidious vices 
which has ever enthralled mankind. 

♦ ♦ + 
ST VXDING face to face with this fact, it will be 
seen that the attitude of the American government, 
through its representatives, is not wholly unselfish 
ami disinterested. 'Hie terrible experience of China 
with this drug has been an awful warning to other 
nations, including the American people. Though 
the earthquake of April. 1906, wiped out the San 
Francisco <lens. others exist in large cities else- 
where in this country — in Chicago. Xew York, 
Philadelphia, Xew ( Irleans in particular. Los Aii- 
. i- said to have its quota. In fact, it is 
doubtful if any city having a few hundred Chinese 
inhabitants is free from Americans 
Wipe It Off who have become addicted to the 
the Earth habit. Many a man visits his local 
"Chinatown" ami "hits the pipe" 
once or twice to learn by experience what its ef- 
fects will be. He finds out and sometimes also finds 
himself unable to abandon its use. The whiskey 
habit is as nothing when compared with the opium 
habit. The occasional use of this intoxicant does 
not produce the sensuous "pipe dreams" following 
the smoking of the drug which has reduced the 
Chinese empire to its present lamentable condition. 
Nevertheless the wake of whiskey is strewn with 
enough wrecks to incite popular interest in its 
deadly effects. Not until whiskey in America has 
gone the path opium is now traveling in China will 
humanity in this country be said, with truth, to be 
free from the danger of mental and moral degrada- 
tion. 

+ + * 

"SO, IF WE pick up the greatest of the San 
Francisco newspapers at the present time," said 
William Marion Reedy in the course of a recent 
lecture on "The Myth of the Free Press", "we are 
likely to find editorials belittling the efforts of Mr. 
Francis J. Ffeney to bring to justice the men of so- 
cial, political and commercial prominence, indicted 
for participation in the boodle regime in that town, 
the high financiers and the tools thereof. The 
eminently respectable participants in the benefits 
of crookedness are excellently satis- 
Eminent fied with not going any further than 
Respectability the conviction of Eugene E. 
Schmitz, the union labor mayor of 
the city by the Golden Gate. It is ridiculous to 
read in almost all the greater journals editorials on 
the San Francisco situation, in which, ignoring the 



fact that the town was corrupted by the public 
vice corporations, the whole blame for the awful 
rottenness exposed there is laid upon the fact of 

union labor dominating the politic^ of that town." 
\\ e would Ike to havi a line from this famous editor 

expressive of his opinion on "the eminently respect- 
able participants" in the recent dubious victory of 
the infamous Southern Pacific political machine in 

this si 

♦ + + 

TlloMAS R. BARD, former United States sena- 
tor from California, in speaking of the control of 
the Republican party in this state by the Southern 
Pacific railroad's political bureau, says: "It is a 
fact, and I assert it with positive knoweldge, that 
Mr. Hcrrin. the recognized chief and manager of 
the corporation's political interests, has admitted 
that, according to their view, it is necessary for 
these corporations to control the legislature, the 
state board of equalization and the railroad commis- 
sion, and to secure the nomination and election, or 
appointment, as judges of our 
They Find It courts, of men who command their 
"Necessary" confidence, in order that their great 
property interests in the state may 
be protected against tin- prejudices and antagonism 
of the people." When a man of the character of 
Senator Bard states "with positive knowledge" that 
William F. Herrin has said or admitted that which 
he declared Mr. Herrin has admitted, that puts an 
end to all controversy. The Southern Pacific finds 
that "it is necessary for these corporations to con- 
trol the legislature" and to secure as judges of our 
courts "men who command their confidence". Does 
any man ask for any stronger and more definite 
statement as to the attitude of the present Demo- 
cratic proprietor of the Republican party in Cali- 
ornia than that made by honest, truthful, fearless, 
yet conservative Thomas R. Bard? 
+ * + 

"GIRLS DRUNK from Dance Hall Orgy— Ar- 
rested at the Chutes in Maudlin State — Had Been 
Plied with Wine and Beer by Young Men and Are 
Taken to the Central Police Station — Ruth Rub- 
shaw, aged 16, aad Margaret Page, 18 years of age, 
were arrested at Chutes park last night by Lie/ut. 
Lehnhauseri and Acting Sergeant Loomis of the 
University district. These girls, both pretty and 
well dressed, were found in a maudlin condition 
from drink, having- been plied with beer and wine by 
young men whom they met in the dance hall. The 
police were unable to learn which of 
A Sunday the young men had given the girls the 
Incident drink, or they too would have been ar- 
rested and put in jail. The girls were 
locked up at central police station with the charge 
of 'drunk' placed opposite their names. They re- 
fused to give their parents' names or their ad- 
dresses." This lamentable incident, briefly but 



Pacific Outlook 



graphically described in the local columns of the 
Herald, occurred on Sunday. The young men who 
gave the girls the intoxicants could not be found. 
We wonder if the policemen were half as active in 
their search for the men who SOLD intoxicating 
liquors on Sunday, in defiance of the law, as for 
the men who bought it. 

* * <■ 

A PROMINENT New York banker has com- 
piled a list of "the richest men in the United States". 
John D. Rockefeller is put down as the richest, be- 
ing accredited with $600,000,000. Andrew Carnegie 
is reputed to possess $300,000,000, William Waldorf 
Astor $300,000,000, J. P. Morgan $150,000,000, Wil- 
liam Rockefeller $100,000,000, H. H. Rogers $100,- 
000,000, William K. Vanderbilt $100,000,000, Wil- 
liam A. Clark $100,000,000, etc., etc. With all due 
respect to this eminent authority, we question his 
judgment as well as his source of information. Is 
the richest man the man possessed of the greatest 

supply of a so-called precious metal or its 

Who Is equivalent? Is John D. Rockefeller, with 

Rich? his multiplicity of millions, really a rich 

man? In what is he rich? Does not his 
poverty counterbalance, a hundred-fold, his reputed 
wealth? Poor in health, poor in spirit, poor in the 
respect of his fellow-men and likewise in self- 
respect, is he not a pitiable object? Carnegie, laden 
with ill-gotten gains, the result of a raid upon the 
treasury of the United States made possible by the 
machinations of bureau chiefs in Washington, which 
he is now distributing as a salve to his conscience — 
what other wealth does he possess? Rich as the 
world defines the term, he is poor according to the 
■definition of wealth we find in the lexicon of soul. 
Who is poorer than a man possessing nothing but 

yellow metal? 

* * * 

The "World's Progress 

The Iowa Supreme Court has handed down a de- 
cision which invalidates a city election in Des 
Moines because women were not allowed to vote, 
incidentally deciding the right of women to vote in 
Des Moines in all elections involving the expendi- 
ture of large sums in improvements. There is a 
statute in Iowa permitting women to vote in local 
elections on the issue of bonds or rthe levying of a 
special tax for improvements. The question sub- 
mitted to the voters was, "Shall the city of Des 
Moines erect a city hall, at a cost not exceeding 
$350,000?" Des Moines officials refused to receive 
the ballots of women, and a committee of women 
appealed to the courts. The lower courts decided 
against them, but (the Supreme Court reversed the 
decision. Another election must be held. 

Twenty-five years ago the first Brooklyn bridge 
gave the engineer's earliest answer to the traffic 
problem to which the ferries were no longer ade- 
quate and became one of the modern wonders of 
the world. The new Manhattan bridge is the latest 
and most advanced embodiment of the suspension 
bridge, while as a traffic channel it possesses, or 
will possess when completed, Ithe greatest capacity 



of any bridge yet built. In total length over all, in- 
cluding approaches, from Canal street in Manhattan 
to Nassau street in Brooklyn, the Manhattan Bridge 
measures 6,855 feet, as against the 7,200 feet of the 
Williamsburg Bridge. Its main, span is 1,450 feet 
long and the two side spans are each 725 feet. The 
itotal length of the spans is thus 2,900 feet. The 
main span of the Williamsburg Bridge is 1,600 feet, 
the longest suspension span in the world. The Man- 
hattan cables are slung from steel towers which 
stand 325 feet in height above the mean high water 
level of the East River, 90 feet higher than the Wil- 
liamsburg towers. They contain, together, 12,500 
tons of steel. 

A transcontinental balloon race, starting from 
either Los Angeles or San Francisco, with the At- 
lantic seaboard as the objective point, is being 
planned by the Federation of American Aero Clubs. 
The race probably will be held in November. A 
cash prize of $25,000 is to be offered for the aero- 
naut who finishes the race, or the one who finishes 
first, provided more than one succeeds in making 
the trip. 

The Van Cortlandt extension of New York's sub- 
way has been completed. It extends as far north 
as Two Hundred and Forty-second street. It is now 
possible to ride from Brooklyn to the northern 
terminus of the line, a distance of twenty miles, for 
five cents. The first section of the subway was 
opened to traffic October 27, 1904. The entire work 
has cost about $60,000,000. 

Ex-Secretary Taft expresses the conviction that 
the paramount question now before the American 
public is "the improvement of the administration 
of justice, civil and criminal, both in the matter of 
its prompt dispatch and the cheapening of its use." 
The thing to be done, in his opinion, is to render 
' the administration of justice as prompt as possible; 
"the evil is in the delay more than anything else." 

The bungalow, which first sprang into popularity 
in Southern California, has been working northward 
until it is now asserting itself in Washington and 
Oregon. Many handsome residences in the cities 
of these states are nothing more or less than bunga- 
lows, though in most cases extremely well-made — 
not "California houses." 

The flight of Zeppelin in his airship along the 
Rhine, of Baldwin in his at Fort Myer and the ex- 
periments of Farman here, and of Wright in Paris, 
with their flying machines, serve to emphasize the 
fact that aerial navigation is to be the next great 
triumph of man over the forces of nature. 

Governor Hughes will be continued in office if 
the Republicans can carry New York next fall. He 
has decided that it is his duty to stand again, and 
Republican sentiment appears to be almost solidly 
in his favor 

Another corner in cotton is forming. If the price 
goes to 16 cents a pound, adding about $30 to each 
bale, the Southern planters will collect over a bil- 
lion dollars on this year's crop. 

The value of imports entering the port of New 
York during the month of July, 1908, was but $53,- 
383,434.80, as compared with $77,109,899.86 for the 
month of July, 1907. 

The Pitltsburg "stogies" may have to go. The 
sociologists say that the factories where they are 
made ruin the health of the young girls who work 
in them. 



Pacific Outlook 



DOES CHRISTIAN SCIENCE HEAL? 



How the Question is Answered by Well-known Business 
Men of Los Angeles 



■pjajHK question is being universally 
ra|S|| ucc heal the sick?" 

* ■ " The Pacific I I eking to answer the 

question in a specific, definite and satis- 
factory manner. has secured the Following 
ligned statements from prominent, reputable and 
ional and business men of Los 
covering their experience in Christian 
ice. 
The Pacific Outlook has the signed originals of 
these statements, and conforming to its policy as in- 
dicated in its editorial preface to this and previous 
5, lias no comment to make for or against, but 
ublishing these statements as a matter of public 
interest and in response to a demand for information 
on this subject. 

Frank Garrett, attorney-at-la\v, member of the 
firm of Haas, Garrett & Dunnigan, relates his ex- 
perience as follows : 

In the spring of 1902 I made application with 
the New York Life Insurance Company for a policy 
of life insurance, and pursuant to the rules of the 
company presented myself at the office of its ex- 
amining physician to submit to a physical examina- 
tion. In due course of time I was notified that my 
application had been rejected owing to the fact that 
adverse reports had been' made by the medical ex- 
aminer. Up to that time I had supposed I was per- 
fectly sound physically and had no reason to doubt 
my ability to pass the examination, but inquiry at 
the office of the medical examiner of the company 
disclosed the fact that I had been rejected on the 
ground that I was suffering from kidney disease. 

I then called upon my regular physician who, 
after examination, told me that I had Bright's- 
disease and put me upon a diet. In September, 1902, 
I became very ill and for seven months was under 
the care of physicians in Los Angeles who treated 
me for Bright's disease. During this time I lost 
flesh so that in March, 1903, I was but a shadow 
of my former self, weighing but about 115 pounds, 
whereas at the time I was taken sick I weighed from 
175 to 180 pounds. 

While in this condition some of my friends sug- 
gested Christian Science treatments, but I had no 
faith in Science and clung to materia medica until 
the doctors finally gave me up ; then as a last resort 
I turned to Science and in but a few treatments 
realized a marked improvement in my condition, 
and today I am as strong and healthy physically as 
ever in my life, having regained my flesh and being 
entirely free from any evidence of this disease. 

To my friends my recovery seemed miraculous, 
and almost daily for "months after I had regained my 
health I was approached by first one and then an- 
other who greeted me saying, in almost every in- 
stance, that they had despaired of my regaining my 
health and had daily expected to hear that I had 
passed away. Since that time I have had numerous 
smaller ailments which have always been readily met 



and overcome in Science and it is, therefore, a great 
pleasure to me at all tim< s to give to my fellow men 
an account of my experience in Science in the hope 
that by so doing some good may result to mankind, 
as well as in token of my gratitude to Science for 
all benefits which I have received physically, 
mentally and morally. 

G. G. Johnson, a well-known real estate dealer, 
says: 

For fourteen years I had been troubled with 
numbness, rapidly increasing each year until cir- 
culation in my lower limbs had amost ceased, when 
three years ago a general breakdown occurred, and 
during five months' serious illness, with all that 
medical science could do I was absolutely helpless. 
My great bitterness and hostility against what I 
thought Christian Science was made it very hard 
for me to embrace Science, but I did so and in less 
than two weeks I was better than for years, and for 
the last year I have been in better health than at any 
other time in over twenty years that I have been in 
active business in this city. Not a drop of medicine 
have I touched in the three years I have been in 
Science and I have had several very serious attacks 
of la grippe and gall stones. I had indigestion every 
day for thirty years, but Christian Science healed 
me absolutely in a very few weeks. It is impossible 
for me to find words to express my gratitude to God 
and to Mrs. Eddy, who has shown us the way, and 
to my practitioners for all the help received. 

J. F. Jack of the Title Insurance & Trust Com- 
pany, offers the following testimony: 

My first pronounced physical healing was in the 
spring of 1905, and might be regarded by many as 
a very simple matter because the complaint over- 
come was and is of such common occurrence that 
its coming and going are usually accepted as a mat- 
ter of course. 

I had long been subject to colds. I would have 
at least two or three hard colds each year, and as 
time passed these attacks became very severe. At 
the time of which I speak there had been a very 
heavy rainstorm, the weather was quite disagree- 
able and the streets in the lower part of the city 
were flooded, During the day I had contracted a 
very severe cold which settled on my lungs and 
which grew so much worse toward evening that I 
called a practitioner and asked for absent treat- 
ment, not wishing to expose myself to the weather. 
The practitioner requested me to call at her office. 
I complied somewhat reluctantly and remained 
there about thirty minutes. By the time I reached 
home the pain had entirely left my lungs and the 
next morning I was quite well, and have not had a 
cold on my lungs since that day. 

Although this healing was very pronounced and 
almost instantaneous, it was not unexpected. But 
in that one treatment I received a healing which 
was a great surprise to me. For twenty-five years 
I had been a smoker and my cigar was a great 
pleasure and comfort, but I was cured of the habit 



8 



Pacific Outlook 



at that time. Possibly this cure was the more re- 
markable because I had not thought of nor desired 
such a result, and my practitioner was not even 
aware that I was addicted to the use of tobacco 
in any form. 

Charles H. White, chief clerk of the passenger 
department of the Southern Pacific Company, 
writes : 

For several years I was a sufferer from several 
disorders, including an affection of the kidneys and 
bowel trouble, which finally brought me to the verge 
of a nervous collapse. This latter condition was no 
doubt aggravated by the excessive use of alcoholic 
stimulants taken in part in a vain endeavor to 
keep up my failing strength. 

While in this condition I witnessed the instan- 
taneous and, to me, wonderful healing of my wife 
from a serious disease through the ministrations of 
a Christian Science practitioner, and I was thereby 
led to apply for similar treatment. The result was 
that in less than ninety days the disorders named 
had disappeared and this favorable condition has 
continued. 

I realize that by the application of this great 
truth I have become a better man physically and, I 
trust, morally and spiritually. This healing occurred 
over five years ago, since when no material remedy 
whatever has been used in our household, we rely- 
ing entirely upon the teachings and demonstrations 
of Christian Science to meet our every need, without 
fear and with full confidence of favorable results. 
Christian Science has brought to myself and family 
health instead of sickness, harmony in place of dis- 
cord, peace and joy where once were sorrow and 
discontent. 

I sincerely render thanks to God and to our re- 
vered leader, Mrs. Eddy, for this great truth which 
has come into my life. 

The Hon. John D. Works, former judge of the 
Supreme Court, one of the most widely known citi- 
zens of Los Angeles, contributes the following : 

I' have now been in Christian Science for some- 
thing over five years. I came to it a broken-down 
man, overcome by the cares of business and the 
burdens of disease. I sought the help of a practi- 
tioner solely for. physical relief, with a very slight 
understanding or appreciation of what Christian 
Science is or the extent of its powers for good. I 
applied for help in a state of hopelessness, mentally, 
and with only enough faith in it to give it a trial. 
I was suffering from a disease of the stomach of 
many years' standing, which during the previous 
year had taken on an acute form, giving me great 
and constant pain and headache day and night, and 
causing extreme nervousness. I had lost thirty 
pounds in flesh within the year, and strength cor- 
respondingly, until I was almost incapacitated for 
business. I had sought relief of many doctors ol 
various schools, but with no better result than tem- 
porary surcease from pain, and generally not even 
that. I thought myself to be in desperate straits. 

Christian Science gave me almost, if not quite, im- 
mediate relief. It relieved my mental condition, 
eased the pain and suffering, and filled me with 
hope. My healing was slow. I came up out of the 
depths of disease, suffering, and despair into the 
blessed sense of health, hope, and peace, much as I 



had gone down, steadily but surely. It was four 
months, or thereabouts, before I was able to say I 
was healed, and about a year before I fully regained 
the flesh and strength I had lost. This gave me the 
opportunity I so much needed, and the incentive to 
study Christian Science, which I did earnestly, 
eagerly. It possessed my mind with a better, a 
higher understanding of God and His' goodness, 
and filled me with a sense of trust in Him that was 
genuine and sincere ; it relieved me, in a great meas- 
sure, of the burdens of fear, distrust, doubt, and 
worry that had oppressed me. 

In addition to the one trouble about which I was 
most concerned, I had others of less moment. As 
the result of a severe attack of lung trouble, nearly 
thirty years before, there was supposed to be an 
adhesion ; and I had frequent colds, which caused 
me much pain in my side, as a result of this condi- 
tion. After coming into Christian Science I rarely 
had a cold, and for the last three years or more I 
have had none at all, and the pain in the side from 
which I suffered so much has entirely disappeared, 
greatly to my relief. In my business Christian 
Science has done much for me in the way of re- 
lieving me from its worries and distractions, thus 
making my burden much lighter. 

W, E. Brown of the Brown-Winstanley Co. 
writes : 

About the year 1890 I suffered from nervous 
prostration, which finally ended in a nearly com- 
plete physical and mental breakdown, to such an 
extent that I could no longer attend to my busi- 
ness. In my effort to get well I appealed to a 
number of physicians, tried various kinds of medi- 
cines and surgical operation, and 1 when Christian 
Science found me I was on milk diet, half-starved, 
and in a state of absolute helplessness and despair. 
In this condition I sought the aid of a Christian 
Science practitioner and almost immediately began 
to receive benefits. I began eating in a normal 
manner and was enabled to return to business. 
Since that time no medicine has ever been admin- 
istered in my home. Results have occurred in the 
births of our children and in restoring health in 
acute diseases of various kinds, that have made me 
feel grateful for Christian Science. 

In addition to the physical benefits received I have 
been wonderfully helped ethically and spiritually. 
I have been enabled to treat my fellowman with 
more consideration and fairness, and life is not 
nearly so narrow and selfish as it was prior to my 
learning of Christian Science. I have found this 
teaching to be of great value in the business life, 
enabling one to cope with difficulties which would 
otherwise be disastrous. He is indeed fortunate 
who possesses an understanding of genuine Chris- 
tian Science. 

P. R. Mabury of the H. & J. Mabury Trust Com- 
pany says : 

For the past eighteen years I have used no other 
method of treatment than Christian Science for the 
cure of the many and varied cases of sickness and 
mental suffering I have undergone. Ulcerations of 
the teeth, severe attacks of tonsilitis, pneumonia and 
grippe and chronic stomach trouble have been 
healed ; and for several years past I have enjoyed 
a degree of health — together with a capacity for 



Pacific Outlook 



.1 as 

.1 hope i iring 

■ 
ugh the r. v. moral and spiritual in- 

fluenccs of this system spells > depression, 

the habit of -harp criticism, and a continual state 
■ and burden of business care- have, 
•cfiillv affirm, been materially altered: so 
that I am today happy in a more cheerful and 

nee, a kindlier, truer interest 
in my fellow-men. All 1 have today of health, pi 

mankind and true realization of 
man's spiritua Christian Science. 

F. E. W Hey, prominent in the mining field, 

writi 

my wife lay three months in a 

very critical c was given up by the physi- 

-. turned to Christian Science for treatment. 

ami was raised in three or four days to health and 

gth. 
I was, at the time, suffering from a complication 

of \ ere condition of stomach 

trouble, nervous prostration, a disordered condi- 
tion of the heart, piles, fistula, fistula abscesses, and 

for nearly a year I had been afflicted with car- 
buncles. 

I did not think Christian Science could help me, 
notwithstanding the wonderful healing of my wife, 
and tried everything else, growing worse all the 
time. At last, in utter despair, 1 turned to Chris- 
tian Science and was healed. 

Through Christian Science I have a well, happy, 
harmonious family: whereas formerly we were sick, 
unhappy and inharmonious. We have found an 
ever-present, all-powerful, all-lovingr God, through 
knowledge of and reliance on whom all suffering, 
worry and discord can be wiped out — a God who is 
a help in my business, as well as the home — de- 
stroying worry, fear and inharmony. 

These are only a few of the blessings which have 
come to us through the understanding of Christian 
Science — for which we praise God, and thank Mrs. 
Eddy. 

A. F. M. Strong, capitalist, says: 

I am asked why I am a Christian Scientist. In 
reply I would say that about three and one-half 
years ago my wife was healed of diseases pro- 
nounced by physicians to be incurable. The result 
was so remarkable I began the reading of the book, 
"Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures", 
by Marv Baker G. Eddy, and as I read I became 
deeply interested in its wonderful statements, and 
as I had some diseases I tried as best I could to 
follow its rules of practice, and with some help 
from practitioners I met with decidedly gratifying 
results. 

So I can say I know Christian Science is both 
Christian and Science. Christian because it has in- 
creased in me the power to love God, good, and my 
fellowman, and Scientific because by following the 
rules laid down in the text book I have lost my 
diseases. 

John C. Smith, one of the leading architects of 
the city, says: 

About five years ago my attention was directed 
toward Christian Science as a healing power, for 
the removal of a tumor. For about fifteen years 
the tumor had been steadily growing larger and 
was located near the spinal column, and at the time 
1 speak of, great pain began to manifest itself in 



The Power of Imagination 

Has Moved the World Forward in 

Science, Finance, Literature, Business 

Cm you imagine the future of Lo! '' 

.lay 300,000 nean million pop 

lion than it w.i- rhen no question 

of its conl 11 do have the r> 

of im le future you should 

own Busim Read this: 

"Twenty-fivi 

■ 
school lot on of Spring and Si 

Streets (the present site of the Bryson Build 
purch 01 with [20 pring 

1 ne on Bi > I then Fort 

Si reet) for $12,500 i ■ ■ an : - 1 'lace ni n» runs 
ugh the property The property is :ii the pres- 
ent time worth $10,000 a foot, taking in t he two 
frontages. The cost a quarter of a century ago was 
$100 a foot in round numbers. The increase is too 
times, or an average of four times a year. In per- 
centages this is 1000 per cent in the quarter of a 
rv or an average of 40 per cent a year." — Edi- 
torial. I. os Vngeles I imes, June 1. 190S. 

The Trustee Company divides the best business 
property into fractional parts called "Units". As 
'business property is the safest and best paying prop- 
erty, so are these Units the safest and best invest- 
ment offered the public. 

Get the Great Idea — Unit Ownership. 
Ask for Booklet No. 9. 

The Trustee Company 

424 South Broadway 

(Broadway Central Building) 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 

W.H. JENKINS, Mgr., Wr>ry & '-"•' 



ce, 1811 Orange Street 



J 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



the- affected part and I suffered great agony at 
times. At this juncture my wife, who had been 
studying Christian Science for. a short time, sug- 
gested Christian Science treatment. Knowing 
there was no alternative but a surgical operation, 
I decided to try it. At the end of one week's treat- 
ment a small opening appeared in the skin through 
which the dissolved tumor. was ejected and within 
the period of two weeks all discharges had ceased 
and the opening had healed up. 

The effect of this treatment upon my mode of 
living was fully as radical as the physical healing. 
Habits that I thought were necessary to my well- 
being and existence were discontinued. I was healed 
of the liquor habit and the tobacco habit, which had 
held me in bondage for over twenty-five years, and 
I began to feel like a new man. I then took up the 
study of Christian Science and during the past five- 
years have had ample opportunity to test the efficacy 
of its teaching. 

In my own family I have known where severe 
attacks of pneumonia, partial paralysis, indigestion, 
appendicitis, and a long-standing case of eczema 
have all been met and healed by Christian Science 
treatment, using no material remedies whatever. 
Christian Science has also brought to us an under- 
standing of the Bible as a daily guide to daily action, 
and to realize in a measure the meaning of the 
words of our Master, Jesus the Wayshower: "Ye 
shall know the truth and the truth shall make you 
free." For all this my family and myself feel grate- 
ful to Almighty God for His boundless mercies, 
and also to Mrs. Mary B. G. Eddy, the discoverer 
and founder of Christian Science and author of the 
text book "Science and Health with Key to the 
Scriptures", who has made known to this age the 
Truth about God and man. 

Roland P. Bishop of the firm of Bishop & Co., 
and one of the best known business men of the 
Pacific coast, offers the following : 

When looking back to my boyhood days, I re- 
member that there was always the fear that I might 
have consumption. I lost a brother at that time, 
and, later in life, another member of my family died 
of this same disease. 

Soon after this second death my health failed 
and my doctor told me my lungs were affected. 
Getting no benefit from medicine, I tried many 
changes of climate for five years, frequently return- 
ing home feeling somewhat better; but my relief 
was only temporary and I realized I was growing 
weaker and finally gave up all hope of getting well, 
when I learned of and took up Christian Science. 
My first treatment gave me some relief, and after 
two weeks' treatment I was cured. That was ten 
years ago, and since that time I have been well and 
have had no return of the disease. 

In our family, our little son, two years of age, 
had learned to talk without any difficulty when sud- 
denly he commenced to stammer and grew so sensi- 
tive about it that he would make no effort to ex- 
press himself. After ten days' treatment in Chris- 
tian Science he was able to speak as well and as 
easily as ever and has had no return of his trouble. 

S. K. Lindley, well-known as a successful real 
estate dealer, makes this interesting statement : 

About eight years ago I was troubled with sick 
headaches, constipation, ' liver and bowel trouble 
and was living on toast and tea. I could get no 
relief from materia medica and did not think I 



DESMOND'S 

Corner Third and Spring Sts. 

Douglas Building 

Give Me $12 and Take 

My $28, $25, $22 

and $20 Suits 

Here's August coking her nose right around the 
corner and my fall lines just about to fall into line. 
Think of it. These swagger, splendid tailored ex- 
clusive summer clothes of mine going at half price 
and at 40 per cent reduction. You never had a 
chance like this, because clothes such as I sell don't 
really need a half-price spur to get them moving. 
Come here this week and take your pick and I'll 
take my loss at $12. 

Straw Hats and 
Panamas This Week at Half Price 




Plan to Visit. 



Yosemite 
Valley 



This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, 01 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 



Wall Paper Bargains 

Another carload just received. Good Wall Paper, 
1 cent a roll. Pine Gilt Paper, 5 cents a roll. Best 
Moire Ceilings, 5 cents a roll. Ingrains, Raw Silks 
and Varnished Tiles. The Best Patterns of the 
Best Makers. Free sample books to everybody. 

New York Wall Paper Co. 

Phone F 5141 Tenth and Main Sts. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



con' I then turned to Christian Science 

and was relieved of all I am a thor- 

oug! have had 

ample evidence that it can heal when other s\ - 

nee treatment 
I weighed loJ pounds and low as saffron, 

and I now weigh 160 pounds and enji lealth. 

In addition to the physical healing I have re- 
ed I have also been benefited morally, spiritually 
and financially ami h.v. it help in 

a btl My whole life has been trans- 

formed and I am very grateful indeed l" Mrs. Eddy, 
• has made all this possible. 

I. Petermichel, official reporter for the Superior 

illow 9 : 
hristian Science was recommended to me by 
friends at a time when my case had been pro- 
nounced by physicians one of incurable consump- 
tion. Treatment was commenced as a last resort, 
as I had never heard of it as a remedial agency and 
had no faith in it. One week's trial treatment re- 
sulted in such marked benefit that the treatment was 
continued for five weeks, when 1 was able to re- 
turn to my office and resume work. Without fur- 
ther treatment by a practitioner, and only by my 
applying the rules of Christian Science as I gleaned 
them from the study of its text book, a perfect 
restoration to health resulted within about two 
years' time after taking the first treatment, and I 
have been during the past seven years, and am to- 
day enjoying, the best of health. 

The physical healing I esteem a very great bless- 
ing, but I am most grateful to God and to Mrs. 
Eddy for the gracious Christ Truth that has come 
into my life through the teachings of Christian 
Science and which Truth as made me free from 
bad habits and wrong thoughts, particularly destroy- 
ing the desire for intoxicating liquors, excessive 
use of tobacco and profanity, has made me a better 
citizen, a better husband and father and more lov- 
ing and helpful to my fellowmen. 

Lewis R. Works, assistant city attorney, presents 
the following candid statement of the effects of 
Christian Science treatment in his case: 

My experience with Christian Science has been 
of the most satisfying character. It began five 
years ago, at which period I took my first treatment, 
the object being to procure relief from the liquor 
habit. I took treatments for several weeks, but was 
really healed upon my first visit to the practitioner. 
I have had no desire to drink and have not drunk 
since. 

I can bear testimony to the efficacy of Christian 
Science as axi agency for the prevention of disease 
as well as for the cure of it. In our household we 
have used no medicine for five years and have kept 
well without it. Our sole dependence has been upon 
the healing and saving power of God and our con- 
fidence has not been misplaced. It is no exaggera- 
tion for me to say that all I have and all I am I owe 
to the epoch-making discovery of Mrs. Eddy, in 
other words to Christian Science. My gratitude can 
know no bounds. 

George A. Hart, one of the proprietors of the 
Natick House, writes as follows : 

One year ago last October I was taken down 
with inflammatory rheumatism, and although my 
wife had been interested in Science for about five 
years and during this time I had seen her healed of 




Exclusive 
Woman's Halter 
French and CnglisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 



346 S. Broadway 



Otto Stcincn Supply Co. V 


V V^S) 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 1 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, ' 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, j 




bcusors, Shears, Culler y -",* *■ * V 1 W J'J' 1 
Specialties and Novelties. ^=^s^mi^^ J \ P ~\j£ 


do it well. 


1 VjL^-\\ 

~~ i tCT \ 


210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 


IV) 




Japanese and Oriental 



ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS AN<D EMB'K.Ol'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our' prices are reasonable. 

'Di'refl 
TOSt Importers 
533 South Broadway 



Kar\iuchi B 




Visit ors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orler on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 

ioo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-00 

250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



many troubles, yet I did not think Christian Science 
was what I wanted ; and after suffering for six 
weeks at home and- taking baths under materia medi- 
ca I was able to go about my business again. But the 
physician warned me to be very careful what I ate 
in the future, as anything containing uric acid 
would bring back the rheumatism. During the 
year following I was in constant fear of rheumatism 
and did have some slight attacks. In October last 
year I was again taken so that I could scarcely get 
out of bed and was in intense pain. This time I 
told my wife I was ready to try Christian Science, 
and in about twenty-four hours after the first treat- 
ment I was entirely free from pain. I did, however, 
have p'ain at intervals for five days, but since that 
time have never felt any return of the trouble and I 
eat what I like without fear. Since then a severe 
attack of la grippe, headaches and colds have been 
relieved within a few hours under Christian Science 
treatment. For all this and the spiritual uplifting 
which has come to me through the study of the 
principle of Christian Science, I am indeed grateful. 

M. C. Adler, formerly head of the Adler Clothing 
Company, and vice-president of Harris & Frank, 
says : 

About four years ago I was a physical and mental 
wreck, vainly seeking health in different climates 
and varied medical advice. I had gone through 
several trying accidents with a saddle horse and had 
overworked myself in business, which brought on 
what was termed acute nervous prostration, so that 
I was hardly responsible for my actions and was 
forced to leave my business. Besides wrecked 
nerves, I suffered from neuralgia, heart failure and 
rheumatism, which made me almost helpless. I tried 
everything, but could not control my nerves in busi- 
ness, and could take no medicine for rheumatism on 
account of heart trouble; so in despair I turned to 
Christian Science, and that with no hope of relief or 
success, because I had read some of Mrs. Eddy's 
book and considered it foolish chatter for women 
and children. But my first treatment opened my eyes 
to the grand Truth and I saw I had found (the spiri- 
tual awakening I had been looking for all my life. 
My nervous trouble left me at once and the rheuma- 
tism in a few days, so that I returned to my business 
and have worked steadily ever since, directed by the 
Truth of this Science. I found a religion, of deeds 
and not creeds, and I found people who were living 
their convictions. I now know what Christ meant 
when he said "Know the Truth and the Truth will 
make you free" — meaning free from all discord, both 
mental and physical. I had lived a very Bohemian 
life and I now find I have just as many friends as I 
had before I gave up liquor and tobacco. I am very 
thankful to testify to the benefits received from the 
beautiful Truth taught us by Mrs. Eddy. 

G. M. Giffen, the well-known real estate and in- 
surance man, declares : 

In the fall of 1892, in Sacramento, I had a severe 
attack of pleuro-pneumonia which resulted in a 
general state of debility and frequently recurring 
attacks of illness during the succeeding ten years, 
or until 1902, when I was persuaded to try Chris- 
tian Science. I had no faith in Christian Science 
but was prejudiced against what I thought it to be, 
which opinion I learned upon fair investigation to 
be wholly different from what the Science really is. 
At the time of turning to it as a healing agency I 
was in desperate straits physically, with bad heart 



IMPERIAL VALLEY 

You will buy lots in the town of 

HEBER 

next Fall. Why not now? 50 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 

Loftus &. Burnham Company, Inc. 
128 W. 6th St., Crosse Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




SHIRTS 

OUR 

SPECIALTY 

Many new novelties in Patterns 
and Colorings. Also a com- 
plete line of nobby Neckwear, 
Hosiery and Handkerchiefs to 
match. 

223W. Fifth St. Troy Laundry Company 




Be sure to see 

THE ?S DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Andirons— Grates— Fire Sets 

In Artistic Designs 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7,6:7, s 8 pH?n U g T Wt 



WfanyoutAtnfiof&eadlfiuitiaf 



For 




LarAnJf&es 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



kiil- 

stani 

,nd I had 

■int pain probably six months and 

hree months. Af- 

ce 1 slept 

morning tree from 
Withii time my kiili d t 

ic, my hear) action became normal. I laid 
then been a practi- 
cally well man. 1 owe my ndition wholly 
to thi Christian Science. 

Henry M. Xewmark. of the firm of Morgan & 

During the past five years I have depended solely 

in Science, and it lias proven a more 

n for healing disease than any other. 

I ha many diseases yield to its beneficent 

ministrations, within my own immediate family. 

licm chronic stomach and bowel trouble, 

soning, severe nervous headaches, la 
pe and fever, chronic constipation, rheumatism 

tica. 

Through the reading and study of the Christian 

nee text hook "Science and Health with Key 

to the Scriptures", by Mrs. Mary Maker G. Eddy, 

I have been enabled permanently to remove eye 

which I had been wearing for about two 
years. A most distressing and prolonged case of 
nasal catarrh disappeared in the same manner. 
Three well-known specialists had failed to cure me. 
I have always found Christian Science most prac- 
tical in its application to my daily problems, in 
business, thus solving questions of importance and 
at the same time very materially lightening my 
cares and responsibilities. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Can You Pronounce All? 

In addition to the words in common use printed 
in the Pacific Outlook August 1 and August 8 as 
liable to be mispronounced by many educated per- 
sons, the following- are presented. Some of these 
are pronounced in more than one way. How many 
of these can you pronounce, without referring rto 
the dictionary, according to the "preferred pro- 
nunciation", i. e., that adopted by the best authori- 
ties? 

Turbine. 

Subsidiary. 

National. 

Presbyter}'. 

Clique. 

Amenable. 



Acclimated. 

Hospital. 

Hospitable. 

Pergola. 

Wound. 

Deuce. 

Aggrandizement. Acumen. 

Prelude. Resource. 

Promiscuous. Advertisement. 

* * * 



Tenets. 
Basic. 

1 li piuogeneous. 

Amenities. 

Drama. 

( )fteu. 

Sulphurous. 

Contractor. 

Heterogeneous. 



Everything O. R.. 

By thk Optimist 

Let the howlers howl, 
And the growlers growl. 
And the prowlers prowl, 

And the gee-haws go it : 
Behind the night 
Thei e is plenty of light, 
And things are all right, 

And 

I KNOW IT. 



v, 



BUNGALOWS 

On installments 
Small Payment Lotvn 
Balance Monthly 

We can put you up a home in almost any part of 
the city from Boyle Heights to the Westlake Dis- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rein. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Harvey McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 

D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



b 
u 

s 
i 

N 

E 
S 
S 



PROPERTIES 



ran&erbill Sbirt Co. 



Mahers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SKirts 



Phone r 6715 



4*14- 1 ■ ScmtH Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets. . 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co.. Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 

ROBERT rIADISON, Sole Agent for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle {Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loans. Investments, 
Insurance 




GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

Real Estate 






Phone F 1468 




902 Security Bldg., Los Angeles 


Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 




, T IS undoubtedly true that the great ma- 
jority of the inhabitants of Los Angeles 
^jpHI^ have little conception of the rate at which 
manufacturing in this city has developed 
during 'the past three or four years, or its 
present status. While but a relatively short time 
since the local retail stores exhibited almost nothing 
in the line of the fruits of rich workmanship pro- 
duced in this city, at the present time the output of 
some of the Los Angeles factories established in re- 
cent years is occupying 'the place of honor in many 
a show-place. This city, though famed as a winter 




and summer resort, is rapidly approaching the time 
when it will be known as a manufacturing city also. 
The stability and solidity which will inevitably re- 
sult from 'the establishment of a large number of 
moderate-sized manufacturing plants is already in 
sight. Just what the relations of the manufacturers 
to the city at large will be depends almost exclusive- 
ly on two things — the integrity of the manufac- 
turers and the quality of their products, on the one 
hand, and the inclination of local consumers to re- 
ceive or reject what is offered to them by these pro- 
ducers, on the other. 

The Pacific Outlook has directed attention to 
several of these splendid indus'tries in the past. 
Last week it suggested, editorially, that "Los An- 
geles will never take rank among the prosperous 
manufacturing cities of the country until its in- 
habitan'ts themselves show their confidence in the 
manufacturers who have established industries here 
by demanding that the merchants shall keep the 
local output in the retail market, along with the 
product of foreign manufactories." 

To insure the permanency of industries of this 
greatly-desired class in this city every possible en- 
couragement should be offered them by home con- 
sumers. Especially should this'' encouragement be 
extended after it has been ascertained that the 
article "made in Los Angeles" is the equal of the 
foreign-made article. 

.During the past year J. R. Smurr of the Cass- 
Smurr Stove Company, who for more than thirty 
years has been prominently identified with the busi- 
'ness interests of Los Angeles, and who has become 
recognized as one of the most substantial men in the 



city, has associated himself with W. W. Wiles in 
the manufacture of brass bedsteads, etc., incorporat- 
ing under the name of the Wiles-Smurr Manufac- 
turing Company. Mr. Wiles, formerly of New 
York, has had many years' successful experience in 
the manufacture of high-grade Brass bedsteads. 
The combination of these two men, for promoting 
this particular industry, therefore has been an ideal 
one. 

At the corner of Los Angeles and Seventeenth 
streets this company erected a large brick building, 
which it equipped with the best and most modern 
machinery for manufacturing brass bedsteads. Al- 
though a relatively new enterprise, the product of 
this factory is in itself sufficient evidence of the 
fact that nowhere else in America are more beau- 
tiful, more artistic or more durable bedsteads made. 
None but materials of the finest quality are em- 
ployed. Every piece sent out from the factory is a 
specimen of what may be attained when perfection 
is aimed at. 

That the Wiles-Smurr Company might be influen- 
tial in making the slogan "Made in Los Angeles" 
mean something more than words, it has made sub- 
stantiality, durability and artistic finish three of the 
qualities .which must characterize every article 
leaving its warerooms. When it lacquers a bed- 
stead, for example, it employs lacquer which has 
stood the most severe tests. When it gives the 
"satin finish", the workmanship must be perfect. 
Every design must be new, especially attractive 
and, above all, artistic. Every workman is an ex- 
pert, performing his labor directly under the eye of 
Mr. Wiles. The result is that the perfection desired 




is attained, and that when the company gives its 
guarantee it knows that it will be able to "make 
good". This guarantee is to the effect that its out- 
put is "equal in design, finish and price to any 
manufactured in the United States." 

The bedsteads iturned out by this company, three 
of which are shown in the accompanying illustra- 
tions, are made of heavy brass tubing reinforced 
with a steel lining. They are rigid and it is im- 
possible to dent them or bend them out of shape, 
like ordinary beds made of thin brass tubing. Brass 
bedsteads must have a firm foundation if they are to 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



remain rigid. The pillar, angle and cornerpiece are 
her by the V : rr Company, mak- 

ing uction. 

A visit to the factory of this concern well repays 
one interested in the manufacture of furniture of 
this class. In the warerooms may be seen bedsteads 
. in the Bright, Satin and Polet 
finish. Nothing more beautiful in this line is to be 
anywhere in the United States, if, indeed, in the 
world. To see is to desire. 

If more people were familiar with the superior 
quality of t lie output of this manufacturing concern 
there would he an increased demand for this par- 
ticular brand of home product. Why buyers should 
articles made in another state or city, perhaps 
another country, when a superior article, made at 
home, can be procured for the same or even a lower 




price, is one of the mysteries characteristics of 
Americans. We believe it is safe to predict, how- 
ever, that well-considered efforts toward educating 
the people of Los Angeles in its manufactures will 
result in stimulating the local demand for home pro- 
ducts that are known to be the equal or ithe superior 
of the foreign-made articles. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Mr. Cleveland as a Writer 

There was once a rumor, started by some foolish 
person, that Mr. Cleveland did not prepare his own 
speeches and papers. Nothing could be farther from 
the truth, declares Henry van Dyke in the Review 
of Reviews for August. He prepared them im- 
mensely and intensely. No man knew better than 
he the danger of rash and exaggerated language. 
No man appreciated more fully the value and the 
power of the measured, direct telling phrase. The 
knowledge that he had to make a public address at 
a certain time, at least in his later years, gave him 
at' first a rather acute anxiety and discomfort. He 
was absurdly afraid of not doing the right thing. 
Then, as he toiled over it, the sense of what he 
really wanted to say, some large and simple thing 
that he thoroughly believed in, took possession of 
him and carried him along; and he uttered himself 
with a kind of serene earnestness and confidence 
that was convincing and uplifting to thoughtful 
hearers. But the point is that he did all his writing 
with his own pen, and his thinking with his own 
mind. I have seen many pages of that fine, firm, 
careful handwriting. It is as delicate as a woman's 
hand, but the vigor of a strong man, who knows 
what he intends, runs through every word and line. 



Women as 
Bond Buyers 



There are a few instances in American 
finance where women have entered into suc- 
cessful competition with men in large finan- 
cial transactions. These women invariably 
invested large amounts in municipal and 
collateral bonds, paying from 3% to 4 per 
cent per annum. 

It is seldom tbat the woman with moder- 
ate means is offered an opportunity to in- 
vest from $25.00 upwards in securities that 
are absolutely safe. 

Our Municipal Collateral Bond offers an 
especially attractive form of investment — 
absolutely secure and paying 6 per cent 
semi-annually. 



Further information at Columbia Trust 
Co., Trustees, 311 W. 3d St., 



Guarantors and Investment Co. 

403-409 Mason Opera House Bldg. 



M. 


NATH ANSON 

LADIES* TAILOR 


HABIT MARER 

t Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 

216 Mercantile Place 











oo 


■0M 


1 We 






| Pay 

Special 






Attention 
To 








*&imyr^^^ m ^^^S^^3U^!A\ys^ f ?^ty 


Our 




OPTICAL DEPAP/1 


rMENT 


In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



THE VOICE OF AUGUST 



By M. N. F. Bridgham 



Prologue 

VERILY this is a glorious old world, and strict- 
ly all right! How do I know? A barefooted 
urchin with happy eyes told me so. Over 
all the wide expanse of this, our summer-land, is 
spread the splendor of August, the blue of her sky' 
and the gold of her sunshine — and it is vacation 
time. Let us give thanks ! 

"Come away ! Come away !" whistle oriole, mock- 
ingbird and that ilk, clinging in ecstatic abandon 




Both Contented 

to the outermost wing of swaying pepper bough, 
and the heart of the child answers swift to the call. 
Down from the hills strays a resinous breath of 
spruce, pine and sweet fern, and in a moment young 
gipsy blood is pulsing madly and gipsy minds see 
visions of fleeing deer, of blazed trails leading to 
snowy peaks, of camp fires flaming against a dense 
background of pines 'neath a starry sky, of a fa- 
mous swimming pool, of a brown mountain brook 
rippling and murmuring over its pebbly bed, and 
of a certain spot where the shadow deepens under 
a rock — "Gee, was that a trout?" 

At a Mountain Ranch 

One of the chief joys of the ranch at Oakglen is 
that scrap of a grey burro, Maud, and her funny 
little burro-ette. Maud's prolonged, squeaky 
"Hee-haw, hee-ee-e h-a-a-w-er", is nothing less than 
music in the ears of both the twins, Ted and Helen, 
and Ted declares that Maud puts her black nose 
over the pasture bars each morning before sun-up, 
and calls, "Come o-u-t, c-c-o-m-e o-o-o-u-u-t-e-r-r". 

The cherries and apricots are gone long ago, ex- 
cept those delicious ones "done up" in glass jars 
on the store room shelves, but there is the apple 
orchard. 

Does some one ask, what is the fun in an apple 
orchard when the apples are not yet ripe? Well, 
if you don't know, you must have been born grown 
up !- For onething, children are not allowed in that 



orchard at this season of the year, and for another, 
it is quite possible for one to fall from the gnarled 
limbs and to break one's legs or ribs or even one's 
neck: and again, the fruit is immature and sour 
and hard and may make one ill, and that's the fun 
in an apple orchard. 

Beside, before the twins come home the middle 
of September, there itiay be some downy chicks — 
an old hen stole her nest last year and came off 
with a brood of eleven ! 

There's Jack, the hound, and all the cats and 
kittens — and the new kittens, and there are sure to 
be lots of little black pigs over in the lot across the 
road from the house ; there is a small creek running 
there, and last year Ted built a dam above which he 
maintained a fleet of a dozen warships throughout 
vacation. 

There can be no question as to the manifold at- 
tractions at Oakglen. There are lots of other -little 
people summering at the ranches all about, and life 
is one long joy. 

By the Deep Blue Sea 

Of a truth it is a glorious old world, and we are 
glad we are alive. Down at the shore it is vacation 
time also, and here an irrepressible tide of young 
humanity disputes day by day with Old Ocean for 
possession of the sparkling grey sands. 

The little people come singly, in files and in regi- 
ments ; they fairly swarm up and down the beaches, 
but there is always room for one more, and they 
are kissed impartially by sun and wind and spray 
until tanned to a uniform shade of beautiful reddisn 
brown. They build forts, plant sea gardens, and 




A Glorious Old World 

lay out race courses; they wade and bathe and 
gather shells and sea-weed. 

The happy waves of ebb-tide, receding noiseless- 
ly, leave unguarded treasures of shell and kelp on 
the damp floor, but soon the returning waves come 
in with thunderous surge, great combers break in 
wind-tossed foam, and the most venturesome ma- 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



raudi th screams of laugfiter to high water 

mark for safety. 

But then, who care*, and who's afraid? Isn't it 
■id vacation:- There is that great inverted 
blue overhead, there is the drenching sun- 
anil the hot sand; there are baby clouds drift- 
ing aimlessly here and there, and sea gulls -weep 
n in immense arcs to the face of the waters, 
touch the dancing waves at a tangent and then dirt 
the blue. 
There is fishing from the pier, from the row boats 
and from the yachts, with possible trips in a launch. 
There is music and merry-go-rounds and — oh! a 
hundred other joys, and to crown all such an ap- 
petite for three square meals a day as one never 
achieves elsewhere on this round earth. 

Vacation at Home 

But -peaking of vacations. 1 rather envy the 
happy stay-at-homes. Listen: 

"How do yon like to go up in a swing, 

l_'p in tlie air so blue? 
Oh. I do think it the pleasantest tiling 

Ever a child can do, 

"Up in the air and over the wall. 
Tiil I can see so wide." — 

The clear childish trchle ends abruptly with a 
small gasp, there is a dramatic pause, and propelled 




a playroom, the sv branches forming four 

green and leafy wall- that shut out the intrusive 
sun and admit welcome playmates only — such as 
mocking birds. I'.cr, \ is curious about the birds 
and fauna that are to be found in the green wihler- 
. and every day there is an outing that she may 
make the acquaintance of these new friends. 

Carrol's father owns a big orange ranch in San 
Bernardino county, and when the August run of 
water is on they are ;ill going down for a few d 
otherwise the time will lie spent at home. They 

will visit the different beaches and parks and make 
living trips to tin- mountains. There will be trolley 
rides and moonlight motor trips, a tent on the lawn 
with basket picnics, tea and cakes under the trees. 
and although there are only three children in this 
group there will lie noise and fun enough for a 
do/en. 

Epilogue 
When some master shall write the great Sym- 
phony of Vacation to which every heart must throb 
in response, surely over and above the murmur of 
brook and wind, past all suggestion of sun and sky 
and cloud, fragrance of flowers and song of bird, 
clearer than any minor motif of rest or peace, will 
be heard the laugh of a little child. 

Human Frailties 

"Why do womeni enjoy weeping at a matinee?" 
said he. 

"I don't know," answered she. "Why do men en- 
joy getting angry at the umpire?" — Denver News- 
Times. 



Kissed hv Sun and Wind and Spray 

by Uncle Dave's strong arms Carrol sweeps up and 
up "into the air so blue", and her tiny shoes strike 
full and square on the great bough of the live oak — 
a bough that hangs full twenty feet above the 
ground, and which she never before has been able 
to reach. 

Amid great applause from her audience the down- 
ward rush is made in elated silence, and another 
upward flight begun, while Brother Bob and 
cousin Bettv, who are in the hammock awaiting 
their turns, paraphrase enviously, 

"Up in the air she goes flying again, 
Up in the air and down." 

Uncle Dave and Betty live in Boston, and this is 
the small maiden's first visit to her California 
cousins, and great things are being planned. Rob 
and Carrol live close to the arroyo, the oak under 
which the hammock is swung growing quite to the 
edge, while half-way down the slope, and under an- 
other wide spreading oak is a platform as big as 
the floor of a good-sized room, which is utilized as 



Every Piece of Furniture, 
of Weathered Oak, Now 
on sale at a Reduction. 

The best and choicest furniture of this class in the 
city — our entire line — every piece at a special price 
now that makes a bargain in every case. 

Ip>s^n§eles furniture C°- 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH end SEVENTH STREETS 

Furniture. Carpets, Ruds. Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



DuBois <§_> Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

Rugs, Carpets A Hp f> /~\ Q r T~" 
Draperies /\ [ LU J 1 

Lace Curtains 



^ 



J. E. MEYER 

Stocha, Bonds and Investments 
Broker and Dealer in 

high grade: securities 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lummis gave a musicale 
Monday which was enjoyed by a large number of 
guests who profited by the moonlight It'o stroll in 
the picturesque grounds which surround the house. 
Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. 
Bent, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Way, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. 
Cole, Mrs. Norman St. Clair, C. O. Borg, Captain 
Amos A. Fries, Mr. and Mrs. Willoughby Rodman, 
Miss Olive Percival and some out-of-town visitors. 

A yachting party left San Pedro Sunday for a 
two weeks' sojourn at Catalina. It consisted of_ F. 
E. Wolfe, managing editor of the Herald, his wife, 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. Bryce Weaver of Louisville, 
Ky. ; Miss Mamie Louise Weaver, Miss Marguerite 
Ware, Frank H. Ware, Mrs. Reed, Mrs. Peebles, 
Mrs. Lucille James, Miss Elsie Owen, Miss Char- 
lotte Bailey, Miss Edith Osborne, Carl' Breer and 
Haines W. Reed. 

Members of the Tau Sigma sorority are passing 
a month at Long Beach, chaperoned by Mrs. Sturm 
and Mrs. Brooks. The party includes Misses Edith 
Sutherland, Beatrice Killifer, Bessie Morrison, Ada 
Parsons, May Phillips, Edytthe Shafer, Florence 
Wickersham, Mabel Wickersham and Emily Mc- 
Donald. 

M the fete given at Santa Monica last week in 
the garden of Major Scofield many attractive fea- 
tures gave variety to the fair. An amateur vaude- 
ville was a popular drawing card in the entertain- 
ment, during which Mrs. W. H. Anderson danced 
with remarkable skill one of the ancienlt Spanish 
dances. 

Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss 
Ruth Steere, daughter of Captain and Mrs. Henry 
Steere, to Captain William Wilkinson Reno of the 
medical department of the United States army.- The 
wedding will take place August 19th at Manila, 
Philippine Islands. 

Miss Clara Hudson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. 
H. Hudson of No.- 155 North Beaudry avenue, was 
married Tuesday evening to George R. Wood of the 
Union Oil Company, at the home of the bride's par- 
ents. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. 
A. B. Prichard. 

Mrs. Paul Pauley of Hollywood entertained 
Tuesday afternoon in honor of Miss Mary Widney, 
whose engagement to Sidney Reeve was recently 
announced. 

Mrs. Maud Davis Baker, her daughter, Miss 
Viroque Baker, and Miss Leah Schneider of Holly- 
wood have returned from a week's outing in the 
mountains. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of 
Miss Lulu Tryon, daughter of Mrs. Mary Tryon, 
and W. F. Martin of the United States Reclamation 
Service. 

The engagement of Miss Atelia Bedard, daughter 
of Mrs. A. L. Bedard, and J. J. McCue of the Ger- 
man-American Savings Bank has been announced. 

Mrs. J. P. Jones of Santa Monica opened her 
grounds Thursday for a concert in aid of St. Augus- 
tine by the Sea. The place was prettily lighted, af- 



fording a charming setting for the strolling com- 
pany. Miss Margery Brown was one of the singers. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Brown celebrated the fiftieth 
anniversary of their wedding at their home, No. 
1000 West Twenty-second street, Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Belt have returned from 
their wedding trip. They have taken up their resi- 
dence at No. 1610 South Union avenue. 

The wedding of Miss Julia Theresa Eberlein, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Eberlein, and Thom- 
as Mitchell Bridges, occurred August 12. 

The marriage of Miss Pearl May Palmer, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Taylor, and Oscar Sun- 
bury will (take place September 16. 

Mrs. Margaret Webb of Webb, Miss., and Mrs. 
Lucy Barbee of Warrensburg, Mo., are guests of 
Mrs. H. A. Slauter. 

Miss Laura Norton of Oakland Was guest of 
honor at a dinner given Tuesday evening by Mrs. 
Martin Bekins. 

The marriage of Miss Josephine Dunn and Frank 
G. Wagner was solemnized Tuesday evening. 

Mrs. E. Irving Rackett of Bloomington is the 
guest of friends in Hollywood. 

Major E. F. C. Klokke and his family are occupy- 
ing their cottage at Redondo. 

Mrs. Hiram Higgins is visiting in Iowa. 



<^Vi^i 




\ST: 



So.Broadway ^ft5*j|j^igffi* i T&£< So. Hill Street 
A. FUSENOT CO. 

Fall Dress Goods 



NEW CREAM 
WOOLENS 



We have just received our fall line of 
Cream Woolens. The assortment in- 
cludes sheer weights for evening wear, 
medium weights for street costumes, 
and heavy weights for outing suits for 
both men and women. Plain weaves, 
hair lines and self stripes are included 
in the assortment, which is the most 
complete we have ever shown. Prices 
range from 50c to $3.00 a yard. 






Pacific Outlook 



19 




"Masters of Men" 

The Burbank Theater furnished its patrons this 
k with a timely political drama with a better 
title than plot, lor the piece had the unfortunate — 
or perhaps we should say charitable — result of en- 
listing our sympathies for the corrupt boss rather 
than for the somewhat self-righteous district attor- 
ney. This inclination was partly owing, no doubt, 
to the excellent acting of Byron Beasley, who por- 
trayed the masterful politician endowed with a pur- 
pose and who was game as well as resourceful in 
his villainous schemes. Mr. Desmond had a trying 
part in the role of (the attorney. 

An unusual feature of the performance was de- 
veloped in the third act. Buntz, "The Boss", plans 
to ruin the attorney, Clark, by forcing him to sign 
a compromising letter. Clark drops the letter on 
the floor in such a way that Buntz is obliged to 
stoop, when he is seized by Clark. A struggle en- 
sues ; the lamp is overturned. Darkness and agitat- 
ing music intervene and light again reveals Clark 
and Buntz wrestling on a balcony which overlooks 
the pit, while a mob of enlightened, banner-carry- 
ing and noble citizens rush from the back and fill 
the aisles. One's love of a safe row is stirred into 
expectation by ithis well-prearranged rumpus. One 
hopes to see Buntz landed on the head of the or- 
chestra leader. Nothing of the sort happens. O, 
bathos! The emotions of the aroused spectators 
are immediately soused in the cooling platitudes of 
a political speech, containing references to the 
Declaration of Independence, to Bunker Hill, and 
to Santiago. Mr. Desmond did his best. The can- 
did spectators only felt like saying "Bunker Hill be 
blowed". Politics makes poor stuff on the mimic 
stage, possibly because the two deceptions have 
much in common. 

H. J. Ginn as Davis seemed familiar and neigh- 
borly. He mirrored the man we most of us affect 
to despise and of whom we are two-thirds made, 
posing virtues outside our orbits of selfishness. 
Blanche Hall as Dorothy filled a graceful role some- 
what petulantly, and Katherine Kirkwood failed to 
put much warmth into the character of the aban- 
doned mother. Louise Royce was a good negro 
nurse. The other parts were slight. Elsie Esmond 
played the sister Jessie with her usual breezy dash. 
"Masters of Men" was written by Avery Hopwood. 



"The Wife" 

The thread of plot which runs through "The 
Wife" is of the slightest and it is overlaid with so 
many details of other episodes that the play is over- 
long and seems a little cumbersome in parts. The 
Belasco company, however, made the most of its 
opportunities in ithe various scenes. Helen Tru- 
man has a girlish fancy for Robert Grey, but in a 



moment of pique and youthful despair she accepts 
and marries, with her father's consent, John Ruther- 
ford, a senator of the United States, who is older by 
a number of years than herself. In the third act he 
learns that she had previously loved Grey, and in 
the fourth she finds out that she really loves her 
husband. This is all very well, but it takes an un- 
due amount of time to settle and the delay is only 
made acceptable to the spectators by the brighter 
aspects of the love affairs of two other couples, the 
elderly courtship of an old major and a Mrs. Ives, 
and that of a young college student and her daugh- 
ter. Neither Hobart Bosworth as Rutherford nor 
Miss Grey as Helen had very grateful or pleasing 
roles to fill. The threatened tragedy of their lives 
was rather homespun and it was a relief when the 
curtain fell on their Indian summer bliss. 

Jaques Kruger as Major Putnam filled an excel- 
lent part with skill and sympathetically, and the 
happy termination of his protracted pursuit of Mrs. 
Ives's heart was the most enjoyable part of the 
play. Miss Carey as Mrs. Ives was charming, as 
this gifted and sincere artist generally is. Harry 
Glazier as the unscrupulous lawyer carried the bur- 
den of villainy, and Mr. Vivian as Grey made a 
staunch figure as lover and man of honor. Charles 
Ruggles and Dorothy Bernard were amusing as boy 
and girl lovers, especially in the smoked glass scene, 
where ithey blacken a piece of glass over a candle in 
order to observe a coming eclipse. The play is 
knowingly constructed rather than highly conceived, 
and while containing two or three good characters, 
leaves the spectator moderately indifferent as to the 
fate of the central figures. 

DON. 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zbe Starr piano Co, 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



Now It's Rawhide, Nevada 

Funny, isn't it? Here all of us had just settled down satisfied that the wonderful camps at Tonopah, Gold- 
field, Bullfrog, and Beatty would maintain Nevada's nam'e for richness and quantity of gold produced when 
along comes a cowboy miner named Charley Holman, and produces Rawhide. It is not necessary— is it — 
to repeat that Rawhide, in proportion to its growth, is duplicating the other rich camps of Nevada — and 
more. Rawhide stands today the wonder gold mining canup of the world, and still i.t is in the cocoon state 

of development. The 
Los Angeles Ex- 




•'>.^j5!h^M^ 



press recently an- 
nounced : 

Rawhide Ship- 
ments Increase 
More ore is being 
shipped out of Raw- 
hide at the present 
time than at any 
period in the his- 
tory of that camp, 
Wednesday -two 

tons were shipped 
from the Jordan 
lease of the Queen 
Mascot. Thirty tons 
are >en route from 
the Grutt Hill mint. 
The Western Ore 
Purchasing company 
of Hazen is sam- 
pling- 300 sacks of 
high grade just re- 
ceived* from . the 
Czar lease on the 
Regent Mining com- 
pany's property, and 
there are 200 sacks 

more on the dump at the Czar ready for sacking and shipment. The McKinley lease on the same property 
has just shipped 115 sacks. 

The accompanying illustration shows a hoist being installed on the Rawhide King Hill Mining Com- 
pany's Coalition lease. The hoist is the Western type and was shipped from Los Angeles. With the hoist 
in operation the work of opening the mine and getting it in shape for production will be greatly facilitated, 
The shaft which is a little over 130 feet deep is to be continued to the 300 foot level where a station will 
be cut and a cross cut driven to open the rich vein of ore proved up at a depth of 65 feet. With the present 
plan of development consummated the King Hill will become one of the steady producers of high grade 
milling ore in Rawhide. 

The accompanying illustration serves to show what the King Hill hasn't done more than what it has 
done. Plenty of ore is at hand. What we want is money to help get it out. If we had the money ourselves 
we wouldn't ask for any. All our money is in this mine and lease, and we are glad of it. 

The public now-a-days is demanding results. The era of the promoter with the red vest and diamond 
solitaire and "mining claim" is passing. The Rawhide King Hill Mining Company is getting results, and 
will continue to get results for every dollar invested with it. 

The property is located on Silver King hill, inside of the city limits of Rawhide, and comprises a part 
of the coalition's purchase, right in the center of the proven district. The company is operating on three 
blocks of 300 feet square each, nearly seven acres. There are rich stringers of ore all the way down the shaft, 
and the entire dump of about 200 tons is all millable ore. 

At 65 feet in the cross-cut a seven foot quartz ledge was opened up that gave values of from $12 to 
$1,000 per ton, which will average about $100 per ,ton. Picked samples run up in the thousands. 

This company also owns claim Mohawk No. 1, of 20 acres, just back of Balloon hill, and adjoining the 
famous Jordan lease which recently sold for $25,000. No work is being done on this claim yet but leasers 
will he put to work on it soon. Jt is believed to he very rich and will become a big producei. 

This company is officered by experienced mining men, who are on the ground giving their personal 
attention to the supervision of the work now being done. L. W. Klinker, President. J. E. Burney, Vice- 
President, E. C. Klinker, Secretary and Manager, C. J. Klinker, Treasurer and Mine Superintendent. 

Capital stock $1,000,000 divided into 1,000,000 shares, par value $1. 400,000 shares Treasury stock to be 
sold for developing and operating purposes as needed. Only 50,000 shares now on sale at 30 cents a share. 
The company reserves right to advance price without notice. iStock will be issued as orders are received. 
In event of oversubscription of this allotment money will be refunded. The recent rich strike on the Grutt Hill 
Mint adjoins us on the north and is on the same claim. For further information call on or address 

J. E. MEYER, Pacific Savings Bank 

202 Mercantile Place Los Angeles, Cal. 









Pacific Outlook 



21 



Unwalled Gardens 

II V v 

It ial relations from 

a large and nai view. It often dispels 

onfer on one that 

mity ami 
Even trivial mat- 
in wth significance when inter- 
nally. The toothache, when 
reverberation of the stars, is poignant, 
. if it is - i as a rythmic 

harmony of \ Mars. The industrious and 

thy citizen is apt to become parochial unless 
illy reminded that the persistence and 
identity of his il force may he the weakest 

link in tie chain of the universe. 

The Counselor wisl ,'lain in a few words 

the difference between the European and the Ameri- 
can idea's a- to what a front yard should be, as well 
as the sanctity of the half-acre in the rear. In Eu- 
lecially in Southern latitudes, as well, in a 
' measure, as in England, it is customary to 
wall in the family domain by means of a high barri- 
iping the casual glance of the strolling 
Strian. This practice has many advantages. It 
ially imprisons the family disputes, those neces- 
sarily frequent attempts to achieve consanguineal 
rd: it screens the tattered garb of the clothes- 
line, and intimate economies of an ancienit nighty, 
and furthermore, it safeguards the emotional effu- 
sii n of a parting connubial kiss from the comment 
of a derisive whistle from the ubiquitous and scorn- 
ful coster, celibate or of shattered experience. 
The chaste, although microbe-ridden, salute be- 
en man and his skirted counterpart is reported 
to be a more satisfactory emolument when free from 
ithe mocking "ha-ha" of a witness. Sequestered ap- 
provals are apparently consoling. This kind of con- 
solation is denied the American. His private en- 
dearments must always find their consummation 
within the limited confines of plastered walls or, 
stealthier he, perhaps on the breezier screen porch. 
rhe American cannot enjoy the expansion of an 
open air salutation — at least not one from a shrink- 
ing lady. A walled garden permits of surreptitious 
joys, bounded by the sky alone. It encourages un- 
flenicd affections in conformity with nature's disre- 
gard of sportive processes. Our open display of 
lawn and of flower tangles makes love a furtive and 
secretive bitterness. This difference in horticul- 
tural ideals is probably due to the fact that the Eu- 
ropean may safely browbeat his wife, while a har- 
rassed American dares not do so, even for her un- 
doubted good. 

A woman whom man can bully is so much more 
useful than one whom he cannot "fudge-fudge" into 
slavery. A man does not like to be confined by 
the walls of waspish criticism, however merited. A 
sophisticated wife of the Yankee variety needs 
space. Like an anarchist's bomb, she wants room to 
explode, and her trousered subjects naturally pro- 
vide as many avenues of escape as possible. A 
detriment to flight is abhorred. The serenity of 
feminine submission is unknown and unpopular. 
A man only walls up a wife he really likes. Wire 
netting is [the symbol of our affinities. Even barbed 
wdre is going out. Skedaddle is the password to 
office — by express lift. Besides, you cannot recon- 
noitre a stone wall. "Where is she"? Sing the 




T 



Is a California product — made especially for the 
housewift. It's a cleanser for the home and is 
adapted to use on 

Iron 

Steel 

Brass 

Copper v 

Windows 

Woodwork 

and Porcelain Ware 

USE-IT 

T5i AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
COMPANY, Ltd. 

LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE 1908 
MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




(■Writing in Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bail-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of S ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typebar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and' without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — .Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



bramble bush! Praise the broken hedge! What is 
home without an ally? 

Trust your fellows. Where thieves may enter 
lords may skip. Work is the best refuge from 
tyranny and undivided lawns man's only security, 
contiguous battlefields leading to freedom. Pergola 
fences offer loopholes for jumping, exits like the 
perforated paper hoops through which the dazzling 
acrobat hops joyfully again ito the back of his flee- 
ing steed. 

The primitive American had a wilderness on his 
right hand and on his left. The best' the modern 
man can do is to go .fenceless, sprawling in his 
neighbor's yard, soliciting succor and mingling 
agonies. 

* * * 

Scraps of Esoteric Common-sense 
By an Interrupted Hero 

Laughter is the derisive form of inertia which 
makes man think he is doing something. There 
never was a giggling taskmaster. 

The only use most people make of a piece of new 
information is to worry about it. 

Few men could stand a new experience every day 
as a vagabond can. Therefore they build houses 
and creeds to simmer in their old ideas, thoughtful 
dyspeptics of mush and milk. 

A drunkard is a man who fears his clearest vision, 
frightened by opportunity. He is timid before his 
chances and reels to a sodden failure. 

The reverberations of sanity are the only mad- 
dening things in the world. We can forgive folly 
and even pay for it ; but righteousness and wisdom 
are free and tasteless and exceedingly dull company. 

We should be as reticent about our bowels as 
about our souls. 

A woman's waist should be ample without abund- 
ant. . 

Few men are interested in precisions, and no 
women. It is the inexact which makes us laugh. 

To be intolerable to others is a sign of growth. 

A voiceless passion consummated in silence is 
the most ignoble of all vices. 

It is our pleasures which destroy our interest in 
life. 

A collector is merely a repository for accom- 
plished facts. He stratifies achievement and 
fossilizes effort, uselessly ticketing the deeds of 
other men. 

Sentiment is respect for decay. 

The reason the French are so delightful to live 
with is because they take it for granted that you 
are ever trying to deceive some one, which is prob- 
ably itrue. 

AVomen are lovable only in proportion as they 
may be deceived. 

The comedy of life is making a woman believe 
that you are telling the truth ; the tragedy is failure 
in the tactful purpose. 

There are other ways of asking a question besides 

interrogation. Truth stampedes before inquisition, 

but falls, as in a trap, before an alert sympathy, 

captured by a compelling silence. 

<i ♦ ♦ 

Woman's Way 

She — Taxes wouldn't be so high if we women 
were in charge of the city's affairs. He — I'll war- 
rant the poll tax wouldn't. You'd have it marked 
clown from $2 to $1.98. — New York Evening Post. 




f".'tM;Va<,,7,,v7 




Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



^ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 



Pacific Outlook 




A WA 



Don't Get Behind the Mop 

ii e day 
Icctu n the value in life of initiative 

lint," he s . 
m of a nc . r city. She 

much refinement. Owing in family 
woman of 
nt but her malady ch 

i witl 
her ears had e\ en mrse 

with Vl the asylum they cured her of cursing 

piece of chalk 

it and c\ erywhere on 

furniture. One day a visitor to d where she 

was the attendant in her presence what 

■ lie matter with her, as she app a woman 

of unusual intelligence. The atl led and con- 

"We ' llow her everywhere with a mop to 

emies which she writi 
"Yes," chimed in the insane patient, "but I keep two 

' — ■ — s' and three ' s' ahead of the mop." 

"Gentlemen," concluded the wise professor, "let me 
advise you always to keep ahead of the mop." 
* * * 
A Tickler 
See if you can punctuate the following sentence. The 
words appear in the proper order. All that is necessary 
is to mark in the proper punctuation marks: 
It was and I said not or 

• .♦ • 
So Easy 

"Can you tell me what this is, papa?" asked a little 
Westlake girl of her parent the other evening. She 
handed him a bit of paper on which he found inscribed 
the following: 


bed ^ 

After puzzling over the mysterious combination of let- 
ters papa "gave it up." 

"Oh, that's easy," explained the little miss. "I'm sur- 
prised at you. papa. Why, can't you s.ee? It's a little 
darkey — a dark 'e' — in 'bed' with 'nothing' over him." 

* + * 
Danger Signal 



©IF HUMOR 




"Stop the auto." "But, sir " "I think I saw some 

red ferns." "Better lemme keep on, boss," advised the 
chauffeur, earnestly. "Them red ferns is the local con- 
stable's whiskers." — Washington Herald. 

* * * 
Orthographically Dead 

Victor Noir. an illiterate bully of the press in the time 
of the Second Empire, once challenged a statesman of 
France to fight a duel. Noir was a densely ignorant man, 
and nearly every word in the challenge was misspelled. 
The statesman responded with the following letter: 

"Dear Sir — You have called me out without any .good 
reason; I have therefore, the choice of weapons. I choose 
the spelling book, and you are a dead man." 

The duel was never fought. 

The Customary Place 

A well known English bishop some time since lost his 
third wife. A clergyman who had known the first wife 
returned from Africa and wanted to see the grave. He 
called at the cathedral and saw the verger. 
"Can you tell me where the bishop's wife is buried?" 
"Well, sir," replied the verger, "I don't know for cer- 
tain, but he mostly buries 'em at Brompton." — Cleveland 
Leader. 

* * * 
Unimportant 

Golfer — Will you come round again tomorrow? 
Second Enthusiast — Dunno. I'd arranged to get married 
tomorrow. Perhaps I can postpone it. — Tatler. 



His Intention 

iful young 
in a whirlwind 

like a whirlwind to fill pi 
my d to bi 
nemii like chaff fron 

* * + 

At the Usual Commission 
"The In oker couldn'l sell my stock." 
"Too bad, Jane." 

"I >. he made it all right Exchanged it for other securi- 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 

* * * 
Not a Necessity 

Like mos.t minister's families, they were not extensively 
Messed with this world's goods. She, however, was the 
youngest of ten children until her father explained to her 
of the baby sister who had just conne in the night. "Well," 
she said, after due thought. "I 'pose it's all right, papa, 
but there's, many a thing we needed worse." 

How He Learned 

Kind Lady — .My poor man, how did you ever accustom 
yourself to such long walks? 

Frayed Fagan — Please, mum, I used to own an automo- 
bile. — Chicago News. 

Couldn't Fool Him 

Baseball is a chronic complaint of Senator 'Crane. When 
he was governor of .Massachusetts he took his .entire staff 
out for a drive, and surprised them by having the rigs 
pull up at an open field and announcing that there was to 
be a baseball game. Two nines were chosen and the 
game began. Pretty soon somebody came along the 
road. "What teams are they?" he asked of one of the 
drivers. "Why, that man pitching is the governor of 
. Massachusetts," the driver replied. "The one catching is 
the lieutenant-governor. The first baseman is a congress- 
man, the second, baseman is the judge-advocate-general." 
"Say," interrupted the passer-by, "perhaps you would like 
to know who I am. I'm Napoleon Bonaparte.' ' 

* * * 

Had Never Quarreled 
When the forest-haunting hermit Thoreau lay on his 
death-bed. a Calvinistic friend called to make inquiry re- 
garding his soul. "Henry," he said, anxiously, "have you 
made your peace with God?" "Jo>hn," replied the dying 
naturalist, in a whisper, "I didn't know that God and my- 
self 'had quarreled!" 

* ♦ * 
In Days of Old 

"You used to travel a great deal, Senator Brown." 
"Yes," answered the great man regretfully; "that was my 
pass-time." — Judge. 

* * * 
Rough on the Babv 

An advertisement of a nursing .bottle printed in a Cana- 
dian newspaper concluded with the following: "When 
the baby is done drinking it must be unscrewed and laid 
in a cool place under a tap. If the baby does not thrive 
on fresh milk, it should be boiled." 

* * 4" 

A United Family 

An old couple in Glasgow were in a very depressed 
state owing to dull trade. 

Thinking their son in America would help them, they 
wrote, stating their trouble, and that if he did not help 
them) they would have to go to the poor 'house. 

Three weeks passed, rind then came a letter from their 
son saying: 

"Dear Mither and Father — Just wait anither fortnicht 
an' I'll come liame an' gang w i' ye. Your affectionate 
son." — San Francisco Bulletin. 



' 



<JThe BARTLETT MUSIC CO. 

is the Largest >r A usive Piano House 
in the Pacific Southwest and the 
A. B. Chase is its Leader. 

<JThe BARTLETT MUSIC CO. 

is the Oldest Music House in Los 
Angeles, having been Established in 
1875—over 33 years of continuous 
and successful business. 

CJThe BARTLETT MUSIC CO. 

has a reputation to sustain, not to 
make—It is known by every man, 
woman and child in the seven south- 
ern counties. 

qThe BARTLETT MUSIC CO. 

occupies the best location in the city, 
in the Blanchard Building between 
the Boston and Coulter Dry Goods 
Stores, just opposite the City Hall. 



UMI- 




:c®ot»©e 



^ Southwestern Weekly 



George Baker Anderson 
COlTON 



H. C. Jickerly 

PRESIDENT 



Published every Saturday 
LlSMnmr Build ng, Lom Angeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price SQ.OOa ymar In advance. Single copy S 
cents en all new* stands. 

Bnierci ■■■rcond-cliu matter April f, 1007, at the poitoffice at Lot Angelei, 
California, under tbe act of Congreti of March J, 1879. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 
The Pti. III.- Outlook I- 1n11il.1l to NUbNcrlhriM through the 
I, oh AncilrH I'iinI Office every Friday, n ml n lion Id be de- 
livered In every port of tlje elty by Saturday's pont. If for 
nny reonon It nlionld be detnyed, or be delivered In poor 
condition, Huhncrlhern nil! confer a favor upon tbe publlnher* 
by giving? them Immediate notlee. 

Vol. 5 Los Jrngeles, CaL, August 22, I908 Mo. S 

1 A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

J Would you make brothers of the poor by giving 
to them? 
(J Try it, and find that in a world of unequals it is 
the most unbrotherly of acts. 

There is no gulf between unequal men so wide as 
a gift; 

There is no wall so impassable as money given 
and taken; 



8 


9 'mere is notmng so untraternai as tne i 
the very symbol of discord and division. 
s Make brothers of the poor if you will 

ill 



There is nothing so unfraternal as the dollar: it is 

".ivision. 
you will, but do it 



poor 
by ceasing to steal from them. 
Charity separates: justice unites. 

— Ernest Crosby 



PARTICULAR NOTICE 
G>6e Pacific OutlooK's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial ; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or locai interest. 



COMMENT 



By George Baker Anderson 

WALTER F. X. PARKER still rules as the un- 
crowned Czar of Los Angeles county! William F. 
Herrin still holds dominion over the chief tax pro- 
vince of the Southern Pacific railroad ! God save 
the State! — The mailed fist of the corporation auto- 
crat has fallen with renewed violence upon the Re- 
publican party in California. The machine bosses, 
with and by the consent, encouragement and ma- 
terial assistance of the majority in the party, have 
spat once more upon the organization, and have 
then rubbed it in. They not only have whipped the 



dissenters into line, bul they have brazenly Forced 

upon them a written, signed ami sealed 

God Save pledge to support the county candi- 

the State! dates selected by BOSS Parker to do 
the bidding of the hitter's master, the 
I lemocratic proprietor of the Republican party in 
California. In spile of the roar of warning raised 
by those who would have saved the state for the 
people, the machine adherents, in a frenzy born of 
another victory in the face of the opposition of the 
champions of popular government, have forged new 
and — so they believe — stronger fetters upon the 
wrists of those who have been struggling to liberate 
the party from its enslavement to corporate greed. 
— Walter F. X. Parker still rules as the uncrowned 
Czar of Los Angeles county! William F. Herrin 
still holds dominion over the chief tax province of 
the Southern Pacific railroad! GOD SAVE THE 
STATE ! 

♦ ♦ • 

DO YOU REMEMBER the story of the trials 
and tribulations of the land of Egypt in the days of 
old? Do you remember reading of the plagues tnat 
were visited upon the inhabitants of that land — the 
frogs, the lice, the flies, the grievous murrain upon 
the domestic animals, the blighting hail and fire, the 

locusts, the darkness which was 

Stand Fast felt, the death of all the first-born 

Without Fear — and the four hundred and thirty 

years of bondage? Four hundred 
and thirty years ! Already has California been in 
bondage to the Southern Pacific political cabal for 
thirty years. Must California, like Israel, remain 
in bondage four hundred years more? No! There 
was a God in Israel, even as there is a God in Cali- 
fornia ; and the same God that delivered Israel from 
bondage will deliver California. Justice, integrity 
and honor have nothing to fear from diabolism ! 

♦ ♦ • ♦ 

There are degrees in government as well as in character. 
To apply the forms of government of a highly polished 
race to the savage is as foolish as to give his dusky spouse 
a powder puff. 

+ * + 

UNTIL quite recently — less than a month ago — 
the great majority of American citizens were 
joyously ignorant of the fact that a deep plot was 
afoot to convert this realm of the brave and domicile 
of the free into a monarchy, and that' a queen had 
already been selected as scepter-wielder extraordi- 
nary. By means of an advertisement published in a 

London daily about three weeks ago the 

Help British public were let into the secret 

Wanted which ought, in all fairness, to have been 

made public for the first time in America. 
Here is the advertisement, which is reported to have 
appeared under the general heading. "Help Want- 
ed" : "The Royalists of the United States, organized 
for the purpose of securing Real Liberty and to 
crown Helen of New York Queen, desire the help 
of the Royalists of the World, who can place our 



4 



Pacific Outlook 



cause before their respective Sovereigns, and secure 
their practical support." At the bottom of the "ad." 
was the name of Louis A. Gourdain. 

* * * 

LOUIS — how royal a name in itself! — told the 
newspaper men who besieged his rooms in the hotel 
that Queen Helen of New York was not to be 
crowned without a struggle, by comparison with 
which that in which the other Helen, she of Troy 
(not Troy, N. Y.), figured once upon a time was 
decidedly tame. He was certain, he said, being the 
possessor of "inside information", that along with 
the coronation would come a great war between 
the nations supporting the monarchical system of 
government and the republics of the western world, 
the result of which would be the com- 
An Eye plete overthrow of the President of the 
Opener United States and "all others in author- 
ity" in this altogether too progressive 
country. Ever since 1903, declares Louis, the 
American royalists have maintained a secret organi- 
zation in the United States, with the ultimate 
object of converting the republic into a kingly 
realm, incidentally making the market value of our 
government bonds bear the appearance of a thirty- 
cent piece. The eye-opening statement is made that 
this new party controls three million votes. The 
"supreme council" sits in Chicago, and "President 
Roosevelt is truly a monarch at heart, but like Julius 
Caesar" (pronounced Kiser) "puts away the crown 
because of expediency." 

* * * 

ALAS and alack ! And likewise aha ! Here is 
the why and the wherefore: Monarchy with Helen 
of Tr — of New York, rather, as Queen, is the only 
method by which socialism in America may be suc- 
cessfully combatted. The people are tired of the 
so-called democracy. They hunger and thirst after 
real g-overnment. They want to be governed, not 

left to shift for themselves, like some poor 
Call to helpless derelict upon the sea of politics 
Arms or the man who professes to be "in the 

hands of his friends". It is either a mon- 
archy or socialism, and in the end anarchism. And 
this is to be foisted upon us before the expiration 
of three years ! Judge Taft evidently has strenuous 
times ahead of him. Let every patriotic American 
citizen rouse himself to the menace that confronts 
him. Let him watch the by-wavs and the hedges 
and 'sdeath to every lurking monarchist. The coun- 
try, must be saved, come what may. 

* ♦ ♦ 

If California wants a trade-mark that signifies some- 
thing, permit us to suggest a juggernaut with Herrin con- 
trolling the motive power, or a State Constitution rolled 
and twisted in the shape of a cuspidor. Either will be 
quite appropriate. 

* * * 

TWO PSYCHOLOGISTS, Dr. Swoboda of the 
Vienna University and Christian Claussen of Chris- 
tiana, Norway, have been studying the human mem- 
ory in the hope of gaining exact knowledge regard- 
ing its periodical variations, They have found that 
thought-life appears to show a wave-like motion, 
that ideas and impressions are apt to recur at regu- 
lar intervals, like vibrations or waves. In other 
words, at the expiration of specified periods of time 
ideas and impressions are revived by memory — 
elevated from subconscious into conscious exist- 



ence. The approximate length of these periods was 
first ascertained by Dr. Swoboda and 
Recurrence afterward verified by Mr. Claussen. 
of Memory The Vienna scientist observed that 
"for some time after a concerthe found 
it impossible to recall any of the melodies, but these 
would invariably come into his mind a day or two 
later." A melody once heard was revived in' the 
memory of Dr. Swoboda at the end of twenty-three 
hours and again at the end of forty-six hours. This 
led him to establish a period of twenty-three hours, 
or multiples of twenty-three hours, for phenomena 
of this character. In the case of a woman stung by 
a bee the pain, after disappearing, reappeared 
twenty-three hours later. Further observation 
showed him that periods of eighteen hours were more 
common among women and periods of twenty-three 
hours among men. 

* * * 

ANOTHER SET of periods of longer duration 
was finally discovered and verified. These showed 
that the time was sometimes extended to twenty- 
three days in men and twenty-eight days in women. 
Not only visual and auditory impressions, but also 
moods and emotions, were revived. Dreams were 
found to recur in the some way. The Norwegian 
investigator relates the following: "I was awakened 
one night by the ticking of my alarm clock, which 
sound apparently had just caused me to dream that I 
was attending a concert. At this concert I read the 
name of a theretofore unknown composer on the 
programme. This name I remem- 
How. It Is bered now having read in the address 
Revived on a letter the day before, amd recall- 
ing the exact hour at which I had seen 
the name, I added eighteen hours and came in that 
way to the conclusion that it must be about three 
o'clock in the morning. Striking a match, I soon 
made sure that I had figured out the time almost to 
the minute. That the same dream may occur sev- 
eral nights in succession, or that two persons may 
have the same dream at the same time, finds its ex- 
planation in a similar way. Dr. Swoboda mentions 
the instance of two sisters who watched together 
one night at the bedside of their sick father. On 
the same night, twenty-eight days later, both of 
them dreamt that their father was dead and that 
they sat together weeping at his death-bed." 

* • * * 

IT IS the belief of Dr. Claussen that this kind of 
periodicity does not manifest itself to the same ex- 
tent in all persons. He divides men into two classes, 
periodical and aperiodical. The former includes, as 
a rule, those whose lives are strongly emotional or 
spiritual — poets, artists, etc. The second class em- 
braces practical, sober-minded persons, who exhibit 
little or no periodicity. That the knowledge gained 

by these men may be' used to 
How to Apply tremendous advantage none will 
the Knowledge dispute. It likewise may prove 

most annoying, as in the case of 
one whose ability to concentrate his mind on any 
particular subject is limited or hampered by strong- 
ly marked periodicity. Important tasks where the 
employment of facts which have once been strongly 
impressed upon the memory is necessary, if under- 
taken during the period of recurrence of the ideas 
or memory of what has been learned, will be more 



Pacific Outlook 



ledge made public 
be of incalculable 
value tn students, writers a speakers, in par- 
ticular. 

♦ ♦ + 

It is more wholesome to drink an infusion of strong tea 
than to imbibe distilled water which is impregnated with 
debilitating fears. 

+ + + 

THE RECENT outbreak m the capital of the 
linois. though it lias been dignified by the 
name of "race war", should not be regarded as an 
indication of any particular characteristic of the 
people of thai state, one of the most enlightened and 
ire in the Union. What has happened in 
Springfield is the outcome of mob frenzy. It is just 
as liable to happen in one city as another, li o 
curred during "dog days", when men who have not 

learned to curb their passions are less 

Dog-days responsible than at almost any other 

Frenzy time of the year. It is a part of human 

nature to resent and seek arbitrarily 
and summarily to punish heinous offenses against 
the individual. There was a time when practically 
all the crimes committed by members of the black 
race were chargeable to the Southern States. In 
recent years this class of crimes has become almost 
as numerous in the Xorthern a.s in the Southern 
States. While it is true, perhaps, that in most in- 
stances the offenders thus summarily punished have 
been negroes, retribution would have been as swift 
and as sure if the criminals had been whites. 

* + * 
SPRINGFIELD. Ills., for many years the home 

of the Great Emancipator, has always treated the 
negro citizen with great consideration. Among 
the better element of Springfield's colored men- there 
has been a disposition to take the initiative in curb- 
ing anything which has borne the appearance of evil 
arising out of controversy between the whites and 
the blacks. In the absence of such a gross outrage 
as that described by the telegraphic despatches from 
Springfield as the direct cause of the recent out- 
break, it is hardly likely that any serious differences 
between the white mob and the black mob would 

have arisen. And if the delays and in- 
What It efficiencies of the law had not been cited 
Teaches by some white fool — himself a greater 

criminal than the average member of the 
negro mob — the chances of violence would have 
been almost none at all. Back of every anti-negro 
demonstration will be found some blatant rascal, a 
more fitting victim of mob violence, if mob violence 
must ensue, than the negroes against whom he 
would see the whites in action. The existing rela- 
tions between the whites and the blacks in Ameri- 
ca are irremediable, in all probability; but the danger 
of permitting the development of further unneces- 
sary antagonism (between the white and the yellow 
races in America) is so great and the remedy now 
relatively so easy that the recent lesson .in the 
Springfield incident should be taken to heart. 

People are more bound together by their imbecilities 
than by peckfuls of wise conduct. 

+ ♦ + 

THE SLANDERER is the meanest, the most 
utterly contemptible of beings. No maw is safe 
from the malicious shafts dispatched by an irre- 
sponsible enemy. Perhaps the most insidious and 



meanest form of slandci is that which assumes the 
form of innuendo. v put up a pretty g 

tight in the Open, when the accusations mad. 
direct and Specific; but the indirect method, the 
question SO veiled as to impugn a man's integrity 
without violating a statute— this is the most coward- 
ly, the most hideous of .ill forms of attack. It was 
Solomon, we believe, who declared: "It is the glory 
of a man to pass by an offense." But how many 
men are able to rise to the dignity of passing bj all 
against their persons or 
Slander ["o err is human, 

and Revenge to forgive divine. Bui how many 
aspire h i attain near tlie divine by 

forgiving those who assail their personal honor? it 
is but human, and one of the almost wholly irre- 
sistible impulses actuating mankind, to resent to 
the uttermost ,,f one capabilities slanderous attacks 
aimed at one's personal honor. But in casting out 
the spirit .if revenge for an injury of this class, one 
rises immeasurably superior to the author of the 
calumny. Base and crafty cowards, occupying posi- 
tions which they deem impregnable, are like the ar- 
rows that rly in the .lark; but he who, stung by such 
a shaft in its flight, hurt to the quick, studies how to 
revenge himself, keeps his own wounds fresh. Let 
such bear in mind the adage: "Vindictive persons 
live the life of witches, who, as they are mischievous, 
so end they unfortunate." 

+ * + 

It is always the most effeminate men who wear the most 
robust hats. 

* * + 

THE PRIMARY campaign was of a character to 
be responsible for many an echo. Perhaps never 
before in the history of Los Angeles was a pre-con- 
vention contest so full of acrimonious personalities, 
so laden with bitter and uncalled-for attacks upon 
the personal integrity of some of the men who had 
enlisted, and are still in the fight, for the improve- 
ment of political conditions in California — a state 
which needs their services now more than ever be- 
fore. Aside from this deplorable feature of the 
campaign, perhaps the most noteworthy, as "side 
issues", was the active participation therein of 

county and federal officials. . One man 

Pernicious occupying one of the most important 

Activity federal offices so interested himself in 

the work of the Southern Pacific poli- 
tical organization that, had Cleveland been Presi- 
dent, the chances are that he would have been be- 
headed, metaphorically speaking, for his "pernicious 
activity". Anothe-r, a county official, was openly 
charged with having let the important work of his 
office go to the dogs that he might devote his office 
hours — services paid for by the public — to the work 
of keeping the Southern Pacific trenches filled by 
"loyal" members of the "organization". But the 
majority of the people still appear to like this meth- 
od of conducting government, so there is little use 
in doing anything more than to lament — for the 
present. 

* * * 

Some people are so contrary by nature that they would 
refuse to be happy if they saw that everybody else was. 

* * * 

THE POLICE force of Los Angeles was never 
nearer low water mark than now, if the evidence of 
our senses is to be relied upon. It is inevitable that 



Pacific Outlook 



the effects o£ partnership with gamblers, with 
houses of prostitution, with vice in every form, go 
to the bottom from the top, demoralizing as they 
progress With the responsible authorities in any 
department either tolerating or encouraging law- 
breaking, nothing is more natural than that the rank 
and file should follow the example set for them, even 
if not under direct orders to wink at the law's viola- 
tions No common patrolman wants to be kicked 
out of his salaried position, and those who are will- 
ing to take their chances hi this 
Near Low direction by incurring the displeas- 
Water Mark ure of their superiors are rare. 
Whether .patrolmen and detectives 
do their full duty depends— it depends upon the atti- 
tude of the bosses of the department. In the twmk- 
lino- of an eye the police commission, the supreme 
authority in the police department— the. police com- 
mission created by the mayor and therefore sub- 
ject to a great extent, to his whims and caprices- 
could see to it that the -laws were enforced. That 
it does not so decree, and back up its mandate by 
the force at its immediate command, permits of but 
one conclusion. And that conclusion is that the 
members of the police commission do not want to 
abide by their solemn oaths to enforce the law. 
Decent people should shun such influences as they 
would any other forces which, by inaction in the 
face of attacks upon the social fabric, become silent 
partners of vice. 

Queen Wilhelmina declares that she will yet meet Castro 
"face to face". Not if that arrant little coward, knows it 

* * * 

DURING the sessions of the recent Constitution 
Congress held in London Professor Albert Venn 
Dicey of Oxford, in discussing the Constitution of 
the United States, referred to what he described as 
a "melancholy paradox" in connection with our 
precious organic law. He said that while the 
United States started with an advantage unknown 
in any other country — with a Constitution designed 
with more care, more skill and more success than 
almost any other constitution deliberately designed 
by man — yet the candid American citizen would 
say that, on the whole, America was little better 
governed than the best European states, while the 
candid European critic would say 

Cuspidor that the United States is not much 
Constitutions worse governed than the best states 
of Europe. This is the "melancholy 
paradox" which he declares exists in a country 
"filled with noble people who are governed in a 
way that would not for a moment be tolerated in 
Paris, London or Berlin." It is to be presumed that 
Professor Dicey has either studied the operation of 
government under the Constitution of the United 
States and under the various State Constitutions at 
close range or that he has been a close student in 
the progress of government while seated in his li- 
brary. It is possible that he has learned how some 
of our State Constitutions, notably that of Califor- 
nia, have been used as cuspidors, and sometimes as 
foot mats. The American people will do well to 
pause long before essaying to reply to his criticism. 

* * * 

He who sows the truth in too large quantities in one 
field is pretty sure to raise a large crop of skepticism. 

* * * 

IT WAS EDIFYING to read, in the Express the 
other evening, the following account of an incident 



reported to have occurred at a session of the Police 
Commission called to investigate (?) charges pre- 
ferred by A. Q. St. George against Patrolman N. S. 
Carr. The account reads as follows : "At one point 
during the hearing the complainant objected to the 
attitude assumed by the chief. 'Is he supposed to 

represent the people or the police?' 

Is This a he asked the mayor. Kern replied 

Bureaucracy? that he represents the police. 'Who 

pays his salary — the police or the 
people?' Mr. St. George asked. 'That's none of 
your business,' the mayor replied." If the mayor 
was correctly quoted in the foregoing account we 
may take it as a bit of evidence tending to prove 
that plain citizens of Los Angeles, who contribute 
to the support of the police and other departments, 
have no right, in the mind of the chief magistrate 
of the city, to do anything except to foot the bills. 
Is it possible that municipal government has been 
reduced to a bureaucracy? It would appear so. 

* * * 

Don't say all you have to say. Don't want to say all you 
have to say. Let your acquaintances suppose that you are 
not empty, however empty you may be. 

t t t 

OFFICIALS of the Los Angeles-Pacific Railway 
Company announce that the Hill street tunnel, now 
in course of construction, will be completed within 
six months, and that by the time it is opened for 
traffic the road's gauge will have been standardized. 
Ten minutes' time will be saved each way to pa- 
trons of the line. The completion of the work will 
be hailed with delight by the thousands who are 
compelled to travel on this road. In the new plan of 
operation it is to be hoped that the company will 
take into consideration the comfort and convenience 
of al its patrons by making provision for through 
cars to Hollywood, Colegrove and other suburban 
points, especially during the busiest hours of the 
day, in the morning and early even- 
Railway ing. A few through cars during 
Development "rush hours" will be a great con- 
venience to those residing in the 
outlying districts, as well as those living within the 
city limits who are compelled to travel to and from 
the business district by this line. The overcrowded 
condition of the cars during the busy hours has been 
the cause of much just complaint in the past, and it 
may be very easily obviated with profit to the com- 
pany as well as for the comfort of patrons of the 
road. The pursuit of a liberal policy in this direc- 
tion will insure the rapid upbuilding of such towns 
as Hollywood and Colegrove and the development 
of other suburbs. The hitherto wretched service 
has been one of the chief drawbacks to the growth 
of these districts. With an improved service and 
the resultant increase in population to the north- 
west of the city, the profits accruing to the railway 
company inevitably must be materially greater. 

* * + 

The excuse for the big bow on the isfhoe of tlhe young 
lady has been found. It makes the foot look smaller by 
contrast. 

* + * 

THE SHEER habit of partisanship is responsible 
for numerous inconsistencies — or shall >we say 
idiosyncrasies? — which we discover to be attributes 
of many ordinarily thoughtful and reasonable men. 
The attitude of strong "party" Democrats, on the 



Pacific Outlook 






hand, and of equally partisan Republican! 
the other hand, ai - much from the < 

tial differences between the platforms of the two 
great partic- a- it does from the custom of berat- 
ing, rather than of rating, the candidates. Every 
intelligent Republican will admit, for instance, that 
what he calls "Rooseveltism" is really, in large 

measure, the ideals of l'.ryanism accomplished. 

With much truth the Democratic managers, and 

their mamagee, Mr. Bryan himself, have accused the 

Republicans of having stolen Mr. 

All That Bryan's clothing; or. in other words, 

Is Left that the dominant part) has camped on 
the grounds once held by the opposi- 
tion. The latter is up in arms because the party 
now controlling the country is shouting through the 
Democratic megaphone, '["here are planks in each 
national platform which differ from those on the 
same subject in the other, but the planks that run 
practically parallel outnumber the others. It is 
hard, indeed, to find enough difference between the 
two platforms to make the fight anything more than 
a sham battle, excepting in their divergence on poli- 
cies to which the country is definitely pledged. 
There seems to be nothing left to the Democratic 
party except to reach back into Taft's past to see if 
some early folly can be unearthed, and nothing for 
the Republicans to do except to turn the search- 
light on Bryan's slouch hat and blue jeans which lie 
wears at home and his silk hat and frock coat which 
he is accused of donning when he goes East to in- 
spect the camp of the enemy. 
* + + 

In the game of love and matrimony, an American queen 
is frequently taken by a foreign knave. 

+ + + 

BY A VOTE of six to one — the opposition being 
confined to Councilman Healey — the City Council 
has passed the long-discussed dance hall ordinance, 
under the terms of which these places shall not re- 
main open between midnight Saturday and six 
o'clock Monday morning, no liquor can be sold in 
them, and no youth of either sex under eighteen 
years of age can attend unless accompanied by a 
parent or guardian. The opposition to the meas- 
ure, outside of that offered by lone Councilman 
Healey, was confined to representives of what we 
have come to call the "liberal" element — in other 

words, the element among our 

Let Us population which holds Sunday no 

Give Thanks more sacred than the other six days 

of the week. During the present 
administration this element doubtless has been 
greatly encouraged to believe that Los Angeles was 
to take rank among the modern "wide open" cities, 
without hindrance. Already, it has been stated, 
dance hall promoters have formed plans to evade 
the ordinance, if possible ; but with the legal de- 
partment of the city conducted as at present it is 
not likely that any such movement will succeed. 
Hereafter Sunday in Los Angeles will be observed 
more in accord with healthy public sentiment, and 
certain public dance halls will no longer be con- 
ducted as promoters of and procurers for houses of 
infamy. For which let us give thanks. 

* * * 

Among all the luxuries that the overrich enjoy con- 
science is rarely found. 

* * + 

THE PRESIDENT of the organization known as 
the United Mine Workers of America says there 



is no room in his organization for politics, and he 
advises laboring men to cast their ballots according 
to the dictates of their i wn several consciences, for* 
getting that such a man as Gompers exists — or. 
failing this, that he ever intimated that the vote of 

labor might be a deliverable quan- 
Cannot Be tity. In the presence of more than 
"Delivered" five thousand miners he offered this 

advice the other day. and not a dis- 
senting voire was heard. Mad President Lewis at- 
tempted that which Gompers evidently seeks to ac- 
complish he probably would have been hissed down. 
Hie vote of organized labor cannot be "delivered". 
It is the most independent vote — and the most hon- 
est vote, in many respects — in the country. No- 
body but a demagogue or a fool will offer or threat- 
en to "pledge" it to any party. The American la- 
borer has brains, even if he does get excited some- 
times, under great provocation. 

* * + 

The man with the biggest pull does not always draw 
the heaviest load. 

■!■ 4, «f» 

IN THE current number of Out West Will C. 
Barnes of Las Vegas, N. M., has an interesting 
article on the United States Forest Service. The 
writer is one of the most widely known cattlemen 
of the arid region of America and an authority on 
the subject of which he writes. Out West, by the 
way, is printing some of the best articles dealing 
with big western questions which have been offered 
to publishers. If people generally understood the 
value of these offerings Out West would be- 
Out come one of the most widely read maga- 
West zines in America. It is strange that thou- 
sands upon thousands of intelligent residents 
of the coast states will buy the eastern magazines 
every month, whether these contain anything of 
particular interest to the people of the West or not, 
and seldom think of the valiant efforts that are be- 
ing put forth by the publishers of such a magazine 
as Out West to tell the world of the manifold ad- 
vantages and opportunities offered by the region 
which it represents. Out West ought to have a 
hundred thousand regular readers. 

* * * 

Money is some men's religion; in such cases the de- 
nomination cuts no figure. 

+ * * 

WHETHER the railroads will rais« their freight 
rates or not depends, of course, upon the action of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. The ques- 
tion as to the power and the attitude of the federal 
government toward the railroads will be tested in a 
remarkable action recently brought before the com- 
mission. Texas and Oklahoma have entered a 
formal complaint before 'the commission against 
sixty-three roads operating in those states, asking 
that these roads be forbidden to raise their rates. 
These states will also apply to the department of 
justice for action to this end. The complaint seeks 
to secure the application of all laws there are regu- 
lating railroads to the cases in hand. It charges 
combination in restraint of trade, capitalization 
greatly in excess of values, and the injustice of the 
railroads' fixing rates which will pay divi- 
Is It a dends on this watered stock. It seeks the 
Fraud? enforcement of the Sherman law, declar- 
ing that the tariff committee which fixes 
rates for these roads jointly is a>n illegal combina- 



8 



Pacific Outlook 



tion. While it is now generally understood that the 
Sherman law was never intended to be rigidly en- 
forced anywhere, its provisions being in the nature 
of a threat or warning, it appears to be the only law 
under which proceedings against roads transacting 
an interstate business may be brought. Neverthe- 
less it is well that the attitude of the federal govern- 
ment, through the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion, is to be definitely determined by the action of 
Texas and Oklahoma. It is well that people should 
know, now, just what the railroads may or may not 
do with "their" properties — highways of commerce 
operated upon public lands for the supposed bene- 
fit of the whole people, rather than for the benefit 
of the owners of great stock issues. If the Sher- 
man law is a fizzle and a fraud, the sooner the peo- 
ple are certain of it the better. 

* * * 

(A man should always have a guest room in his house; 
a woman a love chamber in her heart How little we care 
for a woman without such a garnished vacancy, ever ready 
for a possible inmate! 

* * * 

The A^orld's Prog'ress 

This year's Presidential election in America is go- 
ing to be marked by two features, both of them due 
to the reflex action of British influence and example. 
One is the emergence, if not of a definite labor party, 
at least of a new spirit of class consciousness among 
the workingmen of the country, and a new realiza- 
tion of all they stand to gain by casting their votes 
as a unit. The other feature is the growing in- 
vasion of the field of politics by American women. 
Both these phenomena owe their impulse and initia- 
tive very largely to the developments that have 
taken place in Great Britain within the last "few 
years. 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., the most famous inland 
resort in America, at which racetrack and prac- 
tically all other forms of gambling have flourished 
for many years, with occasional interruptions due 
to sporadic popular efforts to end it, has become 
the chief target at which Governor Hughes has 
aimed his shafts in his campaign for t ! he abolition 
of the gambling evil from the state. Many of the 
residents of that village are opposing the Governor 
in his efforts to see that the laws are enforced, on 
the plea that to do so will "hurt business." The 
majority of the town's inhabitants, however, want 
to see the place purified. 

First steps in the war against the Italian operatic 
trust were taken a few days ago in Paris, where a 
secret council was held to discuss appropriate meas- 
ures of defense. This council was attended by 
Giulio Gatti-Casazza, manager of the Metropolitan 
Opera, and Otto H. Kahn, one of the most import- 
ant directors of that institution. The trust is formed 
between the Italian and South American theaters to 
employ Italian singers throughout the year and pre- 
vent their making London or American- engage- 
ments. 

Harlem, N. Y., has a rival of Maxim. His name 
is William Patten', and he has built a model of a gun 
to be discharged by centrifugal force instead of 
with explosives. His force is supplied by a central 
wheel which will be worked by a fifty-horse power 
motor when he builds a six-foot gun. But in his 
present ten-inch model Patten turns this wheel by 
hand and he seems to do marvelous things with it. 
He needs no shell or cartridge, but uses leaden bul- 



lets, the wheel firing them out as fast as they can 
be poured into the gun. A New York Times re^ 
porter vouches for the fact that the gun put 400 
buck-shot into a space five-eighths of an inch in 
diameter in less than a minute. The target was 
forty feet away. Patten believes that his six-foot 
gun will fire 50,000 half-inch steel bullets a minute, 
with force enough to kill at 2,000 feet. The gun 
will revolve so as simply to rain bullets into any- 
thing within range. 

The destruction of Count Zeppelin's airship will 
not seriously impede the development of aerial navi- 
gation. The predecessor of this ship has been 
bought by the German government, and its succes- 
sor was under construction before the accident. 
Baldwin, Santos Dumont and aeronauts of other 
countries have constructed successful airships, so 
this accident will merely cause delay and not at all 
defeat the development of the new mode of naviga- 
tion. 

Strong sentimemt has developed in New Zealand 
in favor of the formation of an Anglo-American 
alliance in the Pacific for the advancement and de- 
fense of the interests of the white men as against 
those of the yellow races. The suggestion which is 
on the lips of everyone goes further, and proposes 
the dissolution, of the Anglo-Japanese alliance to 
make way for the unhampered coalition of the in- 
terests of England and America in this part of the 
world. 

A "sounder" balloon recently sent up from Pitts- 
field, Mass., attained a height of six miles, where a 
temperature of more than thirty degrees below zero 
was recorded. "Sounders" are small balloons 
weighing only a few ounces and carrying an alumi- 
num box containing various meteorological instru- 
ments for recording the temperature and wind 
velocity of the upper air and the altitude attained;- 

Jewelers have reason to look with fear and per- 
turbation on the development in aerial inventions, 
because "the successful operation of airships and 
dirigible balloons will mean an opportunity for the 
smuggler to operate without the chance of being 
caught." 

Alzen is the name given to a new, metal, which is 
composed of two parts of aluminum and one part 
of zinc. It. is said to equal cast iron in strength, but 
is much more elastic. Alzen is superior because it 
does not rust and takes a high polish. 

The West and East alike have found out that the 
playground is even more valuable for making good 
citizens than 'for making healthy bodies, and it is 
because playgrounds make good citizens that they 
are receiving such loyal support. 

The Japanese government is investigating the na- 
ture of. the betting at the various race meetings, and' 
if it is found to injure social order in any way it 
will be strictly prohibited. 

Another Pronouncing Test 



Generic. 

Homogeneity. 

Vehemence. 

Onerous. 

Forbade. 

Discern. 



Corporeal. 

Sonorous. 

Predecessor. 

Hereditary. 

Ethereal. 

Illustrate. 



Portfolio. 

Schism. 

Ethereal. 

Comment. 

Irrefutable. 

Irrevocable. 



Pacific Outlook 









•*« 



TOE MOUNTAIN «.©« 



By Mary W. Rich 

When this beautiful world was created. 

Expressing an infinite thought. 
From earth and huge granite bowlders 

A wonderful mountain was wrought. 

In the heart of this lofty mountain, 
Deep down where no eye could look, 

Protected by naiads and fairies, 
Was hidden the life of a brook. 

One day. while the fairies were sleeping 

And nature quiescent and still, 
It burst from its adamant prison — 

A jubilant musical rill, 

And ran away over chasms and gorges, 
Bidding home and mountain "adieu". 

Was crowned by the luminous Sun-God 
With a rainbow of brilliant hue; 

Ran boist'rously into a meadow 
Where nature was hushed and serene, 

So seductive the wild mountain torrent 
Fell asleep in the green and sheen. 

The cowslips and pink water lilies 

Reflected a blush on its face, 
And a kiss from the noon-day sunlight 

Baptised with a gentle grace. 

It glided away through the alders 

To a road-side near a school. 
While travelers and dusty barefoots 

Quenched their thirst in its limpid pool. 

Rejoiced were the soft pussy willows, 
And full was the air with bird song; 

Glad were the sprouting hedges 
And all the green-hued throng. 

For the brook that was born in the mountain 

To all a blessing had brought. 
Who can doubt at these glories of nature 

They were not by Omnipotence wrought? 




A 



10 



Pacific Outlook 




A Story by Hans CHristian Andersen Wliicri May Be Made 
to Fit Almost Anywhere 




Hare. 



! PRIZE, or rather two prizes, had been' ap- 
pointed — a great one and a little one — for 
the greatest swiftness, ■ not in a single 
race, but for swiftness throughout an en- 
tire year. "I got the first prize !" said the 
"There must be justice when relations and 
good friends are among the prize committee ; but 
that the Snail should have received the second prize 
I consider almost an insult to myself." 

"No!" declared the Fence-rail, who had been wit- 
ness at the distribution of prizes, "reference must 
also be had to industry and perseverance. Many re- 
spectable people said so, and I understood it well. 
The Snail certainly took half a year to get across 
the threshold of the door ; but he did himself an in- 
jury and broke his collar-bone in the haste he was 
compelled to make. He devoted himself entirely 
to his work, and he ran with his house on his back ! 
All that is very charming, and that's how he got the 
second prize." 

"I might certainly have been considered, too," 
said the Swallow. "I should think that no one ap- 
peared swifter in flying and soaring than myself, 
and how far I have been around — far — far — far I" 

"Yes, that's just your misfortune," said the Fence- 
rail. "You're too fond of fluttering. You must al- 
ways be journeying about into far countries when 
it begins to be cold here. You've no love of father- 
land in you. You cannot be taken into account." 

"But if I lay in the moor all through the winter?" 
said the Swallow. "Suppose I slept through the 
whole time ; shouldn't I be taken into account 
then ?" 

"Bring a certificate from the old moor-hen that 
you have slept away half the time in your father- 
land, and you shall be taken into account." 

"I deserved the first prize, and not the second," 
said the Snail. "I know so much, at least, that the 
Hare only ran from cowardice because he thought 
each time there was danger in delay. I, on the other 
hand, made my running the business of my life, and 
have become a cripple in the service. If anyone was 
to have had the first prize, I should have had it ; but 
I don't understand chattering and boasting; on the 
contrary, I despise it." 

And the Snail looked quite haughty. 

"I am able to. despose with word and oath that 
each prize, at least my vote for each, was given af- 
ter proper consideration," observed the old Bound- 
ary-post in the wood, who had been a member of 
the college of judges. "I always go on with due 
consideration, with order and calculation. Seven 
times before I have had the honor to be present at 
the distribution of prizes and to give my vote ; but 
not till today have I carried out my will. I always 
went to the first prize from the beginning of the 
alphabet, and to the second from the end. Be kind 
enough to give me your attention, and I will explain 
to you how one begins at the beginning. The 



eighth letter from "A" is "H", and there we have 
the Hare, and so I awarded him the first prize ; the 
eighth letter from the end of the alphabet is "S", 
and therefore the Snail received the second prize. 
Next time "I" will haye its turn for the first prize, 
and "R" for the second : there must be due order 
and calculation in everything. One must have a cer 
tain starting point." 

"I should certainly have voted for myself if I had 
not been among the judges," said the Mule, who 
had been one of the committee. "One must not 
only consider the rapidity of advance, but every 
other quality also that is found — as, for example, 
how much a candidate is able to draw ; but I would 
not have put that prominently forward this time, 
nor the sagacity of the Hare in his flight, or the cun- 
ning with which he suddenly takes a leap one side 
to bring people on a false track so that they may 
not know where he has hidden himself. No, there 
is something else on which many lay great stress, 
and which one may not leave out of the calculation. 
I mean' what is called, the beautiful. On the beau- 
tiful I particularly fix my eyes ; I looked at the beau- 
tiful well-grown ears of the Hare ; it's quite a pleas- 
ure to see how long they are ; it almos't seemed to 
me that I saw myself in the days of my childhood. 
And so I voted for the Hare." 

"But," said the Fly, "I'm not going to talk, I'm 
only going to say that I've overtaken more than one 
Hare. Quite lately I crushed the hind legs of one. 
I was sitting in front of a railway train — I often 
do that, for thus one can best notice one's own 
swiftness. A young hare ran for a long time in 
front of the engine ; he had no idea that I was pres- 
ent ; but at last he was obliged to give in and spring 
aside — and then the engine crushed his hind legs, 
for I was upon it. The hare lay there, but I rode 
on. That certainly was conquering him ! But 1 
don't count upon getting the prize." 

"It certainly appears to me," thought the Wild 
Rose — but she did not say it, for it is not her na- 
ture to give her opinion, though it would have been 
quite as well if she had done so — "it certainly ap- 
pears to me that the Sunbeam ought to have had 
the first prize and the second, too. The Sunbeam 
flies with intense rapidity along the enormous path 
from the sun to ourselves, and arrives in such 
strength that all nature awakes to it ; such beauty 
does it possess that all we roses blush and exhale 
fragrance in its presence. Our worshipful judges 
do not appear to have noticed him at all. If I were 
the Sunbeam, I would give each of them a sunstroke 
— but that would only make them mad, and that 
they may become as things stand, I 'say nothing," 
thought the Wild Rose. "May peace reign in the 
forest. It is glorious to blossom, to scent, and to 
live — to live in song and legend. The Sunbeam 
will outlive us all". 

"What's the first prize?" asked the Earthworm, 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



who had overslept the time, and only came up now. 

n>i>ts in a free admission t" a Cabbage 

len," replied the Mule "1 proposed that as the 

prize. The Hare was decide I to have won it, and 

therefore I. as an active and reflective member, 

cial notice of tlic advantage of him who was to 
it; now the Hare is provided for. The Snail 

may sit upon the fence and lick tip moSS and sun- 
shine, and has further been appointed one of the 
first umpires in the racing. That's worth a great 
deal, to have some one of talent in the thins nun 
call a committee. I must say 1 expect much from 
the future — we have made a vcrv good beginning." 

Mr. Harris and "Uncle Remus" 

Joel Chandler Harris did not look like a literary 
man. did not talk or act like one, and, for that 
matter, always refused to consider himself as one. 
But "Uncle Remus" has been translated into twen- 
ty-seven languages, and it would not he easy to 
name any American author who will be surer of 
his readers' hearts a hundred years hence, says a 
contributor to the Review of Reviews. 

Mr. Harris was a Georgia newspaper man, a very 
quiet, shy person of homely tastes in everything 
save reading, an author who was obscured by im- 
mediate panic when a strange admirer worshiped 
before him. He was, however, the truest and most 
unaffected friend in his own little circle — a man who 
could enjoy taking the reins of the street-car horse 
that plodded toward his office while the driver ate 
his dinner inside, as much as he could suffer when 
a strange interviewer invaded his sanctum, bent 
on exploiting him. 

He always felt that the "Uncle Remus" stories 
were a sort of accident in which he bore a compara- 
tively unimportant part. The stories appeared first 
in the Atlanta Constitution in the 70's. Harris 
had at the age of twelve entered a country news- 
paper office as a printer's devil. He had gone 
through the multifarious "grind" of a provincial 
newspaper man in Savannah, Macon, and elsewhere, 
when in 1876 Colonel Howell brought him to the 
Atlanta Constitution as editorial writer and capable 
journalistic man-of-all-work. Soon after this "Si" 
Small, who had been doing dialect sketching for 
the Constitution, resigned, and Colonel Howell, 
with some difficulty, persuaded Harris to 'Step into 
the breach and keep the readers amused. 

The only thing the young editor could think of 
was to write down the old plantation stories he had 
heard in the negro cabins while, after the fashion 
of Southern boys, he had loafed with the darkies 
in front of the big open fireplace, with hoecakes 
browning and bacon sizzling. So he ransacked his 
memory for the most characteristic of these darky 
stories, printed them in the Constitution, and be- 
came famous. 

t * ♦ 

Couldn't Be Deader 

An Ohio lawyer tells of a client of his — a Ger- 
man farmer, a hard-working, plain, blunt man — 
who lost his wife not long ago. The lawyer had 
sought him out to express his sympathy, but to his 
consternation the Teuton laconically observed: 

"But I am again married." 

"You don't tell me!" exclaimed the legal light. 
"Why, it has been but a week or two since you 
buried your wife !" 

"Dot's so, my frent ; but she is as dead as effer 
she vill be." — Lippincott's. 




We 
Pay 



Attention 
To 
Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



Office Furniture Reduced, Special Prices NextWeek 

For six days, — Aug. 24 to 29 — we will sell "business" 
furniture from a third to a quarter below regular 
nee for the "office man". prices — an exceptional cha 
Flat-top desks', $8.50 up; standing desks, $14.50 up; 
roll-top desks, $15 up; rotary chairs, $6.50 up. The 
best in this line at the usual cost of the common- 
place — be prompt. 

Ips^n§eles furniture (jo. 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH and SEVENTH STREETS 

Furniture.Carpeta.Ru^A.Draperiefi and Wall Papera 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



Tke Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 



W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



J 



Phone F 4146 • Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

727 S. BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



M. NAXHANSON 

LADIES' TAILOR 
HABIT MAHLER 

... Highest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 

216 Mercantile Place 



12 



Pacific Outlook 




A Newcomer from Indiana Takes Exceptions to Some THing£s 
He Has Seen and Heard jn Los Angeles 



IV 



A 



T THE theater the other evening I was 
honored by an introduction to Mrs. 

, who, my wife informed me as my 

acknowledgements were being made, was 
one of the most active club women in the 
city. Being a mere man, and, withal, one who had 
never been fortunate enough to see the inside of a 
woman's clubhouse, I tried to be properly im- 
pressed. At any rate I endeavored to convince my- 
self that I was. I could fairly feel the unction as it 
radiated from the personality next to me. If I felt 
rather insignificant for the while, wasn't it natural? 

For she had been president of the club, a 

frequent delegate to national, and for all I know in- 
ternational, conventions of the Federated Societies 
for the Promotion of the Spirit of Fair Play Toward 
Women, and had prepared and read on numerous 
occasions profound papers on such topics as "Who 
is the best nurse, the father or the mother?", "Why 
don't men stay at home nights?", "Is man better 
qualified for the ballot than woman : If so, why?", 
"Man's sub-conscious ego compared with woman's 
intuition", and kindred subjects. 

Between the acts the conversation drifted to the 
work of woman's clubs — for I was interested and 
persistent. In fact, I drifted it myself. 

"Yes," she beamed benignly, "our organizations 
have done much for women, and I think you will 
find that the average man will condescend to admit 
that they have been a material and cogent influence 
in the enlightenment of man, also. You know that 
we take up the study of some of the most profound 
questions of the day. Yes, many of us are in favor 
of conferring the franchise upon women, and our 
efforts in that direction will bear fruit one of these 
days." 

"Do you believe, madame," I inquired, "that the 
majority of men, especially those in public life — 
•take our legislators and the judges of our courts, 
for instance — are disposed to confer upon women 
the right of suffrage?" 

"Really, to be truthful, I must say that I think 
they are," she replied. "Certainly the public men of 
California are exhibiting a growing spirit of fair- 
ness. Other states are learning, too. Did you know 
that out of 575,000 women; of voting age in Massa- 
chusetts, but 361 voted against a proposal to give 
women the ballot? The result in Maine was prac- 
tically the same, and so in. Illinois, New York, Kan- 
sas, Iowa and other states I might mention. At the 
time of the last constitutional convention in New 
York state the vote stood 300,000 for and but 15,- 

000 against equal suffrage." 

I believe I looked convinced. I certainly tried to. 
Before the conversation turned upon other topics 

1 made up my mind to ask a lot of women among 
my wife's acquaintances what they thought of the 
proposal to put the ballot in the hands of women. 
What do you think about it, Mr. Editor? 



Before this very convincing talk with this well- 
informed woman — at least I suppose she was well- 
informed for she talked as if she were — I had sup- 
posed that the average woman cared little abput 
the ballot. Possibly I have been unfortunate in my 
acquaintanceship with women. It has always 
struck me that if, instead of devoting so much of 
their energies to seeking changes in our state con- 
stitutions that would place them on what they re- 
gard an equality with man, women who really want 
to bring about certain reforms in government would 
first apply themselves to influencing the votes of 
their husbands, their sons and their brothers, they 
would find their efforts less unavailing. Doesn't it 
strike you that the first thing for the progressive 
woman to do, if she is to hope for the early eleva- 
tion of the political status of her kind, is to be sure 
she's right before she goes ahead? Don't you be- 
lieve that her immediate efforts should be directed 
toward a more nearly perfect enlightenment on 
questions of grave public concern? Knowledge 
first, conviction of mere man second, the ballot third : 
This is the order in which, it seems to me, she should 
proceed. 

And yet, if she convinces man, perhaps she will 
not care so much about the ballot, after all. 

I am glad I am not "in politics". in California — 
especially in Los Angeles or San Francisco. It is 
most unhealthful for a man's peace of mind, whether 
he is on the right side or the wrong. Think of what 
has been "handed out" to some of the men who have 
been taking an active interest in the movement to 
better political conditions in this state! It's enough 
to cause the hardiest soul to hesitate. I begin to 
feel as if I wanted to join the fight — but, mercy on 
me ! think of the tatters that would be all that could 
be seen of my reputation after the first campaign! 

I guess I'm a moral coward. The woods are full 
of them, though. It is terrible to see two million 
people afraid of one lone railroad corporation, 
which, as a political factor, might be wiped off the 
earth in one fell swoop if all professed men were 
only real men. 

I am worried. I have not been, able to find out 
something that I want to know. Perhaps you will 
be able to enlighten me. Why is it that the new 
postoffice is being erected so far north of the busi- 
ness center of the town, especially when everybody 
can see, with half an eye, that this center is moving 
further and further away, by leaps and bounds, from 
the new building? Did anybody with a "pull" grind 
his axe at the expense of Uncle Sam when the loca- 
tion was established? Who can tell me? 

I attended morning service in the Episcopal 
church in a suburban town last Sunday morning. 
In the course of his remarks — for the speaker, in- 






Pacific Outlook 



13 



•mem. talk 
the n which tic had re- 

cently returned — the n red to the bl 

l certain I thick 

u could hang v.nir hat on it." Whereat n< 

v in the church Mir quite audibly. 

This is my kind of a minister. I 1 

his parishioners, in church as well as 
thoroughly human Footing. I'll wager 
— anil 1 don't know this preacher, either — that he 
has a thousand times ;<s much influence among the 
"sheep in his flock" as the long-faced preacher who 
never dares to crack a smile, and who delights in 
arising in his pulpit and solemnly announcing the 
first words of such a hymn, for instance, as "Hark! 
from the tooomb a Ful sound." 

STIMULUS. 
+ + + 

Dust Germs 

One germ found in dust needs especial mention, 
- llollis Godfrey in the Atlantic. Tuberculosis, 
which may be classed aim in- the dust diseases, rav- 
ages our country beyond all other plagues today. 

The consumptive sheds hundreds of thousands of 
living tubercle bacilli. . . . Once mixed with 
dust, deposited on sand or other cutting' particle, 
the poisoned weapon flies upward ready to cut 
through and enter the body through the lesion 
formed in the lungs. In case after case we find in 
the lungs of' perfectly healthy persons small tuber- 
cular lesions which have healed, showing that they 
were able to combat the poison when attacked. 

But how about the time of low resistance? How 
can the citizen tell when that time may come to him 
or to his family? The magnificent crusade against 
tuberculosis is doing much to convince the in- 
dividual of the necessity of care against scattering 
contagion. The municipality can do almost as 
much toward the stamping out of the plague by a 
steady constant struggle to achieve the cleanest 
possible street. 

In the dirt of the assembly hall, of the theater, of 
the hotel and the railway car we find conditions in 
which the difficulties which exist in the private 
house are fourfold multiplied. For hours the crowds 
of people in such places sit breathing the accumu- 
lated dust brought from the streets which, rising 
from the floor, floats in clouds into the air and set- 
tles heavily on the antiquated plush still in high 
favor for such places. 

It is but a year or two ago that the newspapers 
considered briefly the dangers of that bacterial 
paradise, the Pullman sleeping car. A brief spasm 
of remonstrance .passed over the country and dis- 
appeared as suddenly as it came. The peril from 
such sources was, however, recognized two decades 
ago by more than one, and a quotation concerning 
the presence of tuberculosis in such places from Dr. 
Mitchell Prudden, written almost two decades ago, 
holds as true today : "When the infectious nature 
of consumption becomes generally appreciated, 
hotels and transportation companies over long- 
routes will be compelled to provide special accom- 
modations for such persons as are known to be thus 
affected." 

+ * * 

She — Doesn't coffee ever make you nervous? 

He — Not unless I've got a lot of money in it on 
a falling market. Then the weaker it is the more 
nervous it makes me. 




SHIRTS 

OUR 

SPECIALTY 

Many new novelties in Patterns 
lorings. Also a com- 
pile line of nobby Neckwear, 
Hosiery and Handkerchiefs to 
rcatch. 



223W. Fifth St. Troy Laundry Company 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




IMPERIAL 


V A LLE Y 




Vou will buy lots in 


the town of 






HEBER 




next Fall. 


Why not now? 


50 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftus &l 


Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St 


„ Grosse Bldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE K! DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



ANDIRONS— GRATES— FIRE SETS 

In Jtrtistlc Designs 
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. ''^pI^Wt 



Wfanyout/tiftfrf&&tdtfturtef 

D T TTE "i!Bfe&^ IT T 

* I 



For- 
w t. sale. 

''"grocer 




'BUTTERN 

VNUT7 



BaMri, 
, Company 
'Lot Anodes 



14 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




Miss Lucille Chandler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jefferson Chandler, whose marriage to Raymond W. 
Stephens will take place August 26, was compli- 
mented guest at a buffet luncheon and bridge party 
with which Miss Helen Newlin, one of her brides- 
maids, entertained Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Harry 
Coburn Turner gave a bridge party for her Wednes- 
day afternoon and Thursday evening Miss Helen 
Wells was hostess at an evening affair given in 
Miss Chandler's honor. Another event planned for 
the popular bride-elect was a buffet luncheon given 
by Mrs. Robert Sherman at her summer home, 
Playa del Rey, Friday afternoon. 

In honor of Mss Nellie Sheldon, whose engage- 
ment to Graham Woodbridge Lawrence of Marshall- 
town, Iowa, has been announced, Mrs. Frederick 
Stanwood entertained with a luncheon of eight cov- 
ers Tuesday. The other guests were Mrs. F. C. 
Sheldon, Mrs. Jasper E. Crandall, Mrs. George 
Maxwell, Mrs. Harry Andrews, Mrs. Harry Crab- 
tree, and Mrs. J. E. Meyer. Mrs. Jasper E. Cran- 
dall will entertain in Miss Sheldon's honor Satur- 
day. 

Miss Harriet Ruenitz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
P. Ruenitz was married Tuesday morning at the 
home of her parents on St. Andrews place, to Irvin 
Hilmer of the German American Bank. The 
groom's brother, Rev. Henry Hilmer of Wilming- 
ton, officiated, E. J. Ruenitz, the bride's brother, 
sang "O Promise Me" and "Sweetheart", Mrs. 
Oscar Schmidt accompanying him. 

Lieutenant-Commander Ashley H. Robertson and 
bride, formerly Juliette Graham Bixby of this city, 
have returned from their wedding trip and are at 
their home in St. James park for a brief period. 

The marriage of Marguerite Lyon, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lyon, and Thomas Betts Sut- 
ton took place Tuesday evening at the home of the 
bride's parents, No. 1060 West Fourth street. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of 
Miss Mabel Helen Hulburt, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Sherwood Hulburt, to C. Rollyn Bur- 
dick. The marriage will take place Sept. 3. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Walker announce the mar- 
riage of their daughter, Blanche Anna, to Stephen 
Jurika. The ceremony was solemnized August 17 
at Manila, Philippine Islands. 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Martyn entertained Tuesday 
evening with bridge whist, having as guests thirty 
prominent tennis players of Pasadena and Los An- 
geles. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of Miss 
Ida Cohen, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. David Cohen, 
to Edward Bloom. 

Miss Grace Spence of Chicago is the guest of 
Miss Edmondson of No. 1236 South Flower street. 

The marriage of Miss Allene Tupper, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Tupper of New York, to Al- 
fred Galpin Wilkes, soir of Judge and Mrs. W. A. 



Wilkes of Los Angeles, will take place Sept. 16 at 
"Overlook", the summer home of the -bride's parents 
in the Catskill mountains. 

Mrs. Thomas Wilkes and Miss Willamena 
Wilkes are visiting m> San Francisco and vicinity. 

Mrs. Stanley Yeamans and Miss Edith Yeamans 
have returned from the Hawaiian islands. 

Miss Minnie Wolff and Leon Bradlor have chosen 
Sept. 20 as the date, for their wedding. 

Mrs. Sidney Lee Grover was hostess Tuesday 
afternoon at a party at Venice. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Braly left Saturday for a tour 
around the world. 

• • ♦ 

Post- Vacation 

Back, back, back, to another tiff with the boss; 

And my poor brain turns backward with infinite care, to 

the shade of her hair and its gloss. 
Back, ba'ck, back, to "balances" — "customers" — "greed". 
But I can't drag away from the salt and the spray, and I 
guess that I'm off of my feed. 
Two weeks that were revels of flirting, 
Two happy-go-lucky old weeks 
And I dream of the "peach" that I met at the 'beach 
With an anguish that bites and is hurting. 

— New York Globe. 



<^ D .\ P -4^ 




'S-. 



So.Broadway ^ifiF^^^^r^ So. Hili- Sthebt 
A. FUSENOT CO. 

Fall Dress Goods 



NEW CREAM 
WOOLENS 



We have just received our fall line of 
Cream Woolens. The assortment in- 
cludes sheer weights for evening wear, 
medium weights for street costumes, 
and heavy weights for outing suits for 
both men and women. Plain weaves, 
hair lines and self stripes are included 
in the assortment, which is the most 
complete we have ever shown. Prices 
range from 50c to $3.00 a yard. 






Pacific Outlook 



16 



STORIES ABOUT LOS ANGELES 



The Island of Los Angeles 
The Rev. I. Arthur Evai Stephen's 

1 church, Hollywooil, who recently re- 
turned from the Pan-Anglican held in 
land, relates an incident of that rc- 
markable gathering which will amuse residents of 
I .. is ^ngi 

At <>ne of the ~iu-ci.il meetings held during the 

life of the congress Mr. Evans was down on the 

gramme for an address. The bishop who acted 

as chairman of the meeting introduced him as "a 

delegate from Los Angeles." Some distance from 
the speaker there arose another delegate, evidently 
an Englishman, who, addressing the bishop, said: 
"My lord, will you kindly a~k the reverend dele- 
gate, if you please, to tell us where that island is?" 



Heaven Had No Attractions 

A Fresno minister died and. as might have been 
expected, went to heaven. Soon after being ushered 
through the golden gate by St. Peter he was es- 
corted about by a guide. In the course of the travels 
of the twain they came to a lot of cages, each con- 
taining; several men who, though the cages were of 
heaviest steel and safely padlocked, were chained 
to the floors of their prisons. 

"Who arc these people?" inquired the Fresno min- 
ister. 

"They are a lot of men from the city of Los An- 
geles," replied his guide. 

"From Los Angeles!" ejaculated the newcomer. 
"There's nothing strange in that, I'm sure, but why 
on earth have you had them put in cages and chained 
to the floors?" 

"Why, sir, because they do not want to stay. Sev- 
eral of them already have tried to escape and go 
back to Los Angeles. This is the only way we can 
keep them here." 



A Natural Mistake 

A gentleman who has recently come to this city 
from San Francisco to reside describes a curious 
dream he had the other night. He dreamed that he 
died, and as he passed from earth he found that he 
was suddenly in company with a mysterious 
stranger, who informed him that he had been sent 
to act as his guide. 

"Where are we going?" inquired the man from 
San Francisco; but the only reply vouchsafed to 
the traveler was a raising of the index finger. Look- 
ing in the direction indicated the traveler saw, in 
the distance, a brilliant illufriinaton of the heavens, 
beneath which he thought he discerned the tops of 
magnificent edifices. As they drew near, in abso- 
lute silence — for the guide was mute — the beautiful 
city loomed larger and more fascinating to the eyes 
of the man from earth. Soon they reached the en- 
trance, and the "departed" discovered that his guide 
had mysteriously abandoned him. 

Wandering about the streets, enraptured at the 
beautiful sights, the traveler suddenly thought to 
inquire for St, Peter, who, oddly enough, had not 
been at the gates of the city to extend the usual wel- 
come. But no personage answering the description 
of St. Peter appeared within view. A man sauntered 
by, his countenance alight with pleasure. The new- 
comer hailed him. 

"Hi, there, you; can you tell me where I can find 
St. Peter?" 



"St. Who?" replied the inhabitant of the wonder- 
ful city, whose ed lently had been slight- 
ly neglected. 

"St. Peter — the cusl this place, of course." 

"The custodian! 1 never heard of such an 
cial. What does he do?" 

"What does he do?" came the reply in amaze- 
ment. "Why, man, how long have you been hi 
Don't you know that St. I'eter is supposed to re- 
main on guard at tin- gates constantly?" 

"The gates;-' \\ hat gates?" 

"Why. the gaii- of heaven, of course." 

'Acs, that's nght." was the reply, "but this is 
not heaven." 

"It isn'l ! Then what is it. will you tell me." 
"Sure. This is Los Angeles." 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. \ 

Shaving Outfits, Pocket and j 
Table Knives, Corkscrew*, i 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, ' 
Sciitors, Shears, Cutlery *^ 
Specialties and Novelties. ~ 


Ml 


do it well. 


-i j \r\ 


210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 


i\J 



^^^ Japanese and Oriental 




ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS AN-D EMB'ROI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kakiuchi Bros. /S'o'L 

533 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
Sth and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER.. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orier on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
loo Clippings - $ 500 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-00 
250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



16 



Pacific Outlook 




Favorite Romance at the Burbank 

"When Knighthood Was iti Flower" is a histori- 
cal drama, the scene of which is laid at the courts of 
England and of France during the reigns of Henry 
the Eighth and Louis the Thirteenth. The dramatis 
personae are familiar folk, royal and ducal people, 
whom we all know quite well, even if we may not be 
so .fortunate as to number among our friends the 
contemporary peers of Twee'dledom. The play is 
lively and spirited and the characters seem to have 
walked forth from the pages of the history — story 
books of our nursery days. We see Henry the 
Eighth, and his austere Katherine ; flippant Anne 
Boleyn and Wolsey, not yet a cardinal, besides a 
Buckingham, a de Longuevilie and a Dauphin of 
France, all of whom behave in a grave, yet merry, 
fashion, as the gracing figures in a pretty tale 
should. 

This meek pageant of "off-with-his-head" kings 
has for. a central power the wayward, wilful and al- 
together delightful Mary Tudor, a part well taken 
by Blanche Hall, who made much of the coquettish 
role assigned to her. She was well seconded by 
Elsie Esmond as Lady Jane, a resourceful woman, 
ever ready for any prank, whether it be the speeding 
of a billet doux or the cheating of the block of the 
head of Charles Brandon, the sword-plying hero. 
William Desmond fills this part picturesquely. He 
fights to kill, abducts a princess and finally marries 
her, thereby achieving a dukedom and confounding 
his enemies, as well as those of Mary Tudor, late 
queen of France. 

This romance is gaily staged and full of fun and 
adventure. Precisely how grandees behaved four 
hundred and odd years ago we do not know, but this 
picture of their imagined doings is probably near 
enough the truth to satisfy most theatergoers bent 
on a whimsical evening. The Burbank company is 
to be congratulated on the success of the perform- 
ance, which abounds in intrigue, buccaneers and 
duels, and is free from the burdon of any phycho- 
logical problem wherewithal to weigh down an idle 
mid-summer night's mood. A very proper fooling. 
The play was given some fifteen months ago by this 
same company with well remembered success. 

The piece for next week is one by Hoyt called 
"A Contented Woman." 



"Muttsburg Life Insurance" 

This week the acting of the Belasco company was 
better than the farce which embodied the efforts of 
its members. One could not fail to be amused by 
Gregory Goop as represented by Jacques Kruger 
or by Horace Goop, the office boy so cleverly 
sketched by Charles Ruggles. The Goop family 
happily typify the perishing ideals of family ties. 
Their family tree, duly ticketed with remote con- 



sanguinities, was half dead, a sapless symbol of 
cousinly love of many removes. 

Whether James Crawford, the author, wished to 
write a satire on life insurance or to poke fun at 
maiden aunts is not quite clear. The whole im- 
broglio was at all times too clouded to be worth 
while clearing up, but several of the character 
studies were droll enough to be entertaining car- 
icatures, although the structure of the piece was 
halting in parts, even falling at times a little flat. 
But the players afforded enough fun in their in- 
dividual parts to compensate for lack of "go" in the 
lines. Dr. Samantha Goop, the cunning and readily 
tearful sister-in-law, was admirably done by Miss 
Eleanor Carey. Miss Florence Smythe as the vin- 
dictive secretary was quite as unpleasant as one 
may reasonably hope for a woman to be, even on the 
stage, and Miss Dorothy Bernard carried her legal 
dignitywith convincing abruptness. Harry Glazier 
in the first act and Howard Scott in the last act 
made good use of their opportunities. 

The saving grace of the piece was, however, the 
confidence with which the parts were played and the 
good feeling which passed over the foot-lights as if 
the actors were fooling to amuse a party of friends, 
acting, as they seemed to do, with intimate non- 
chalance and individual ease. This agreeable re- 
sult comes sometimes with stock companies of long 
standing where the members know each other well 
and where they are assured of the sympathy of the 
audience. It is pleasant to see whilom heroes and 
villains, baffled. maidens and stern mammas out for 
a frolic and eased of the burdens of psychological 
moments tearful, tragic or sordid. Bitterness and 
dismay have left the stage of the Belasco for a week, 
being replaced by kindly laughter, not very car- 
carrying, to be sure, but quite good enough of its 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

Zbc Starr flMano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 






Pacific Outlook 



1/ 



rather than to 
the playwright. 

DON. 



Ancient Play Revived 

W known to the 
I] as that most de- 

■ 
jucr". It has been playe mpany of 

entury <>f theatricals and every 
actress of ability in that time possessing comedy 

instinct or talent li . the role of Miss I I 

castle, while men of note havi played the famous 
part of Tony Lumpkins. To get a tririe out of the 
nary and rather monotonous grind of modernity, 
Mr. Belasco lias decidei to present the Belasco 
impany in this charming comedy next week. 
and admirers of the company will have an oppor- 
tunity to see their favorites in gown and doublet 
and hose, while the stage settings will show old 
ish manors and picturesque inn. 

The story of the comedy i> too well known to 
need repeating: suffice to say that it revolves around 
a very bashful suitor who is free with his tongue to 
menials or those in lower station, while absolutely 
too bashful to talk in society of women of his own 
station. Miss Hardcastle (Miss Grey) pretends to 
be a barmaid and wins him in that way. The part 
of Tony Lumpkins is full of rare comedy and is to 
be intrusted to Richard Vivian. The other members 
of the company are well cast and additions have 
been made for the week because of the large num- 
ber of people required. Several club parties have 
been formed to see the production. 

Following the Goldsmith production, elaborate 
preparations are being made to present the Belasco 
players in Charming Pollock's famous dramatiza- 
tion of "In the Bishop's Carriage". Miss Grey has 
played the lead in this production in the east and 
there is every probability of a notable performance. 



"Peer Gynt" Coming 

"Peer Gynt", the latest contribution Louis James 
has given to the world of dramatic art, has been 
hailed by the most conservative critics as a phantas- 
magoria that mingles high tragedy with satirical 
burlesque, and profound reflecton with nursery 
fables, a masterpiece of modern comedy worthy of 
the brain of a Shakespeare, a Goethe or a Cervantes, 
with a suggestion of W. S. Gilbert or Bernard Sbaw. 

"Peer Gynt", steeped as it is in Norwegian folk 
lore, fantastic with goblin dances, visions, allegorical 
and supernatural figures, colorful with picturesque 
scenes, spectacular with shipwrecks, inspiring with 
oriental dances and songs, prodigal with mechanical 
devices, and blended with appropriate music by 
Grieg, is withal a literary gem, and the greatest 
vehicle that Mr. James has ever had to display -his- 
wonderful versatility, for in "Peer Gynt" he dis- 
closes all the phases of life from youth to old age. 
Los Angeles theater-goers will be delighted to 
know that this remarkable production will be one 
of the -early attractions of the coming season at the 
Mason opera house. 



New American "Trust" Play 

While George Tyler was in Paris recently Cleve- 
land Moffett read to him the lasit act of his new 
play, "A Square Deal". Tyler was so impressed 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We can put you up n home in almost any part of 
the city— iron] Boyle Heights to the Westlake Dis- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Harvey McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 
I 
D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES So FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



PROPERTIES 



B 

u 

S 

I 

N 

E 
S 
S 



TUnberbill Sbirt Co. 

MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SHirts 

Phone F 6715 414H SoutH Broadway 




Leading Clothier* (INC* 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streete. , 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Dome Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co.. Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 
ROBERT flADISON. Sole Agent for Los Angela County 

Phone F 1652 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We Handle {Bargains Only. Rentals, Loans. Investments, 

Insurance 

GUY E. AGENBROAD 

REAL ESTATE 

Phone F 1468 902 Securilu Bldg., Los Angeles, Col 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



with the play that he decided while in Paris to put 
it on in New York in September. 

"It is the most extraordinary play I have seen for 
some time," Mr. Tyler said. "It deals with the 
trusts and money question, as other modern plays 
have, but this play takes ithe millionaires' side. In 
fact, it is the story of a millionaire who went to the 
east side to live and what he did there. I had ac- 
cepted the play some time ago but after hearing- the 
last act today I am convinced of its effect, and shall 
produce it early in the fall." 



Her "Merry Widow" 

Everybody has heard the story of the merry 
widow and the sailors, but here's one from the In- 
dianapolis Sun that says : "A colored lady was sit- 
ting inside a street car with a big basket full of 
clothes on her head. The conductor came in and 
said : 'Lady, you can't come inside with that on your 
head.' The colored lady only looked- up and said: 
'G'long. Dat's ma merry widow.' " 
* * + 

j\ Booh for XKinKers 

Charles O. McCasland in his- new book, "Right 
and Riches", goes to the bottom of some of the great 
questions of the day. Poverty on the one hand and 
excess on the other are therein traced to their pri- 
mary causes. 

We cannot of course endorse all of Mr. McCas- 
land's precepts and conclusions. Like all other 
writers on the tremendous theme of human rela- 
tions, he has made some mistakes, we think, but his 
book will bring any honest student of these vital 
problems nearer to their solutions. The book pro- 
ceeds along entirely new lines and is without fear 
or prejudice toward any class or party. It is in 
reality a text book of economics. The author has no 
pet project of legislation which be holds out as a 
panacea for all ills, but holds that a correct under- 
standing of the true principles of economics by the 
dominant membjers of society will of itself bring 
about the desired conditions. 

The inquiry opens with the question, "Why is it 
such a task to live ? Surely life is for more than mere 
subsistence. Epictetus says the beasts were made 
to bear burdens but man was made to express God." 

The following are some striking lines from dif- 
ferent chapters : 

"No generation had or has any just power to bind 
posterity to any grant or disposal of title to prop- 
erty. Each generation has a right to a new deal." 

"Laws of property are dictated principally by and 
for the advantage of the owners of property." 

"Increase of exchange-value in a commodity is as 
much loss to users as it is gain to the holders." 

Mr. McCasland insists that the important point 
in economics is to grasp the true meaning of capital 
and the compensation for its use, interest. And he 
believes that the failure of writers generally definite- 
ly to define these terms is the cause of the confusion 
in their reasoning. 

Let the understanding obtain of what capital real- 
ly is and how important its unhampered use, and re- 
form will proceed speedily, he thinks. 

Capital is now confused with vested privilege and 
legislation intended to curb such predatory prop- 
erty hampers capital. Such vested privilege, termed 
by him "concession", is declared to prevent the in- 
vestment of capital and so result in depression. 
—"Right and Riches", $1.50 prepaid. Wilbur Pub- 
lishing Co., Pasadena. 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE 1908 

MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bail-Bearing Typebar Joint — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing oyer the common 
friction bearing. Our typebar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — .Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St,. Los Angeles, Cal. 




Plan to Visit, 



Yosemite 
Valley 



This Season 
NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid 
the grandeurs of Yosemite. For through tickets 
and connections, see S. P. or Santa Fe agent, oc 
address, 

O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 



DuBois <Sb Davidson 

Furniture Company 

312-214 West, Sixth Street. Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

S5£r AT COST 

Lace Lurtains 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



Now Its Rawhide, Nevada 

Funny, isn't it? Here all of us had just settled down sal ■ the wonderful i mps at Tonopah, Gold- 

field, Bullfrog, and Beatty wuld maintain Nevada's name for richness an J quantity of gold produced when 
along comes a cowboy miner named Charley Holman, and produces Rawhide. It is not necessary — is it — 
to repeat that Rawhide, in proportion to its growth, is duplicating the other ricli amps of Nevada — and 
more. Rawhide stands today the wonder gold mining canrp of the world, and still it is in the cocoon state 

of development. The 
Angeles 




- 



Los 



Ex- 
press recently an- 
nounced: 

Rawhide Ship- 
ments Increase 

More ore is being 
shipped out of Raw- 
hide at the present 
time than at any 
period in the his- 
tory of that camp. 
Wednesday two 

tons were shipped 
from the Jordan 
lease of the Queen 
Mascot. Thirty tons 
are en route from 
the Grutt Hill mint. 
The Western 1 Ore 
Purchasing company 
of Hazen is sam- 
pling 300 sacks of 
high grade just re- 
ceived from the 
Czar lease on the 
Regent Mining com- 
pany's property, and 
there are 200 sacks 

more on the dump at the Czar ready for sacking and shipment. The McKinley lease on the same property 
has just shipped 115 sacks. 

The accompanying illustration shows a hoist being installed on the Rawhide King Hill Mining Com- 
pany's Coalition lease. The hoist is the Western type and was shipped from Los Amgeles. With the hoist 
in operation the work of opening the mine and getting it in shape for production will be greatly facilitated. 
The shaft which is a little over 130 feet deep is to be continued to the 300 foot level where a station will 
be cut and a cross cut driven to open the rich vein of ore proved up at a depth of 65 feet. With the present 
plan of development consummated the King Hill will become one of the steady producers of high grade 
milling ore in Rawhide. 

The accompanying illustration serves to show what the King Hill hasn't done more than what it has 
done. Plenty of ore is at hand. What we want is money to help get it out. If we had the money ourselves 
we wouldn't ask for any. All our money is in this mine and lease, and we are glad of it. 

The public now-a-days is demanding results. The era of the promoter with the red vest and diamond 
solitaire and "mining claim" is passing. The Rawhide King Hill Mining Company is getting results, and 
will continue to get results for every dollar invested with it. 

The property is located on Silver King hill, inside of the city limits of Rawhide, and comprises a part 
of the coalition's purchase, right in the center of the proven district. The company is operating on three 
blocks of 300 feet square each, nearly seven acres. There are rich stringers of ore all the way down the shaft, 
and the entire dump of about 200 tons is all millable ore. 

At 65 feet in the cross-cut a seven foot quartz ledge was opened up that gave values of from $12 to 
$1,000 per ton, which will average about $100 per ton. Picked samples run up in the thousands. 

This company also owns claim Mohawk No. 1, of 20 acres, just back of Balloon hill, and adjoining the 
famous Jordan lease which recently sold for $25,000. No work is being done on this claim yet but leasers 
will be put to work on it soon. It is believed to foe very rich and will become a big producei. 

This company is officered by experienced mining men, who are on the ground giving their personal 
attention to the supervision of the work now being done. L. W. Klinker, President, J. E. Burney, Vice- 
President, E. C. Klinker, Secretary and Manager, C. J. Klinker, Treasurer and Mine Superintendent. 

Capital stock $1,000,000 divided into 1,000,000 shares, par value $1. 400,000 shares Treasury stock to be 
sold for developing and opcating purposes as needed. Only 50,000 shares now on sale at 30 cents a share. 
The company reserves right to advance price without notice. Stock will be issued as orders are received. 
In event of oversubscription of this allotment money will be refunded. The recent rich strike on the Grutt Hill 
Mint adjoins us on the north and is on the same claim. For further information call on or address 

J. E. MEYER, Pacific Savings Bank 

202 Mercantile Place Los Angeles, Cal. 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By PerSZ Fiei.d 
New Books at the Public Library 

The additions to the library this week are of more 
interest than usual. Most of the volumes can only 
be mentioned by name. Perhaps the mosit import- 
ant work is in ten volumes : The World's Best 
Poetry, from the press of Morris, Philadelphia. Each 
volume contains poems .about The Higher Life, 
Fancy and other relations of the spirit to life. 

*Napoleon's Conquest of Prussia, 1806, by F. Lor- 
aine Peitre (Lane, 1907), with an introduction by 
Field Marshall Earl Roberts, adds another book to 
the increasing bulk of interesting Napoleonic litera- 
ture. 

*The Mother of California, by Arthur Walbridge 
North, has already been noticed in a previous issue 
of the Pacific Outlook. 

*The Inquisition in, the Spanish Dependencies 
(Sicily, Naples, Sardina, Milan, The Canaries, Mex- 
ico. Peru and New Granada), by Henry Charles Lea 
(Macmillan, 1908), is an extension of a history of 
the Inquisition in Spain by the same author, and 
an equally striking picture of the horrid injustice 
of power in human hands defiled by immunity. To 
read the account one is filled with the nausea of 
peace and a sickening feeling that by whacks alone 
can man be purified — submissive to the courtesies 
which cost. 

Historic Dress in America, 1607,1800, by Eliza- 
beth McClellan (Jacobs,; 1904), is a fully illustrated 
study of. old clothes, of Ithe pretensions which have 
not survived — a sketch of corset strings which have 
been cut forever. Other historical volumes are 
Russia and Spain of the Great Nations of Europe 
series, and Seville, by A. F. Calvert, of the Spanish 
Series of illustrated monographs. 

*China and Arnlerica Today, by Arthur H. Smith 
(Revell, 1907), is a study of the relations between 
this country and China, and has an almost local in- 
terest for dwellers in California. 

*The Land of Pardons, (Macmillan, 1906), by 
Anatole Le Braz, is a rambling description of Brit- 
(tany reviving in the reader visions of that quaint 
and tender-sad province where fogs and fairies 
loiter and where acquaintance with despair is ever 
renewed by the encircling sea. 

*Socialism Inevitable, by Gaylord Wilshire, is a 
reprint of Wilshire editorials and contains some 
spritely pages convincing and otherwise. The fable 
of "Hop Lee and the Peiican" is well told. The au- 
thor's fondness for pithy argument is fully in evi- 
dence. « . 

The Continent of Opportunity (Revell, 1907), by 
Francis E. Clark, is another study of South America 
of which we have noticed several lately, and of 
which this one is apparently not the best. 

The Cry of the Children, by Mrs. John Van Vorst 
(Moffat, 1908), is an account of the conditions of 
child labor in the factories of Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Georgia and Alabama. "There are," says 
Mrs. Van Vorst, "at work in the United States over 
a million and a half children between the ages of 
ten and fifteen; twenty-five' per cent of all textile 
operatives in the South are under sixteen ; two thou- 
sand girls under thirteen are doing night work in 
Pennsylvania." The author visited the mills in per- 
son and speaks from experience at first hand. 

Arthur Christopher Bensen has written an appre- 



ciation of Alfred Tennyson (Dutton, 1907), and Sid- 
ney Lee writes on Shakespeare's Life and Work 
(Macmillan, 1904). 

Three plays by Henrik Ibsen are in Vol. I of his 
collected works just issued by Scribners (1908). 
They are Lady Luger of Ostrat, The Feast of Sol- 
houg and Love's Comedy. 

American Birds, by William Lovell Finley (Scrib- 
ners, 1907), is a popular handbook about our 
feathered friends, studied and photographed from 
life by one who evidently loves them. 

The scientific books are '"Introduction to Astron- 
omy, by Forest Ray Moultfon (Macmillan, 1906) ; 
Introduction to the Study of Electrical Engineering, 
by Henry H. Norris (Wiley, 1907), and Railroad 
Engineers' Practice, by Thomas M. Cleemann 
(1892). 

The True Science of Living, by Edward Hooker 
Dewey (Haskell, Norwich, 1904), contains valuable 
suggestions in regard to hygiene. The author ad- 
vocates the late breakfast or n'p breakfast plan and 
claims that "there is no natural hunger in the morn- 
ing after a night of restful sleep. . . . Sleep is not 
a hunger-causing process," therefore a "square" 
meal at dawn is not needed by our adventurous 
stomachs. 

*Books recommended. 




Exclusive 
Woman's Hatter 
French and Eng'lisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers .realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL. COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



J. E. MEYER 

Stochs, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE SECURITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Fads About a Rotary Gas Engine 

And Why 

YOU SHOULD INVEST 

In the Stock of THE LOS ANGELES GAS ENGINE CO. 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



Advantages of a Rotary Gas Engine for Automobiles 



It IS air-cooled, absolutely. 

It. runs more slowly on high gear than any FOUR 

or SIX. 
It picks up speed faster and more easily on the 

throttle. 
It has practically NO vibration. 
It runs with a silence unknown to the FOUR or 
SIX. 

It makes gear shifting almost unnecessary. 
It has no equal for hill climbing. 



It weighs only one-third as much as the ordinary 

motor. 
It costs only two-thirds as much to build it. 
It does away with reciprocation. 
It has a simple and positive lubrication system. 
It has no fly wheel. 
It has no radiator. 
It has no water pump. 
It has no water piping. 
It has no water jackets on the cylinders. 
It has no cooling fans. 



Why We Recommend that You Become Interested in the Los Angeles 

Rotary Gas Engine Company 

Because this company will manufacture a type of engine for which there is already a world-wide de- 
mand, and owing to the fact that the rotary engine is adapted to so many purposes and the cost of construc- 
tion as compared with the vertical type of engine is so materially reduced, by reason of the elimination of 
many parts, the profits of the company are bound to be large. 

Because this company has passed the experimental stage, having perfected its engine in every particular, 
and is now ready to place its product on the market, thereby insuring to tihe investor quick returns on his 
investment. 

Because the Los Angeles Rotary Gas Engine Company is a home industry and is managed by local busi- 
ness men of integrity and business ability, which fact insures cautious business methods and honest hand- 
ling of funds. 

Because at the present time there is hardly any ot'her line of industry making as large profits as the 
automobile manufacturers, and although we cannot honestly state 'how large our profits will be it is fair to 
state that many automobile concerns declared dividends this year ranging frqm twenty-five to two hundred 
per cent; and what others have done with an article of less merit than ours we at least should equal with 
our superior product. 

The company is capitalized for $1,000,000.00, divided into 100,000 shares of the par value of $10.00 each. 
We propose to sell the first 2,000 shares at $2.50 a share. We request that you give our proposition most 
careful investigation and that you act quickly if you wish a block of this stock at the low price quoted. 

The officers and directors of the compay arc: 

WILLIAM E. BROWN. President. H. P. HITCHCOCK, Secretary. 

JOSEPH R. LOFTUS, Vice-president. M. E. BROWN, 

F. E. WOODLEY, Treasurer. F. WINSTANLEY. 

GEORGE H. LEWIS. 

For Full Particulars See JHE ACKERLY COMPANY Financial Agents 

538 South Broadway 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



The New Birth 

By Dorothy Russem, Lewis 
The call of the silent morn, 

And the dawn unfurled, 
And the tremble of waking, borne 

O'er a sleeping world. 

The call of Eternal Life 

And a glimpse of God, 
And His children freed from strife, 

And redeemed from sod. 

* <■ + 

The Answer 
By Q. M. 

My garden? — it shall be the dwelling place 
Of peace, where tired heartsi may rest; the light 
Of God's eternal love shall put to flight 
All murmured calumnies; and all the grace 
Of gentle courtesy will soon efface 
The bitterness of every fancied slight; 
Laughter and joy and unrestrained delight 
Must dwell therein and mingle with the lace 
That bough and fern leaf weave; in the cool shade 
The flow'rs tell fragrant secrets to the breeze 
And song-birds make a dainty serenade — 
A perfect tribute sung with joyous ease. 

Thus shall my garden be a haven fair 

To those whom man would burden with despair. 

* ' * * 
The Satyr 

The S'atyr lived in times remote, 
A shape half-human and. half-goat, 
Who, having all man's faults combined 
With a goat's nature unrefined, 
Was not what you would call a bright 
Example or a shining light. 
Far be it from me to condone 
The Satyr's sins, yet I must own 
I like to think there were a few 
Good Satyrs who to heaven flew, 
Whom, when St. Peter, stern and proud, 
Beheld, he cried, "No goats allowed!" 
And slammed the gate so quickly to, 
Only their human halves got through; 
Whereat the kindly saint relented, 
And that's how cherubs were invented. 

— Oliver Herford, in The Century. 

* * * 

My Dog 

The curate thinks you have no soul; 

I know that he has none. But you, 
Dear friend! whose solemn self-control 

In our four-square, familiar pew, 

Was pattern to my youth — whose bark 
Called me in summer dawns to rove — 

Have you gone down into the dark 
Where none is welcome, none may love? 

I will not think those good brown eyes. 

Have, spent their light of truth so soon; 
But in some canine Paradise 

Your wraith, I know, rebukes the moon, 

And quarters every plain and hill, 
Seeking its master. ... As for me, 

This prayer at least the gods fulfill: 
That when I pass the flood,' and see 

Old Charon by the Stygian coast 
Take toll of all the shades who land, 

Your little, faithful, barking ghost 
May leap to lick my phantom hand. 

— St. John Lucas, in the Outlook. 

* + * 

Love is Blind but Not Deaf 
She smiles — my darling smiles and all 

The world is filled with light. 
She laughs — 'tis like the bird's sweet call 

In meadows fair and bright. 
She weeps — the world is cold and gray, 

Rain clouds shut out the view. 
She sings — I softly steal away 

And wait till she gets through. 

— Boston Transcript. 




Li 



issner 



Buildi 



ing 



524 South Spring St. 



Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



C| Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 






Pacific Outlook 




A FA 



©IF HUM©R 



t} Cr 




Journalistic Enterprise 
\ • thai bents anything 

that Yankee inventivi lorted from 

France. In a small \ dy was at 

work in the field r announced that in 

the busy season all the impor 

irt paragraph md that the remainder 
: would he smeared with a fly-kil pound 

id of printer-' ink. In a brie; article the editor said: 
"In this way we will be able to ~ive our readers appre- 
ciable advantages which are: l:r-t. the possibility ol 
learning al • of the day in a few minute?: second, 

the m lucing the plague of noisome insects which 

■l tlie countryside and disseminate a number of dis- 
K:insas City Journal. 

* * + 

Expensive Operation 
"I guess pa must have passed a lot of time at the den- 
when he was in New York.'' said Johnny Green. 
"Why do you think so?" queried his ma. '"Cause I heard 
him tell a man todaj ' ial ii cost him nearly $300 to get 
hi- eye-tOOth cut," replied Johnny — Chicago News. 

+ * + 

Sunday School Philosophy 

\ Sunday school teacher had instructed her class that 
each child should repeat a verse of Scripture when the of- 
fering was made. The plate containing many pennies 
had g' ii; down the line when the child next the last said, 
"The Lord loveth a cheerful giver," depositing a nickel. 

Either the verses had given out or the child at the end 
of the bench was overcome at her neighbor's generosity, 
for she said, "A fool and hith money are thoon parted." — 
Lippincott's. 

Jumping at Conclusions 

In the amiable way of villagers, they were discussing the 
matrimonial affairs of a couple who. though recently wed, 
had begun to find the yoke of Hymen a burden. " 'Tis 
all along o' these hasty marriages." opined one caustic old 
gentleman who had been much to the fore in the discus- 
1 "They did not understand each other; they'd nobbut 
knowed each other for a matter o' seven years." "Well, 
that seems long enough," said an interested lady listener. 
"Long eno'! Bah, ye're wrong! When a body's coortin' 
he carina be too careful. Why. my coortship lasted a mat- 



ter o nineteen years 



"You certainly were careful,' 



agreed the lady listener. "And did you find your_ plan 
successful when you married?" "Ye jump to conclusions." 
said the old man, impatiently. "I understood her then, so 
I didn't marry her." — Illustrated Bits. 
+ * * 
Through the Door 
Hix — I always have Dr. Ennlec. When my mother-in- 
law was at death's door he pulled her through. 

Dix — Which way did he pull her? — St. Louis Republic. 

* * * 

The "Direct Wire" 

Editor of great city daily (to his assistant): 
"Billy, have you finished that 'special' from Washing- 
ton yet?" 

"Not quite. I had to write one from Chicago, a letter 
from our correspondent in Paris, the Wall street story 
and that stuff from Lincoln, Neb. I'll finish the Wash- 
ington 'special' in a few minutes. By the way. do you 
want anything from New York about the Harriman deal 
in Los Angeles — a denial or anything of that sort? Seems 
to me that we ought to set people right about that mat- 
ter." 

* * + 

Her Itinerary 

'Yes; I am going abroad." "And 'how are you going to 
arrange your itinerary?" "Oh. pompadour. I think that 
will be most suitable for traveling."— Washington Herald. 



A Crowded Universe 
In New Haven tin' 1 ii a graduating class once 

went to a local jeweler with .1 commission lor a class 
They had in view a design representing a youthful 
al e surveying the unn ei 

"Ali. .lit how large would |i< the figure v " the jeweler 

asked 

"Well." -mil the spokesman, "we thought the graduate 
ought 1.. cover about three-quarter! ol the badge, and the 
universe the r.'-i "-—Success, 

+ + + 

Death's Lurking Place 

A Kansas boy drank a pint of whiskey, went swimming, 
ate a lot of green apples, drank a quart of ice water, then 
died. 

If this is not proof of the danger which lurks in ice 
water in hot weather, what will you have? 

His Steady Job 

"How's your husband doing?" said the pale woman. 

" 'Bout the same," answered the thin woman. 

"Hasn't he got any regular work yet?" 

"Yes. He said he felt the need of some steady occupa- 
tion. So he thought he'd make it his business to wind the 
clock." 

"Did he stick to it?" 

"For awhile. But now he's kicking for an eight-day 
clock." 

+ * * 

What's in a Yawn? 

At one of the clubs an old timer, a clever chap, was be- 
ing frightfully bored by his vis-a-vis at the table in the 
cafe one night, the latter individual 'being as dull as the 
former was bright. The talk was fast becoming unendur- 
able, when the first named member chanced to observe a 
man at the other end of the dining room yawning in a 
manner that threatened to dislocate his jaws. "Look!" 
he exclaimed in desperation, "we are overheard!" — Dundee 
Advertiser. 

The Rothschilds Way 

A New Orleans man said the other day of the great 
house of the Rothschilds: 

"The Rothschilds push their strictness to the point of 
eccentricity. They once had for agent here in New Or- 
leans a fine fellow. They telegraphed to this agent at a 
certain season to sell their cotton holdings, but he knew 
the price would go higher and therefore he didn't sell till 
four days later. In consequence he netted an extra profit 
of $40,000 to his firm. 

"When he sent the Rothschilds the money and told 
them joyously what he had done they returned the whole 
amount, with a cold note that said: 

"The $40,000 you made by disobeying our instructions is 
not ours, but yours. Take it. Mr. Blank, your successor, 
sails for New Orleans today." 

+ + + 
Dry 

The baby hippopotamus at the zoo turned restlessly, 
opened its eyes and poked its nose up against its mother's 
cheek. 

"What do "i t tie tootsey-wootsey want?" asked mama 
tenderly. 

"I want dink water." 

* + + 

The Oldest of Professions 

An old friend of the family had dropped' in to see a 
young lawyer w*hose father was still paying his office rent. 

"So you are now practicing law," the old friend said, 
genially. 

"No, sir." said the candid youth. "I appear to be. but 
I am really practicing economy." — Youth's Companion. 



U/ie Big 
Exclusive 
Piano House 

•J Better values and better goods are 
always found at an exclusive establish- 
ment. We are an Exclusive Piano 
House. 

Our Leader— A. B. Chase 

(^ We made no mistake when we 
placed the A. B. Chase at the head of 
our list of fine 

PIANOS 

The Big Exclusive Piano House 

BARTLETT 

MUSIC 

CO. 



231-233-235 
SOUTH BROADWAY 
Opposite 



City Hall 






Piliim^ DMlLDDiL 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 



G»»r## Baker Jtnderton 
C01TOH 



H. C. Jiekerly 

PRCSIDENT 



Published every Saturday 
Hammer Bulld.ng, Lot Jtnwelet. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Smbscrtpilmn prlcm S3.00 a year in advance. Single copy S 
cents on all newt ttandt. 
Entered •• trcond-cltu nillct April 5, 19^-, it (be potto Ifiee at Loi Anjelei, 
California, Bndet the act of Congrcu of March |, 1B79. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

Tin- Pm-in*' Outlook in Dialled i<> nlMwrlbeM through the 
l.o* A hki-Icm l*»nt oilii-i- eicrj Kridnv, nnd Mhnuld be de- 
livered In every pari of tin- city by Snturdny'i* pout. If for 
auy rcnuon It »hould be delayed, or be delivered la poor 
••iniillil.in, HiibncrllierM will confer ii fnvor upon the publishers 
by giving them Immediate notice. 

Vol. S Los Jrngetes, Cat., Jtugust 29. 1908 Mo. 9 



A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

Heaven on Earth 

Let the weakest, let the humblest remembet 
that in his daily course he can, if he will, shed 
around him almost a heaven. Kindly words, 
sympathizing attentions, watchfulness against 
wounding men's sensitiveness — these cost very 
little but they are priceless in their value. — F. W. 
Robertson. 



* ICXXX+iCXXXXX tCX+KSHCX xxxx* 

PARTICULAR NOTICE 
JShe Pacific OutlooK's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or locai interest. 



COMMENT 



NO MAN can serve two masters. Morality and 
vice cannot go hand in hand. The struggle in hu- 
man thought in official circles will result, in time, 
in a definite choice between the two masters, vice 
and purity. The point on which the decision should 
hinge, in the administration of 
To the Powers public affairs as in private life, is: 
That Be which will produce the most pro- 

fitable results to the administrator 
as well as to those whose representative he is sup- 
posed to be? The greatest and most enduring sat- 
isfaction must arise from the knowledge of good 



deeds performed, in the individual; in fidelity to a 
public trust in the official, These words arc in- 
tended chiefly for the ears of Mayor Harper, the 
members of the Police Commission and the chief 
of the police department. They arc written to en- 
courage them to stand fast in the attitude they have 

assumed toward the interests which aim at the de- 
struction of official morality in Los Angeles, which 
would undermine civic health, drag municipal pride 
through the mire of baudy-house rule and ultimately 
bring ruin to those allowing themselves to be made 
instruments for the perpetuation of this species of 
government. The instinct of self-preservation in 
itself should actuate them to shun the fountain from 
which naught but evil flows, and to refuse to be 
bullied by the devil into accepting a commission as 
officers of his host. 

* <• + 

Sentiment is not the basis of true and enduring friend- 
ship. Be of some service to your fellow-men if you would 
keep friends. 

* * * 

LET US have peace! All this agitation of poli- 
tical conditions in California, that the rottenness 
may be brought to light and finally separated from 
the healthv elements of the body politic, "hurts 
business". Let us cease the crusade for the purifica- 
tion of the city, the county, the state! It "hurts 
business". Let us leave the rogues alone, now that 
they have exhibited their superior strength ; let us 
not do anything that will invite the necessity for 
another strenghening of the bulwarks they have 
erected, that will cause further trepida- 
Peace at tion in the ranks of the interests who 
Any Price look to them for defense and succor. It 
"hurts business". Let us have no more 
of this useless effort toward popular government ; 
let us concede, once and for all, that we have a mas- 
ter who is a MASTER — that the best thing for us 
all to do is to bow in meek submission to his will, 
abandoning all attempts to free our necks from his 
heel. To do otherwise "hurts business". Let us 
fiddle while California burns. To do anything else 
"hurts business". Cringe, ye cowards ! Sweat, ye 
slaves! Burn, ye martyrs! But, for love of your 
Southern Pacific masters, do nothing further that 
may "hurt business". Remember San Francisco — 
and give us peace at any price! 

THE MOVEMENT to lift the bench entirely out 
of politics will be accompanied by numerous ob- 



Pacific Outlook 



structive tactics, and like every other project aim- 
ing at reform doubtless will not be entirely success- 
ful at first. But there is little doubt that the time 
will come, in every state in the Union when the 
judiciary will be non-partisan, so far as the voters 
may make it so. There was a time when the courts 
were generally regarded as free from contamination 
by partisan politics. Even the politicians them- 
selves understood this fact, and the 
Elevating wisest of them left the judges alone. 
the Bench But the removal of the judiciary from 
the province of executive appointment 
and the shortening of the tenure of office, convert- 
ing judgeships into political playthings, is an ex- 
periment which has proven an unequivocal failure, 
causing many a man to lose all faith in the possible 
progress of democracy in America. An eminent 
jurist, a great and just judge, Chief Justice Shaw of 
the Massachusetts Supreme Bench, said, upon his 
retirement, in addressing the bar of that state : 
"Never give up your custom of appointing judges 
for life. It is the one safeguard against their loss 
of independence arid integrity." 

* * + 

IT LOOKS like a great deal to expect, that voters 
will ever be allowed or encouraged by the profes- 
sional politicians to relinquish their power of re- 
taining or turning out judges, at the time when 
these officals have just begun to be accustomed to 
the judicial attitude; but greater things have been 
accomplished. We cannot fail to recognize the fact 
that under the existing system the necessity of ap- 
pealing to the electorate and to the professional poli- 
ticians causes judges to descend from the bench, as 

it were, and, by truckling to the men 

Much to who hold the fate of these judges in 

Expect ';heir hands, thereby disgrace the exalted 

offices they hold. So hardened have we 
become to the spectacle of a judge "playing poli- 
tics", as nearly in secret as is possible, working 
through his friends, as a rule, that the disgrace in 
it no longer appears so keen as would have been in 
earlier days. But when we stop to think seriously 
on what this means, are we not able to arrive at 
an explanation of many devious meanderings of the 
goddess who is popularly supposed to attend to her 
business with her eyes blinded ? 

* * * 

IT MAY NOT BE during the lifetime of the 
present generation that we shall return to the old 
system, but much may be accomplished by con- 
ferring upon the electorate an opportunity to select 
for the bench men who are known to be fitted for 
this high position, rather than that such selection 
should be based upon the candidates' political affil- 
iations, or, worse than all else, upon his ability to 



please the politicians. The plan adopted by the 
Bar Association, to place all candi- 
Polidcians dates for judicial honors on a non- 
the Only Bar partisan ticket, approximates the 
ideal one. If this be done and the 
decent element in the legal fraternity continue to 
demand that the bench shall be kept remote from 
partisanship, it will be less difficult, at some time in 
the future, to prevail upon the political bosses to 
remove their hands from the heads of the occupants 
of the bench. But so long as the post of judge re- 
main a political plaything, as it not infrequently is 
at this time, we cannot reasonably anticipate the dis- 
pensation of absolute justice, the retention of inde- 
pendence and integrity by all occupants of the 
bench. 

* * * 

The service of luxury is to render your enemies toler- 
able. Sorbet au kirsch before an underdone roast sooths 
the asperities engendered by kidney stew served as an 
entree. 

* * ••• 

BUT ONCE since its establishment has the Pa- 
cific Outlook felt it expedient or wise to comment 
upon murder cases. The less said of crimes of this 
class the better. But the killing of William E. 
Annis by Captain Peter C. Hains, Jr., was surround- 
ed by circumstances of a nature so peculiar and of 
such intense interest to those who believe in the 
enforcement of the "unwritten law" that we believe 
the interests of the people will be conserved by a 
widespread discussion of the case. The only de- 
fense which it appears that the accused man will be 
able to make at his trial is that his victim had, 
wrecked Hains's home and that a husband is justi- 
fied in taking a man's life under such provocation. 

In many instances, possibly in 

"Unwritten the majority of them, this defense 

Law" Nonsense has been followed by acquittal. 

But in most such cases ther.e has 
been some element of surprise, or a sudden access 
of passion, giving color to the plea of "temporary 
insanity". In the Hains case no such ground can 
be held, however. There is no sudden impulse in 
the case of a man who first enters suit for divorce 
in order to rid himself of a wife of whom he has 
wearied, afterward decides to take the law into his 
own hands, travels a long distance to find his wife's 
lover and then deliberately kills the offender, while 
his brother stands off those who would save the in- 
tended victim. We do not believe the "unwritten 
law" intends that a man shall deliberately hunt 
down any man and kill him, with the assistance of 
another, in any spot where he may find him, and at 
any time after the offense which has inspired the 
lust for blood has been committed. 

* * * 
AMERICANS are not yet willing to inject into 

their code of morals — or immorals — any such prin- 



Pacific Outlook 



this. What the court decides in this par- 
ticular case will be vastly i 1 "re important than the 
his brother, who connived 

at the murder. Hains killc 1 another man yen- ago 
and escaped punishment, u< spite of the overwhelm- 
ing public sentiment that he should have been sent 
rison, if not hanged. Alter a man lias com- 
mitted one murder and gone free, it is natural 
enough For him to anticipate dismissal after trial 
for having obeyed what we call the "unwritten law." 
Hams doubtless believed that. 
It Makes For simply because he pro i kill 

Anarchism and did kill the man who had alien- 
ated his wife's affections, public 
sentiment would be with him. Unfortunately he 
had some grounds for this belief. There are plenty 
of people who are prone to encourage crime of this 
sort — acting on the old law of an eye for an eye. a 
tooth for a tooth. — men who would resent as an in- 
sult the charge that such doctrine is one of the chief 
foundation -him- of anarchism. Nothing is so de- 
signed to inculcate a widespread contempt for the 
administration of the law as the common expression 
of opinion that a man is jusified in murdering to 
avenge a wrong. It is to he hoped that the trial 
court before which the Hains case is called will es- 
tablish this principle definitely. 
* + + 
APROPOS of this case the Brooklyn Eagle re- 
marks sarcastically: "In the old days a man avenged 
his personal honor, when his home was invaded, by 
challenging to a duel the one who had injured him. 
Of course, this custom had its disadvantages; not 
infrequently the guilty shot straighter than the inno- 
cent and the victim's honor was laid away with him 
in some obscure corner of a convenient churchyard. 
Still, the misguided people of that time thought 
they distinguished a certain indispensable chivalry 
in a practice that inferentially insisted upon a meas- 
ure of fair play in homicide. Modern civilization 
in this country and in England long ago denounced 
and abolished dueling. Civilization on the con- 
tinent of Europe is gradually veering toward a 
similar policy. We have newer and 
That Handy more effective methods, by following 
Institution which a man may make sure that his 
honor will be satisfied without even 
a suggestion of peril to himself. All that it is neces- 
sary for him to do is to procure a pistol, and, after 
testing it thoroughly, find his intended victim un- 
der circumstances precluding either explanation or 
resistance. One or more shots will then meet the 
requirements of the case. Afterward may come the 
appeal to that handy institution, the Unwritten 
Law, and the legal besmirchment of one who is be- 
yond the power to reply. It was different in the 
old days, but the old days were admittedly cruel and 
barbarous. Any one with half an eye can see that 
the modern method of avenging one's honor is a dis- 



tinct advance Ovei : custom. The purblind 

ami nearly huh who insist that ap 

the Unwritten Law should he met. at lea-t occa- 
sionally, by hanging the appellants should he dealt 
with tenderly a- ;! . mild and harmless 

delusion." 

+ + + 
Seasickness is caused by a moving sky line, the disequili- 
brium of gravity or its opposite, which is gaiety. There- 
fore seasickness is the mirth of the stomach, the sport of 
merry victuals., the merriment of soup. Nothing sad, you 
see — only dinners jolly on their own account see'.cing 
dancing tides. 

+ + + 

JUDGE BORDM ELL of the Superior Courl of 
Los Angeles count) ha- had something to saw offi- 
cially, regarding divorces, which should he taken 
to heart not only by those who think they see in 
some act or acts of their matrimonial partners suffi- 
cient cause for permanent separation, but likewise 
by every judge. Divorces have become altogether 
too common and too easy to procure in California, 
as in some other states. Judge Bordwell thinks the 
time to call a halt has come. He declares: "It takes 
something more than mere preponderance of evi- 
dence in a divorce case to justify 
Judge Bordwell the granting of a decree. The 
on Divorce charge must be made out by 

satisfactory evidence — the pub- 
lic interest demands this. If the mind .is free from 
doubt it is the duty of the court to award a decree, 
though the interest of society may suffer thereby. 
We sometimes hear discussion of the question 
whether the interest of society is favored or harmed 
by divorce. This is not a debatable subject in the 
courtroom. It is settled, as a matter of law, by the 
highest courts of the land that divorces are injuri- 
ous to society — a disruption of the very foundation 
of society itself." 

+ * ♦ 

Dislikes, like lemon water, are better frozen: cooled in 
the rigidity of conventional manners they become crys- 
taline. 

* + * 

FORMER MAYOR James D. Phelan of San 
Francisco will become persona non grata in his own 
city if he doesn't watch out. San Francisco news- 
papers delight in referring to the provincialism of 
Los Angeles. They seem to get more pleasure out 
of their ridicule of the "pretensions" of this city 
than almost anything else. When they learn what 
one of their leading citizens has had to say about 
this measley little village we reckon they will call 
upon loyal San Franciscans assemble in mass meet- 
ing and take him to task. Here is Mr. Phelan's 

tribute to Los Angeles : "Apart from 
In for a politics I would like to say that Los An- 
Scoring geles is a continual source of surprise to 

me. The street life and the spirit of the 
people indicate prosperity and contentment. Not 



Pacific Outlook 



in Paris or in New York will you find better or more 
attractive stores and well kept streets, beautifully 
lighted without the obstruction of poles. I wish 
the San Francisco supervisors could come here and 
see what Los Angeles has accomplished." 

* * * 

If you want to keep your friends, don't be gloomy and 
pessimistic. 

* * * 

RICHARD CROKER is referred to by certain 
Dublinites, who evidently have been dazzled by the 
crooked American eagles he has held before their 
eyes with hypnotic intent, as "a distinguished per- 
son who has rendered service to Ireland". Just 
what service he has rendered to the country of his 
forefathers does not appear. But that he once ren- 
dered a conspicuous service to America informed 
and candid men will agree. That service took the 

form of departure for that bourne 

Distinguished whence, most Americans fondly 

Service hope, this particular traveler will 

nevermore return. It is disgust- 
ing to find men of the quality of this notorious ex- 
boss lauded as the authors of "distinguished ser- 
vices" to anybody or anything but themselves. 
Croker, like W. Waldorf Astor, regards America as 
an unfit place of residence for a gentleman. Let 
America keep itself so for gentlemen of his -stripe — 
or should we say stripes? How soon, indeed, does 
the world forget a rogue's past after he has accu- 
mulated the wherewithal to purchase entree into 
the courts in one end of which may be beheld the 
seats of the mighty! 

* * * 

Women who want to smoke argue that it is all right, 
because the Queen of Portugal smokes. But so do the 
female denizens of the district of which Commercial 
street,, Los Angeles, is the center. 

* * * 

MANY OTHERWISE thoughtful men do not 
always exhibit complete sanity when discussing 
monopolies. Not infrequently do we find them 
condemning all forms of monopoly, whether ex- 
perience has taught that certain forms sometimes 
are beneficial or the contrary. Not long since the 
New York Public Service Commission declared 
with some qualifications, that monopolies were not 
always detrimental, whereat a roar of protest arose 
from the "reform" element among the politicians of 
that state. A careful reading of the opinion ex- 
pressed by this commission shows that it meant to 
convey the idea that regulated monopolies were not 

always detrimental to the welfare of 
Not Always the public. The commission erred, 
Detrimental we believe, in not making it plain 

that, in its judgment, monopolies con- 
ducted under strict governmental supervision were 
not detrimental but, on the contrary, were frequent- 
ly advisable. There are many forms of properly 



regulated monopolies which should be sustained by 
government. These include such institutions as gas 
and electric companies and other public service cor- 
porations. Without strict regulation they frequent- 
ly exert a baneful influence. Regulated by commis- 
sions composed of men who have the correct con- 
ception of the functions of corporate bodies and of 
government, they may be made to prove of greater 
value to the community than unrestricted competi- 
tion. The subject is one worthy of the attention of 
all profound students of economics. 
* * * 
The "World's Prog'ress 

The feeling is growing in Washington that Japan 
must soon make a positive declaration of her inten- 
tions in the Far East. Official distrust of the mikado's 
government is spreading among American officials. 
Since the development of the troubles culminating 
in the San Francisco school imbroglio* and the Van- 
couver riots many observant men have believed the 
necessity of establishing our eastern policy on a 
firmer basis to be acute. The favor felt for the 
Japanese during their war with Russia seems en- 
tirely effaced, and there is now rapidly forming in 
its place a natonal sentiment demanding the taking 
of steps to curb what are believed to be the ambi- 
tions of Japan, and especially to safeguard the com- 
mercial interests of the United States in China. 

By common consent, the entire population of At- 
lantic City, N. J., has refused to obey the Sunday- 
closing law relative to saloons. . The mayor, the 
police, the political boss, the press and even the 
leaders among the religious element have refused to 
assist in the enforcement of the law. The situation 
is said to be without parallel. 

Vice-Consul George E. Chamberlin sends from 
Singapore the report that Chinese residents at Pa- 
cific coast. ports are subscribing to a Chinese nation- 
al steamship company which purposes to enter into 
the transpacific carrying trade with a line to San 
Francisco or Seattle. 

A moonlight balloon excursion was enjoyed the 
other day by a party of Philadelphians. This was 
the first event of the kind ever held in the world. 
The balloon was equipped with electric flashlights 
and a wireless telegraph receiving instrument. 

George R. Sheldon, treasurer of the 'Republican 
National Committee, says that it is up-hill work 
getting funds for the Taft campaign, on account of 
the decision to publish the names of all contributors. 

W. H. Lewis, a negro, is said to be slated for ap- 
pointment as assistant attorney-general of the 
United States. He is now assistant United States 
attorney at Boston. 

French manufacturers declare that Americans are 
now buying almost nothing in the way of French 
silks, but are depending upon American goods. 

The United States consul at Brussels says that 
horse meat is used extensively as human food in 
Belgium. 

The national labor unions are said to be prepar- 
ing to join in the fight against the theatrical trust. 

An opera written in Esperanto was produced in 
Berlin August 22 with entire success. 



Pacific Outlook 




Another Story by Hans Christian Andersen "Which May Be Made 

to Fit Almost Anywhere 



l» VKi)R (, L ^'' l ' u ' garden ran a hedge of ha 
ffifijR I'.eyond this hedge I:i> fields and iiionlmvs. 
- wherein were cows and sheep; but in the 
midst of the garden stood a blooming Rose 

Tree: and under this Rose Tree lived a 
Snail, who had a good deal in his shell — namely, 
himself. 

"Wait till my time comes,'' he said: "I shall do 
ething more than produce roses, hear nuts, or 
give milk, like the Rose Tree, the hazel hush, and 
the COWS !" 

"I expect a great deal of yon." said the Rose Tree. 
"But may I ask when it will appear?" 

"1 take my time." replied the Snail. "You're al- 
ways in such a hurry. You don't rouse people's 
interest by suspense." 

When the next year came, the Snail lay almost 
in the same spot, in the sunshine under the Rose 
Tree, which again bore buds that bloomed into 
ro-es. until the snow fell and the weather became 
raw and cold: then the Rose Tree bowed its head 
and the Snail crept into the ground. 

A new year began, and the roses came out, and 
the Snail came out also. 

"You're an old Rose Tree now." said the Snail. 
"You must make haste and come to an end, for you 
have given the world all that was in you. Whether 
it was of anv use is a question that I have had no 
time to consider: but so much is clear and plain. 
that you have done nothing at all for your own 
development, or you would have produced some- 
thing else. How can you answer for that? In a 
little time vou will be nothing at all but a stick. 
Do vou understand what I say?" 

"You alarm me!" replied the Rose Tree. "I never 
thought of that at all." 

"No, you have not taken the trouble to consider 
anything. Have vou ever given an account to 
yourself, why you bloomed, and how is it that your 
blooming conies about — why it is thus, and not 
otherwise?" 

"No," answered the Rose Tree; "I bloomed in 
gladness, because T could not do anything else. The 
sun shone and warmed me, and the air refreshed 
me. I drank the pure dew and the fresh rain, and I 
lived, I breathed. Out of the earth there arose a 
power within me, from above there came down a 
strength. I perceived a new ever-increasing happi- 
ness, and consequently I was obliged to bloom over 
and over again. That was my life. I could not do 
otherwise." 

"You have led a verv pleasant life," observed the 
Snail. 

"Certainly; everything I have was given to me." 
said the Rose Tree. "But more still was given to 
you. You are one of those deep, thoughtful charac- 
ters, one of those highly gifted spirits, which will 
cause the world to marvel." 

"I've no intention of doing anything of the kind," 



cried the Snail. "Tin- world is nothing to me. \\ hat 

have I to do with the world? I have enough of 
myself and in myself." 
"But must we not all. here on earth, give to 

Others the best that we have, and offer what lies in 

our power: Certainlj I have only given roses. But 
you — you who have been so richlj gifted — what 
have you given to the world? What do you intend 

io give ?" 
"What have I given? What do 1 intend to give"-' 

I spit at it. It's worth nothing. It's no business of 
mine. Continue to give your roses, if you like; you 
can't do anything better. Let the hazel bush bear 
nuts, and the COWS and ewes give milk — they have 
their public; but I have mine within myself — T re- 
tire within myself, ami there I remain. The world 
is nothing to me." 

And so saying, the Snail retired into his house, 
and closed up the entrance after him. 

"That is very sad," said the Rose Tree. "I can- 
not creep into myself, even if I wish it — I must con- 
tinue to produce roses. They drop their leaves, and 
are blown away by the wind. But I saw how a rose 
was laid in a matron's hymn-book, and one of mv 
roses had a place on the bosom of a fair young girl. 
and another was kissed by the lips of a child in the 
full joy of life. That did me good; it was a real 
blessing. That's my remembrance — my life!" 

And the Rose Tree went on blooming in inno- 
cence, wdiile the Snail lay and idled away his time in 
the house— the world did not concern him. 

And years rolled by. 

The Snail had become dust in the dust, and the 
Rose Tree was earth in the earth ; the rose of re- 
membrance in the hymn-book was faded, but in the 
garden bloomed fresh rose trees, and under the 
trees lay new snails; and these still crept into their 
houses, and spat at the world, for it did not concern 
them. 

Suppose we begin the story again, and read it 
right through. It will never alter. 

(And possibly some of us may clearly discern the 
moral as we read and read again.) 
+ + * 
The "If-isf * 

Grover Cleveland once declared that he was an 
optimist, but not "an if-isit". "An if-ist," said Mr. 
Cleveland, "is a person who is a slave to the little 
word if, whereas an optimist hopes for the best in 
a sane manner. The if-ist is never quite sane. I 
once knew an if-ist who was lost in ithe Maine woods 
with a companion on a hunting expedition. As 
night came on they made camp, but, although they 
were hungry, they had shot no game, and had 
nothing to eat. With a perfeatly serious face this 
fellow looked at his companion and said: 'If we only 
had some ham, we'd have ham and eggs, if we only 
had some eggs !' " 



8 



Pacific Outlook 



Interesting People, and OtHers 

By the Counselor of the 'Gods 

It is only people on the fringe of good society who 
are really interesting in a drawing room or those 
whose conduct seems to loiter on the outskirts of 
a coal yard. An infernal cleverness alone keeps so- 
cial favorites outside of prison bars. The women 
we like to be Seen with suffer from the fact that 
their visiting lists are catalogues of persons who, 
when united, form a dull company. - These dames 
can relieve their ennui and ours only by intercourse 
with felons who escape the saddening presence of 
a turnkey. 

Many of us call ourselves miserable sinners dur- 
ing the Sunday morning litany, only wishing, the 
while, that we had the moral courage to fulfill our 
desires, to. be in fact what we call ourselves in a fit 
of contrite fiction. In a material civilization the 
only possible joys are convivial ones, a fact which 
brings about the disrespect with which we regard 
respectability. Smug is a term of greater contempt 
than wicked, and a self-respect which is based on 
mob approval alone is only welcome at those so- 
cial routs where goodness is a tragic mask and veal 
turns celery into chicken salad. 

Expediency puts on the timid dress suit and dines 
in a suppressed grouch, garnished by the pains of 
repletion. The daring soul, who calls salad grass, 
and crams his pockets with cake at a joyful rural 
dance, is really the fellow we like best, if we are not 
afraid of his perspicuity nor of his frank epithets. 
He does not pretend enough for satined halls. He 
escapes the silliness of fixed speech and we tiptoe 
around him as fearful of his conversation as of the 
oracles of a soothsayer. We must gabble or go mad 
and we have therefore invented the social phrase 
book, the policy of lies, to replace an honest silence 
which seems to say, "My intuition tells me that you 
are nearly as bad as I am, if not worse, therefore 
I reserve comment on your tawdry adjectives." If 
we might remain silent unquestioned we could af- 
ford to be courteous. Intelligence is easier to at- 
tain to than wisdom, and more talkative. We never 
call a silent man civil. A rogue is always a clever 
chatterer, and if we are willing to pay the price he 
makes a charming companion, until we find out of 
what he has robbed us. None of us like to pay for 
a jolly half-hour if we can help it, as if bright talk 
(the dearest thing in the world) could be had for 
nothing. It is only a rasoal who can afford to be 
amusing. That is the reason we are so afraid to 
die, we are so sure of heaven that we dread to be- 
come shady bores, sporting in the fourth dimension. 
Gaiety is paid for furtively in a gambling, cheating, 
usurious fashion which thrifty folk with meager 
constitutions abhor. Fun is always a peep show. 

How dull is the cosmos at our feet, a common 
property, free to all — a grim perfection we can so 
little tease ! How jolly the morning scandal, the 
pinhole windows revealing the messing in others' 
lives — puddles we edge ! They are the extremes of 
morality in which we dare not , participate but 
around which we wallow, uttering ecstatic shrieks 
of "Horror!" 

* * * 

"ChurcHianity" 

By Adolph Roeder 
The idea that citizenship means simply voting is 
in itself as entirely erroneous as the idea that Chris- 
tianity means going to church on Sunday morning 
and one evening a week. The man who goes to 



church on Sunday and weighs out fourteen ounces 
to the pound on Monday, or makes a disgraceful 
political deal on Tuesday, or grinds the face of the 
poor all the rest of the week, or, in fact, does any- 
thing unmanly, lacks the proper understanding of 
the word "Christianity", and has substituted for it 
the word "churchianity", which, while it may be 
perfectly harmless in itself, is a dangerous substi- 
tute for the real article. lAind the man who thinks 
that citizenship means to drop a bit 'of paper into a 
box on a certain day and then go away, makes the 
same mistake as does his church confrere. Citi- 
zenship means to take reasonable cognizance of the 
ideas which make for civic betterment, both in the 
local field and in the larger fields of the county, the 
State and the country. 

* * * 

"Will"— In Epigram 

By Wiuiam George Jordan 

The backbone of character. 

Conscious concentration expressed in action. 

The divine gift that makes man his own second 
creator. 

The soul's heroic choice ofthe difficult. 

The angel that rolls away all stones from the path 
of purpose. 

Positive, aggressive, directing, conquering, power 
of the mind. 

The assertion of our kingship over our environ- 
ment. 

The hand' of power on the helm of purpose. 

The soul's guardian of conduct, conscience, and 
character. 

The individual mastery of self. 
+ + * 

Another Pronouncing' Test 

So much interest has been exhibited in the publi- 
cation by the Pacific Outlook of lists of words which 
are more or less frequently mispronounced that this 
paper is prompted to print further lists. If you are 
interested, try to pronounce the following additional 
words according to the best authorities : 
Rise (noun). Detail. Detestation. 

Cognomen. Homoeopathy. Contumely. 

Legendary. Acoustics. Recitative. 

Lethean. Environs. Leisurely. 

Coadjutor. Peremptory. Immobile. 

Erudite. Exemplary. Nomenclature. 

Epicurean. Indicatory. Molecular. 

Revolting. Implacable. Molecules. 

Sacrilegious. Fraternized. Soporific. 

* + + 

Neatly Done 

Senator La Follette, discussing the currency bill, 
said of a certain passage: "That needs delicate 
handling. It is like the position of the young man 
on his honeymoon. This young man's honeymoon 
was peculiar because, while still in mourning, he 
had married his dead wife's sister. A friend-of his, 
a chap he had not seen for years, accosted him on 
the honeymoon in a Niagara restaurant. The friend, 
after being introduced to the bride, said sym- 
pathetically: 

" 'But who are you in mourning for, old man?' 
" 'For my sister-in-law', was the delicate reply." 

* + * 

Punctuate THis Sentence 

Here is a sentence that has puzzled many a one 
who has tried properly to punctuate it. See what 
you can do with it : 

That that is is that that is not is not 



Pacific Outlook 




<-» 



l i \f >: 




Si, EMILIE F. STOWE 

A vari-colored web, its threads today 

O'er-shot with Hope's warm colors rose and gold, 

The morrow soiled with tears so dulled and gray. 

A problem 'tis that never has been solved 

By cloistered priest, philosopher or sage, 

Yet its lettering spelleth Pain to all. 

At morning-time, youth's halcyon high-tide, 

Such music is there in the heart, young feet 

So lightly skim along the blossom-path, 

With airy arrogance they seem to spurn 

The flints beneath frota whose sharp hurts 

The heart is bleeding 'ere the eventide. 

A little day of sunshine, song and dance, 

Then rise the mists, the lamps of Joy burn low, 

The ash of sorrows falling on the hair. 

Anon — alas, such brief, quick span it is — 

Two pulseless hands lie folded o'er a heart 

That ne'er again shall throb with joy or pain. 

A swift and silent flight through outer-court 

Of life — that vestibule to spheres beyond 

That men have mis-named Death — and lo! the rod 

Of pain we held in oft unwilling hands, 

With vision larger, clarified of tears, 

We see was really staff of radiant light, 

And in script all clear illumined we read 

The answer to our oft anguished prayer 

"Wherefore, O, our Father, wherefore!" 




fes^ 



A 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



SWEDENBORG, THE SCIENTIST 



Bgjj|*s HE removal of Swedenborg's body from 
1111111 London to Stockholm, after it had reposed 

'*'-** in the Swedish Lutheran Church in Lon- 
don for 136 years, is a part of a larger 
movement for the recognition of the great 
genius of Swedenborg in the domain of science, 
which has recently gained great impetus in his na- 
tive land. It is a curious fact that Swedenborg's 
philosophy has had a much wider influence in the 
world at large than in his native land. It has pro- 
foundly influenced the greatest writers of Germany, 
France, England and Aanerica. Many men of emi- 
nence in the domain of literature, science, philo- 
sophy and theology have acknowledged their in- 
debtedness to the philosopher of the north. 

The movement now on foot to honor the memory 
of Swedenborg on account of his great scientific 
attainments had its beginning outside of his native 
country. Dr. Max Neuburger of Vienna in 1901 
delivered an address before the assembly of Ger- 
man naturalists and physicians, entitled "Sweden- 
born 's References to the Physiology of the Brain." 
In his address Dr. Neuburger pointed out some of 
Swedenborg's most important conclusions in the 
field of cerebral physiology, in which he was far in 
advance of his time, and anticipated many modern 
discoveries. Thus he says : "He leaped a whole 
century ahead of his age by the announcement of 
another discovery, for he was the first one to show 
that the cortical substance of the brain is the ex- 
clusive seat of the higher psychical activity, the 
point of attack of the soul." The address concluded 
with the warmest expression of appreciation of the 
great genius of Swedenborg in his field of research, 
and the opinion was expressed that "this man, dur- 
ing the scientific period of his life, exhibited a pene- 
tration in various fields of research that is nothing 
less than magnificent." 

Following up this interest in Swedenborg, Dr. 
Neuburger addressed a communication to the Aca- 
demy of Sciences of Stockholm, in which he ex- 
pressed his regret that Swedenborg's extensive 
manuscript on the brain, which is preserved in the 
library of the Academy of Sciences, had not yet been 
published. This led to the appointment of a com- 
mittee to investigate the matter. Professor Dr. 
Gustaf Retzius, the chairman of the committee and 
president of the academy, made a study of the sub- 
ject of Swedenborg's physiological treatises. The 
results of this study he presented before the con- 
gress of anatomists at Heidelberg, May 29, 1903, in 
his address as president of that body. 

The committee of the Academy of Sciences now 
made a thorough examination of the manuscripts 
of Swedenborg, all of which had been deposited in 
its library by his heirs. This investigation brought 
to light a remarkable array of scientific and philo- 
sophcal works, many of which had never been pub- 
lished. They covered many fields of scientific re- 
search, included treatises on mathematics, chemis- 
try, metallurgy, magnetism, ontology and cos- 
mology, geology, paleontology, psychology and ana- 
tomy and physiology. There are over eighty titles, 
many of them bulky treatises, in which Swedenborg 



seemed to grasp the hidden causes of things. By his 
principles of vibration, degrees, series and order he 
reduced the various domains of science into a unified 
whole. Moreover, he anticipated by a century some 
of the scientific discoveries of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, especially in the field of anatomy and physi- 
ology. 

Dr. Retzius became so impressed with the value 
of these works that he proposed to the Academy of 
Sciences to issue an edition of Swedenborg's scien- 
tific and philosophical works, and offered to bear 
the expense of the first three volumes himself. The 
first volume of this series has just been issued from 
the press. It contains Swedenborg's contributions 
to geology and a number of his letters. The preface 
is by Dr. Retzius and the eminent paleontologist 
and geologist, Professor Alfred G. Nathors, has 
written the introduction, in which he gives a lucid 
analysis of Swedenborg's contributions to geology 
in that early stage of the science, and gives him 
high praise. Volume II will contain treatises on 
chemistry, physics and mechanics ; and Volume III 
on cosmology. Four other volumes are planned, 
two on the brain and two on physiology. 

The movement to transfer Swedenborg's body 
from England to Sweden originated when the fact 
was made known that the church in London in 
which his body rested was to be torn down. The 
question then arose, what should be done with his 
remains. The Swedish Government requested of 
the British Government permission to remove his 
remains to Sweden, which request being granted, a 
war vessel was dispatched for the purpose, and the 
body was transferred with appropriate honors. 

A number of different movements in Sweden have 
been instituted with relation to Swedenborg and his 
works. One of these is to be the establishment of 
a museum which shall preserve original portraits 
of him, his relics and his works. The librarian of 
the Stockholm Academy, the institution that pos- 
sesses his manuscripts, has planned a Swedenborg 
room to contain these and other Swedenborgiana. 
Besides this there is the resumption of the publica- 
tion by a photo-lithographic process of fac-similes 
of the manuscripts. The movement by private sub- 
scription resulted in the publication of ten volumes 
about thirty years ago. Three splendid volumes in 
the new series have just issued from the press. 

Swedenborg's investigations in the realm of na- 
ture were of the most profound character. He early 
propounded the theory that all forces in nature, in- 
cluding our vital force, consist mostly of minute 
vibrations or tremulations. He carries this prin- 
ciple all through his scientific and philosophical 
treatises. Electricity, magnetism, light, heat and 
even gravitation, according to his principles, are 
vibrations of the ether in its degrees. In the human 
body the motions of the brain and the lungs produce 
series of motions which are of vital importance in 
the economy of the system. Another principle 
which is of universal application in his philosophy 
is his doctrine of degrees. He shows that as we 
ascend from gross matter to^the finer and subtler 
forms of nature we come to more perfect forms and 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



the earth. This 
in the sphere of naturi 1 . 1 in 

the human body and its liner tissues and fluids. 

ii tlu- body it- 
hut the ruling power n thi the mind 
and soul within, and tl power or organism 
was the ultimate j swedenborg endcav- 
■ each, and • of his 
investigations in physiology and psychology are in 
ird to the influence of the mind on the body and 
the display •.<{ its forces in nature. 

Although many ol Swedenborg's treatises have 
remained unpublished during a period of 175 years, 
of the most important of them were published 
by Swedenborg himself in Latin and have hern 
translated into English. A new edition is now be- 
ing prepared and published by the Swedenborg Sci- 
entific Association of America. A tardy recognition 
of the scope and importance of one of these works. 
"The I'rincipia." has recently been made. It was 
believed that the nebular hypothesis ol" the origin 
of the solar system originated with Laplace. A few 
years ago the astronomers Nyren and Holden 
showed that Swedenborg was entitled to the honor 
of having originated this theory. Dr. Retzius in 
speaking of this work says: "In the first volume of 
his '< tpera Philosophica et Mineralia' he explained 
among other things, his new hypothesis of cosmo- 
gony, a nebular hypothesis, in which — long before 
Kant and Laplace — he represented in word and 
illustration the formation of the planets in the sokr 
system. Laplace himself informs us that he had re- 
ceived his first ideas on this subject from BufTon, 
and Buff on, as is known, had Swedenborg's work- 
in his library." 

In his studies in the field of the human body, in 
his works on the brain, on the anatomy and func- 
tions of the nerves, the circulation of the blood, the 
functions of the various organs, the motions of the 
brain and the lungs, he advanced the knowledge of 
physiology a century beyond his contemporaries. 
In fact, instead of being out of date, we see some of 
the ablest scientists are now co-operating to bring 
his works before the world. They are doing this 
not merely as an honor to the man, nor for their 
historic value, but because they throw a brilliant 
light on the problems of the present age. Ralph 
Waldo Emerson, speaking of Swedenborg as a sci- 
entist and philosopher, says: 

"I lur books are false by being fragmentary, but 
Swedenborg is systematic, and respective of the 
world in every sentence: all the means are orderly 
given ; his faculties work with astronomic punc- 
tuality; and his admirable writing is pure front all 
pertness and egotsm. His writings would be a suffi- 
cient library to the lonely and athletic student; and 
the 'Economy of the Animal Kingdom' is one of 
those books, which by the sustained dignity of 
thinking, is an honor to the human race. 'The Ani- 
mal Kingdom' is a book of wonderful merits. It is 
written with the highest end — to put science and 
the soul, long estranged from each other, at one 
again. . . . One of the missouriums anil masto- 
dons of literature, he is not to he measured by whole 
colleges of ordinary scholars. His stalwart presence 
would flutter the gowns of ;i university." 

The Academy of Sciences of Stockholm is per- 
forming a valuable work in bringing forth 
from their dusty archives the treasures long 
hidden there in the manuscripts of Sweden- 



irb of a pliil- 

igic vestments, 

will he world his marvelous 

qualifications ml will place hint in the 

ranks of Plati le, Copernicus, liable). 

Bacon and Newton. If the movement in Sweden 
to honor the greatest scholar it ever produced re- 
sults in bringing his name before the world of 
scholars, and focuses the .'mention on hi- scientific 
theories ami discoveries, it will perform a use not 
merely in the perpetuation of Swendenborg's mem- 
ory, but will serve to promote a distinct step in the 
advancement of learning. 

+ + + 

Frivolous Definitions 

liv Harry Thompson 

Banquet — A fifty-cent dinner that you pay five 
dollars for. 

Bargain — The spendthrift's excuse 

Benedict — A penitent bachelor. 

Bit igraphy — Posterity's revenge. 

Bore — A loquacious father of precocious children. 

Job — What you are glad to get when you are 
looking fi ir a situation. 

Jealousy — A. tribute to man's vanity that a wise 
a i man pays. 

Naivete — The surprise a girl shows when she re- 
ceives a proposal she has been working for. 

Cozy Comer — Any corner that does not contain 
a chaperon. 

Wedding Present — Society's trading-stamps. 

Inconsistency — Putting a woman on a pedestal to 
look down upon her. 

Suspicion— Testing the engagement ring on win- 
dow-glass. 

Joshing — Promising to he a sister. 
*g> •!• 4* 

A Booh Revolution 

Publishers and booksellers are beginning to be- 
moan the approach of what bids fair to be a decided 
slump in the book market. Notwithstanding the 
generally admitted fact that America has produced 
within the past few years a remarkable crop of 
popular novelists, the total sales of the "best sellers" 
is showing a steady decline. Short stories, how- 
ever, are finding a more ready market than ever be- 
fore. Because of this situation, many buyers of 
fiction are ready to predict a finish fight between 
the volumes of collected short stories and the regu- 
lation novel ; but it is probable that instead of los- 
ing in popularity, the novel is simply suffering 
from conditions wholly separated from any rela- 
tive comparison of merit and demerit. 
A well-posted eastern bookseller says : 
"As a dealer. I have a fairly good idea of how 
things are selling — even better than the average 
publisher, who, as a rule, only runs one or two 
leading lines' of books; whereas, with me I have to 
supply everything from Socialism to Hints for 
Gardners. Now, I know of a number of publishers 
who have bought honks, and actually put them in 
type, but they are afraid to bring them out in the 
ordinary form. It looks very much to me as if the 
demand for the $1.50 book had seen its day. Sev- 
eral of these publishers are debating the bringing 
out of all their books in much ch'eaper editions, and, 
perhaps, the next year or two will see a revolution 
in the hook trade. There is a marked tendency for 
cheap books, ranging from 12 cents to about 60 
cents, and when you ask more than the latter figure 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



for almost any book the 'man on the street' hesi- 
tates before putting his hand into his pocket. 

"I think the publication of magazine literature 
has cheapened the price of books. I do not regard 
the situation as a bad one for the trade exactly ; 
only the publishers will have to adapt themselves 
to the demand for cheap books. In the near future, 
you will see an immense number of the best books 
by modern authors on the market at cheap prices. 
There will be larger sales and heavier editions at 
the low rate. This does not follow that there will 
be less money for authors or lower profits for pub- 
lishers ; it simply means that with the great increase 
of cheap books, the circulation will be far greater 
and there will be even a better chance for an author 
to reach a larger public than there is at present. 
If the book trade refuses to bring down its prices — 
or, almost, it might be said, to cut them in half — 
and the public does not rise to the old figures, then, 
of course, there will be heavy losses all around and 
much suffering both to authors and booksellers will 
follow. From reading the signs of the times, how- 
ever, I think publishers are going to take the hint. 

"Another somewhat curious circumstance is the 
demand for more serious literature than formerly. 
There are a good many publishers who are dropping 
their novel list, or, if they buy novels, are demand- 
ing that they shall deal with more serious life prob- 
lems than are treated by the usual runi of novels. 
While this will, perhaps, necessitate the dropping 
of conventional 'novelly' themes, it will, in my opin.- 
ion, elevate the tone of public reading. Quite a 
number of large publishing houses are making plans 
for the publication of serious works on these lines, 
and I am not personally sorry to see it." 

Rudyard Kipling accounted for the depression in 
the book trade by the fact that there are so many 
reprints of famous novels being placed on the mar- 
ket. Kipling says the present-day author has to 
meet with all the competition of the past, and he 
thus puts the case: "Imagine the feelings of a bar- 
rister exposed to the competition of all the dead 
lord chancellors, each delivering judgment on any 
conceivable case at 12 cents per judgment, paper 
bound." 

* + * 
Master of Isle of Man 

Hall Caine is by all odds the most important per- 
sonage on (the Isle of Man, not excepting Lord 
Raglan, the Lieutenant Governor, or the Speaker of 
the Island Parliament, the House of Keys, accord- 
ing to a cable dispatch from London to the New 
York Times. Picture postcards of the novelist, his 
family, belongings and residence and Greeba Castle 
meet the eye of the visitor to Douglas or Ramsey 
in every shop window, and are sold by hundreds 
of thousands annually to trippers, who, during the 
summer, visit the island from Lancashire manu- 
facturing itowns, and who go out in droves in the 
hope of catching a glimpse of the famous author. 

Mr. Caine is as valuable an asset to this Island 
as its salubrious breezes, and the local appreciation 
of him is correspondingly keen. His views are lis- 
tened to with greater attention than the united 
voice of the whole House of Keys, and, in a figura- 
tive sense, it is often said of him that he owns the 
Isle of Man. What is not generally known is thait 
this, to a great extent, is true in a literal sense. 

During the financial crisis through which the 




We 

Pay 

Special 

Attention 

To 

Our 



OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



B eautiful Dining Furniture in "Stratford" Oak 

It would be hard to find more artistic productions 
than the pieces shown in our stock, designed 'by one 
of the foremost English cabinetmakers, and finished 
in the rich "Stratford" color. Tihe styles are en- 
tirely out of the common, and will appeal to those 
who appreciate the "exclusive". .Make a point to 
see this "Stratford" dining room furniture. 

Ips j\n§eles furniture (jo. 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH end SEVENTH STREETS 

TurniturB.Carpeta.Ruija.Draperips and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productionaof Highest Character 



Tke Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 



W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Tel. E 1467 
Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

2206 S. MAIN ST., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



M. NATHANSON 

LADIES' TAILOR 
HABIT MAKER 

...Highest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 
216 Mercantile Place 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



and miring which 
ractically . Mr. 

mt man in Manx- 
land. II . business sense, and. 
during tl Rnan ial is able to 
lay out the (unds over whicl he had contr 
siderable advantage. 

A friend of his, who visited him recently at 

i eral long drives with him. 

in the course of which the question was often asked 

wdio owned the land over which they were passing. 
In every case Mr. (.'aim's response was either that 
he owned the land outright Or held a mortgage upon 
it. Like Alexander Selkirk, he might have ex- 
claimed, "I am monarch of all I survey". 

But apparently this do itisfy the hum : 

ambition. 

Recently he has been seeking to obtain posses- 
sion of an island which has no Governor, no House 
of Keys, no constitutional authority, and over which 
the actual owner could really rule as a King. This 
island is known as the Calf of Man. and lies a lit/tic 
to the south of the Isle of Man. from which it is 
separated by a channel half a mile wide. It is about 
10,000 acres in extent, of which fourteen acres are 
arahle, and the rest moorland given over to sea- 
birds and rabbits. On the isle is a farmhouse. 

When the Calf of Man was put up at auction on 
Wednesday an opening hid of $10,000 was made 
in behalf of Hall Caine. There was, however, an- 
other competitor, and when the price had been car- 
ried to $15,000 Mr. Caine. who. as already remarked, 
has a keen business sense, desisted. Whereupon 
the present owner withdrew the property. 
+ + * 
Knew Him at Once 

There are other ways of bringing a man to mind 
besides mentioning his name., Among the candi- 
dates who were sent from Princeton to a Philadel- 
phia church -was one young man whose language 
was of the sort which dazzles and delights the 
younger members of a congregation, and some- 
times pleases the elders as well. 

In this case the committee were besieged to ask 
for the young man again, and they consented; but, 
unfortunately, the man to whose lot it fell to write 
the letter had forgotten the candidate's name. Noth- 
ing daunted, he wrote to one of the seminary pro- 
fessors: 

"Please send us that floweret, streamlet, rivulet, 
cloudlet, starlight and moonbeam young- man again. 
We've forgotten his name, hut we've no doubt 
you'll recognize him." 

"We do," wrote the professor, and the desired 
candidate was sent, and subsequently was called to 
the parish. — Youth's Companion. 

+ + + 
Why Waste Time? 

A traveller, finding that he had a couple of hours 
in Dublin, called a cab and told the driver to drive 
him around for two hours. At first all went well, 
but soon the driver began to whip up his horse so 
that they narrowly escaped several collisions. 

"What's the matter?" demanded the passenger. 
"Why are you driving so recklessly? I'm in no 
hurry." 

"Ah, g'wan wid yez," retorted the cabby. "D'ye 
think I'm goin' to put in the whole day drivin' you 
around for two hours! Gitap !" 



,^^03^ 


SHIRTS 

OUR 


jflrSHIRT^ 


L SPECIALTY 


H AND 1 


■ Many new novelties in Patterns 
fl and Colorings. Also a com- 
' pletc line of nobby Neckwear, 

Hosiery and Handkerchiefs to 

match. 


223W. Fifth St. 


Troy Laundry Company 



Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




IMPERIAL 


VA LL E Y 




Vou will buy lots in 


the town of 






HEBER 




next Fall. 


Why not now? 


50 x 130 ft. lots, $100. 




Loftus &. 


Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St 


., Grosse Bldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE S DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



ANDIRONS— GRATES— FIRE SETS 

In Jirtlstic Designs 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. 7I6 - 7I s 8 pEj°n U g T Wt 



WunyautAinA 



For 

broccr 




Company 
LosAnipeles 



14 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




At the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jefferson Paul Chandler, Wednesday evening, Miss 
Lucille Chandler was united in marriage with Ray- 
mond W. Stephens, the service being read by Bish- 
op Conaty. M'iss Mary Chandler, a sister of the 
bride, was ma"id of honor. The bride was also at- 
tended by Mrs. A. P. Patton, another sister. Miss 
Susan Carpenter, Miss Helen Newlin, Miss Helen 
Wells, Miss Mary Lee and Miss Edith Maurice. 
Beatrice and Katherine Ward, daughters of Mr. and 
Mrs. Shirley Ward and nieces of the bride, served 
as flower girls, and William Ward, aged three, car- 
ried the ring. Moye Stephens, brother of the groom, 
acted as best man. Upon their return from their 
wedding trip the young couple will take up their 
residence at No/515 Andrews boulevard. 

Miss Eva Elizabeth Keating, daughter of Major 
and Mrs. H. M. Russell, has returned from a 
month's visit to the East. While absent she was 
the guest, for a few days, of Mrs. Harry Logan of 
Toronto, Canada, formerly Miss Laura Solano of 
this city. 

Miss Florence Margaret Finn, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Albert E. Finn of East Thirty-fourth 
street, and Thomas John Anderson were married 
Tuesday evening in Central hall by the Rev. W. A. 
Brown of Vernon Methodist church. 

The marriage of Miss Anabeth Lasley, daughter 
of Mrs. J. W. Lasley of Figueroa street, and Charles 
B. McConnick of St. Louis was solemnized Tues- 
day at the home of the bride's mother by Rev. Mau- 
rice E. Walton. 

Miss Clara Roush and Sam Wood were quietly 
married Tuesday by the Rev. Baker P. Lee at Christ 
church rectory. They have started upon a wedding 
trip that will consume several months. 

Mrs. Lehman F. Garnsey, accompanied by her 
daughter, Miss Warren Mills, returned Sunday 
evening from a visit of several months to Honolulu, 
Japan, China and the Philippines. 

M'iss Grace Wilshire of this city and Miss Eliza- 
beth Wood of Hollywood served as bridesmaids at 
the wedding of Miss Grace E. Moody and Prof. C. 
M. Haring at Berkeley last week. 

Mrs. F. H. Rindge, Miss Rhoda Rindge, Miss De- 
land, Miss Agnes Hole, Samuel Rindge and Fred- 
erick Rindge have returned from a two months' trip 
to Alaska 

Announcement is made of the engagement of 
Miss Helen Bremer of San Francisco and Adolph 
Fleishman, a well-known young business man of 
this city. 

Complimentary to Miss Lena Turner, a bride- 
elect, Mrs. MacDonald of South Pasadena, enter- 
tained Wednesday afternoon. 

Miss Elizabeth Whitson Burns, daughter of Air. 
and Mrs. Rufus Virgil Burns of Mountain View, 
Cal., and Wilbur Lee Camp, a banker of that place, 



were married Tuesday at the home of the bride's 
aunts, Mrs. A. D. Hunter and Mrs. W. S. Overton. 
The bride and groom are enjoying a trip through 
the Southern and middle Western States. 

September 16 has been set as the date for the 
marriage of Miss Pearl May Palmer, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Taylor, to Oscar Sunbury. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Requa and Dr. and Mrs. 
Henry W. Howard have returned from an extended 
motoring trip through Southern California 

Mr. and Mrs. George Edwin Harber celebrated 
the second anniversary of their marriage Monday 
evening by giving a box party at the Orpheum. 

Miss Olive E. Widener, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. J. Roller of Ontario, was married Saturday to 
Sydney G Rounsefell of this city. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Fish and son, after 
spending a few days at Deer Park, on the Truckee 
River, are at Tahoe Tavern. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sharp entertained Wednes- 
day evening in honor of their daughter, Mrs. Arthur 
L. Flint of Washington, D. C. 

The wedding of Miss Nellie Sheldon of this city 
and Graham Woodbridge Lawrence of Marshall- 
town, Iowa, was solemnized Thursday evening in 



<***&?***», 



So.Broadway iif ^^^^^^ ,=£ So.Hiix Street 
A. FUSENOT CO. 

$30,000 Worth of Newly Imported 



Oriental Rugs 



% to j* off 



REGULAR 
PRICES 



Our great sale is now going on. We have just im- 
ported a finer assortment than ever, and will offer 
them during this sale at prices that will seem al- 
most incredible to well posted buyers. 

DON'T BUY RUGS 

in a hurry, but study them as you would a picture, 
and note the unique color harmony and artistic 
designs. 

LET US HELP YOU 

Select one, and Save You 1-3 to z /~ during this sale. 






Pacific Outlook 



16 



the Church of tin Numerous cntertain- 

meir en during the 

Mr. and Mrs. VV. J. Rot -e and daughters, 

larie and Lorita Ri ise, have returned from 
the mount 

The marriage of Miss I na Turner of this city 
and Dr. Paul Allyn of \\ .n. rly, Ills., will take place 

. cck. 

Mr. and Ml A Cortelyou, who w 

married in Pasadena last week, are at Lake T. 

Mrs. E. VV. Kidder entertained at luncheon Wed- 
iv in honor of Mrs. Join Drake of Long Beach. 

E Walter Pyne and mother, Mr.-. L. A. Pyne, 
have returned from Hear Valley. 

Mrs. J, A. Eichorn of San Francisco is the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Birkel. 

'Mr. and Mrs. Orra E. Monnette have returned 
from an extended eastern trip. 

Major and Mrs. Ben C. Truman and Miss Tru- 
man arc at Lake Tahoe. 

Miss Kate Orr of Roodhouse, Ills., is the guest 
of friends in Hollywood. 

Mrs. Andrew F. West has returned from a five 
months' visit in Japan. 

Miss Olive Trask has entered the State Univer- 
sity at Berkeley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kramer are at Lake Tahoe. 
♦ + ♦ 
Found in tHe "Ads" 

Curiously worded advertisements, funny with- 
out intent, are common in English papers. <A Lon- 
don daily offered a prize for the best collection of 
such announcements, and the following offering 
won : 

"Annual sale now on. Don't go elsewhere to be 
cheated — come in here." 

"A lady wants to sell her piano, as she is going 
abroad in a strong iron frame." 

"For sale — A pianoforte, the property of a musi- 
cian with carved legs." 

"Wanted — A room by two gentlemen about thirty 
feet long and twenty feet broad." 

"Wanted — By a respectable girl, her passage to 
New York; willing to take care of two children 
and a good sailor." 

"Mr. Brown, furrier, begs to announce that he 
will make up gowns, capes, etc., for ladies out of 
their own skins." 

"Bulldogs for sale; will eat anything; very fond 
cf children." 

"Wanted — A boy to be partly outside and partly 
behind the counter." 

"Wanted — For summer, a cottage for a small 
family with good drainage." 

"Lost — Near Highgate Archway, an umbrella be- 
longing to a gentleman with a bent rib and a bone 
handle." 

"Widow in comfortable circumstances wishes to 
marry two sons." 

"To be disposed of. a mail phaeton, the property 
of a gentleman with a moveable headpiece as good 
as new." 

"Going out whitewashing, taken in here." 



ThanKs 



i -. I Si Irani used to 
tell had a- brother, Grant's friend 

and room-mate at W'esl Point. While she was still 
Julia Dent he came hom< on furlough with a real 
boyish longing fare and home delicacies. 

He petitioned particularly for com dodgers, bul 
cook was cross i out of ii der, si i thai 

only two of the desired cakes came to table Voting 
I Km eyed them i igly and then surprised 

his mother by asking permission to say grace. When 

this was accorded, the harum-scarum lad folded his 
hands, and. bowing his head, reverently said: 

Two corn dodgers for four of us. 

Thank the Lord there are no more of us. 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. 



Shaving Outfit*. Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews. 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 



We grind all kinds of Cutlery and 
do it well. 



210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 




^_^ Japanese and Oriental 




ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANH EMB'ROI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kat\iuchi Bros, imports 

533 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 

Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orler on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 
too Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-00 
250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 



16 



Pacific Outlook 




A Contented Woman 

Some people may regard this play as merely a 
funny spectacle. It is immensely amusing but like 
all true humor it contains a kernel of deep and last- 
ing philosophy. It is founded on the experience of 
the ages. It demonstrates the fruitlessness of fem- 
inine unrest. The gist of the argument is that all 
women are much happier if they do cheerfully just 
what their husbands tell them to, as naturally a man 
knows best how to twist the tail of fate to his liking 
and to his profit and therefore incidentally to the 
good of his wife. A contented woman needs no 
mind. It is her glimpses of intelligence which 
makes a woman unhappy. 

Grace Holme lives in Denver and becomes an op- 
ponent of her husband in his struggle for the office 
of mayor of the city. She is elected eventually, 
much to her dismay, and regains her peace of mind 
only when she finds that her husband is really to 
be mayor instead of herslf. Blanche Hall takes this 
role in the play as presented by the Burbank Stock 
Company, and both as wife and as a toy soldier she 
affords plenty of amusement to the audience. The 
play is cleverly put together and is never dull for a 
moment. Louise Royce has rarely had a better 
chance to show her skill than in the part of Aunt 
Jim, the suffragette. The stage was always livelier 
for her presence and the only regret one felt was 
that, at the end, a woman of so much spirit was, 
obliged to go to bed early even before dawn, at ihe 
command of her silly old husband, a part well taken 
by John W. Burton. One of the most delightful 
features of the evening was the evident sympathy of 
the audience for the men in the play. It seems to 
be a recognized fact that men are ruled by the 
tomahawk charms of their women folk and that any 
chance to get even is a rare bliss. 

Elsie Esmond as Mrs. Ebbsmith was unusually 
good in the slight scenes in which she appeared, 
and Maude George and Fanny Yantis were delight- 
fully droll as political women. Fay Bainter sang 
and danced in a most pleasing fashion much appre- 
ciated by the audience. 

The piece has the advantage of being distinctly 
gay without having any unpleasant episodes and 
one leaves the theater with a light heart, having had 
the unmerited satisfaction of having gone through 
a couple of hours without a yawn. It is a pity that 
the world is not as funny as the Burbank Company 
makes us believe it is during the spell of their 
make-believe hours. The play emphasizes a joyous 
disregard for moral purposes and the usual fatuity 
of ethical standards in the hands of natural men. 



Ancient Play Revived 

The times demand it, probably, otherwise it is 
hardly likely that the playsmith would have deemed 
it advisable, in order to satisfy the theater-going 
public, to mutilate almost beyond recognition the 
original text of Oliver Goldsmith's delightful com- 



edy, "She Stoops to Conquer". According to mod- 
ern standards they have improved the play; at any 
rate, they have eliminated portions which might 
prove offensive to those of this day who find much 
to raise the blush in the dialogue of a century or two 
since in England. However, the revision of the 
Goldsmith text has not obliterated the point of the 
story he has told, and perhaps it is as well that the 
playwrights and the players of this Twentieth Cen- 
tury should defer to a greater or less extent to the 
spirit of the age — especially when they find it more 
profitable to do so. 

Most of the Belasco Company, which revived this 
delightful play this week, caught its spirit, though 
some of the cast failed to rise to the characters as- 
signed to them. Hobart Bosworth as Young Mar- 
low and Richard Vivian as Tony Lumpkin seem to 
have been more thoroughly imbued with the spirit 
actuating the characters they portrayed than the 
other members of the cast, though Howard Scott as 
Diggory lacked but little of realizing what was ex- 
pected of that part. Miss Grey's work demon- 
strated her unfitness for such a part as Miss Hard- 
castle. Strong in such roles as the Rose of the 
Rancho. she appears to be poorly fitted to light, 
coquettish parts. William Yerance as Hardcastle 
and Eleanor Carey as Mrs. Hardcastle were both 
pleasing and effective. 

Notwithstanding the minor deficiencies, the play 
was well-produced, as a whole, and the Belasco 
management is to be commended for offering it. 
The greater the variety of attractions the more cer- 
tain of pleasing all classes of patrons will this 
house be. DON. 



Strong Play for the Belasco 

Now that "In the Bishop's Carriage" ha? been re- 
leased to stock companies, it promises to become 
more popular than ever. The Belasco company will 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

XLbc Starr piano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 






Pacific Outlook 



17 



uce it next week. Il nig wom- 

an thief u by the police, hides in 

the carriage of the bishop nd is mistaken by that 
wl m he lias expected to 
him, l»ut wlv>m he lia> never scon. The c 
plications during tl it the girl masquerades 

arc numerous and exciting, for she keeps up her 
m with her old "pals". At last she is forced 
ive the bishop's housi and with a confederate 
attempts the robbery of an apartment occupied by 
tective who discover- hi r in the act. However, 
he fills in love with her. leads her to reform and 
finally marries her. 

Mis- Grey, who i- ;,, play the lead, has played it 
in the east and is thoroughly familiar with it. Ben 
Graham, the new character man. will he seen for 
the first time, and the full Strength of the Bete 
company will he utilized in the production. The 
scenery and other effects will he Up to the standard 
of the usual Belasco production and the play should 
draw large audiences. 

Following; the "Bishop'- Carriage" a splendid 
double hill will be presented, including John Luther 
Long's famous "Madam Butterfly" and Sheridan's 
delightful comedy. "The Critic", which, when played 
at private performance for the Friday Morning Club 
by the Belasco company, caused such favorable 
comment. It is by special request that this double 
bill has been arranged. 

At the Gamut Club 

Miss Frieda E. Peycke, pianist, of the Chicago 
Conservatory of Music, assisted by Miss Mabelle 
Clark, prima donna soprano, of Los Angeles, ren- 
dered the following programme for the entertain- 
ment of the Gamut Club members and their friends 
"Ladies' night", Friday August 28, at the Gamut 
Club Auditorium : 

Sonata Op. 7 Grieg 

My Ladies' Eves 

I Wonder Why 

A Streaming Sunbeam Frieda C. Peycke 

Miss Clark 

Chimes Liapanomo 

Etude de Concert MacDowell 

A Finland Love Song 

If I Could Have One Wish 

Rivals 

Sing to Me With Your Eyes Frieda C. Peycke 

Miss Clark 

Nocturno Grieg 

Lorelei Seeling 

Sextet from Lucia di Lammermoor 

Leschetizsky. arranged for left hand 

The rendering of the above will be reviewed in 
our next issue. 

* * * 

Good In Spots 

"Servility will disappear," said Frederick Van 
Eeden, the Dutch poet and economist, "with the 
disappearance of our present unjust social system." 

He paused and smiled. 

"Servility — what a despicable thing it is. A 
young Dutch bookkeeper lunched one day in 
Amsterdam with his employer, a millionaire tulip 
dealer. Suddenly the millionaire sniffed. 

"But, my dear Hans,' he said to the bookkeeper, 
T am afraid your egg is bad.' 

" 'Oh, sir," murmured the servile clerk, flushing 
deeply, 'really — er — some parts of it are very good, 
indeed.' " 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

Wc can put you up a home in almost any part of 
the city — from Royh- Heights to the Wcstlake Dis- 
trict. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Hatvcy McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson, Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 
E 
S 
I 

D 
E 
N 
T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES &FARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



PROPERTIES 



B 
U 

s 

N 

E 
S 
S 



XDlnberbill Sbirt Co. 



MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SHirts 



Phone F 6715 



4-14-K South Broad-way 




Leading Clothiers (INC* 

437- 439 - 441 - 443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets.. 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 

KOBIII1 MAiXSON. Sole Agtnt for Los Angeles County 

Phone F 1552 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We 


Handle [Bargains 


Only. 


Rentals, Loans, 


Investments, 










Insurance 








GUY 


E. AGENBROAD 

REAL ESTATE 






Phone F 1468 






902 Security Btdg., L 


os Angeles 


Col 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



LITERARY NOTES 



By PBREZ Fiei.d 
G. K. Chesterton has written an amusing tale in 
his recent novel called "The Man Who Was Thurs- 
day." It opens with a discussion between two 
poets. 

"An artist is identical with an anarchist," cried 
Gregory (one of the artists). "You might trans- 
pose the words anywhere. An anarchist is an artist. 
The man who throws a bomb is an artist, because 
he prefers a great movement to everything. He 
sees how much more valuable is one burst of blaz- 
ing light, one peal of perfect thunder, than the mere 
common bodies of a few shapeless policemen. An 
artist disregards all governmenlts, abolishes all con- 
ventions. The poet delights in disorder only. If it 
were not so, the most poetical thing in the world 
would be the Underground Railway." 

"So it is," said Mr. Syme (the ather artist). 

"Nonsense," said Gregory, who was very rational 
when any one else attempted paradox. "Why do 
all the clerks and navvies in the railway trains look 
so sad and tired, so very sad and tired? I will tell 
you. It is because they know that the train is go- 
ing right. ... It is because after they have passed 
Sloane Square they know that the next station must 
be Victoria, and nothing but Victoria. Oh, their 
wild rapture ! Oh, their eyes like stars and their 
souls again in Eden, if the next station were unac- 
countably Baker Street!" 

The poet Syme replied: "Chaos is dull; because 
in chaos the train might indeed go anywhere, .to 
Baker Street or to Bagdad. But man is a magician, 
and his whole magic is in this, that he does say Vic- 
toria, and lo, it is Victoria. No, take your books of 
mere poetry and prose; leit me read a time table, 
with tears of pride. . . . Give me Bradshaw, I 
say." 

"Yes, the poet will be discontented even in the 
streets of heaven. The poet is always in revolt." 

"There again," said Syme irritably, "what is there 
poeltical about being in revolt? You might. as well 
say that it is poetical to be seasick. Being sick is 
a revolt. Both being sick and being rebellious may 
be the wholesome thing on certain desperate occa- 
sions ; but I'm hanged if I can see why they are 
poetical. Revolt in /the abstract is revolting. It is 
mere vomiting." 



A new story by Jack London, called "Martin 
Eden", will be published serially in the Pacific 
Monthly, the first instalment to appear in the Sep- 
tember number. The author claims that it is en- 
tirely different from anything else which he has 
done heretofore. 



New Books at the Public Library 
*Puvis de Chauvaunes belongs to Newnes's Art 
Library and contains a large number of full-page 
reproductions of the frescos of this famous artist. 

*The Egyptian Sudan, by E. A. Wallis Budge 
(Two vols. Lippincott, 1907). Dr. Budge has made 
several visits to the Sudan in order to carry on ex- 
cavations for the British Museum, and while in the 
country he gathered material for a history of the 
land which is publised in the second of these two 
volumes. The first volume is devoted to an account 
of his travels and of the excavations which he direct- 
ed. There are manv illustrations and the volumes 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



T HE 1908 
MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Ball-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typeibar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play ami without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St,. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL YEAR 

Daily train service. Connects 
with Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe. 



There is no season in Yosemite more delightful 
than the Fall — when clothed in its Autumn hues. 
Roads and trails open to points of interest. Write 
for folder. 

H. H. Vincient, Genl. Agt., O. W. Lehmer, T. Mgr. 
553 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. Merced, Cal. 




DuBois ®> Davidson 

Furniture Company 

213-214 West. Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 

High Grade Furniture 

pzr AT COST 

Lace Curtains 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



Now It's Rawhide, Nevada 

Funny, isn't it"' Hero all of ns had just settled down satisfied that the wonderful camps at Tonopah, G 
field. Bullfrog, and ' in Nevada's name for richness and quantit] produced when 

aloiu rboy timer named Charley Holman. and produces K try — is it — 

that Rawhide, in pr duplicating the other rich camps ol and 

Td mining camp of the world, and 'ill it is in tl 

of d< it. The 

Los Ex- 



' >'>>■" 




**r< 



■ "iri'ri-* 






ently an- 
nounci 'I 

Rawhide Ship- 
ments Increase 

Mot e ore i b< ing 
shipped out of Raw- 
hide at the present 
time than at any 
period in the his- 
tory of that camp. 
Wednesday two 

tons were shipped 
from the Jordan 
lease of the Queen 
Mascot. Thirty tons 
are en route from 
the Grutt Hill mint. 
The Westenr Ore 
Purchasing company 
of Hazen is sam- 
pling 300 sacks of 
high grade just re- 
ceived from the 
Czar lease on the 
Regent Mining com- 
pany's property, and 
there are 200 sacks 

more on the dump at the Czar ready for sacking and shipment. The McKinley lease on the same property 
has just shipped ujj sacks. 

The accompanying illustration shows a hoist being installed on the Rawhide King Hill Mining Com- 
pany's Coalition lease. The hoist is the Western type and was shipped from Los Angeles. With the hoist 
in operation the work of opening the mine and getting it in shape for production will be greatly facilitated. 
The shaft which is a little over 130 feet deep is to be continued to the 300 foot level where a station will 
be cut and a cross cut driven to open the rich vein of ore proved up at a depth of 65 feet. With the present 
plan of development consummated the King Hill will become one of the steady producers of high grade 
milling ore in Rawhide. 

The accompanying illustration serves to show what the King Hill hasn't done more than what it has 
done. Plenty of ore is at hand. What we want is money to help get it out. If we had th.e money ourselves 
we wouldn't ask for any. All our money is in this mine and lease, and we are glad of it. 

The public now-a-days is demanding results. The era of the promoter with the red vest and diamond 
solitaire and "mining claim" is passing. The Rawhide Kin.g Hill Mining Company is getting results, and 
will continue to get results for every dollar invested with it. 

The property is located on Silver King hill, inside of the city limits of Rawhide, and comprises a part 
of the coalition's purchase, right in the center of the proven district. The company is operating on three 
blocks of 300 feet square each, nearly seven acres. There are rich stringers of ore all the way down the shaft, 
and the entire dump of about 200 tons is all millable ore. 

At 65 feet in the cross-cut a seven foot quartz ledge was opened up that gave values of from $12 to 
$1,000 per ton, which will average about $100 per ton. Picked samples run up in the thousands. 

This company also owns claim Mohawk No. 1, of 20 acres, just back of Balloon hill, and adjoining the 
famous Jordan lease which recently sold for $25,000. No work is being done on this .claim yet but leasers 
will be put to work on it soon. It is believed to be very rich and will become a big producei. 

This company is officered by experienced mining men, who are on the ground giving their personal 
attention to the supervision of the work now being done. L. W. Klinker, President, J. E. Burney, Vice- 
President. E. C. Klinker, Secretary and Manager, C. J. Klinker, Treasurer and Mine Superintendent. 

Capital stock $1,000,000 divided into 1,000,000 shares, par value $1. 400,000 shares Treasury stock to be 
sold for developing and operating purposes as needed. Only 50,000 shares now on sale at 30 cents a share. 
The company reserves right to advance price without notice. iStock will be issued as orders are received. 
In event of oversubscription of this allotment money will be refunded. The recent rich strike on the Grutt Hill 
Mint adjoins us on the north and is on the same claim. For further information call on or address 

J. E. MEYER, Pacific Savings Bank 

202 Mercantile Place Los Angeles, Cal. 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



will be eagerly read by all students who have fallen 
under the fascination of the mysterious land watered 
by the Nile. 

*The Old Venetian Palaces and Old Venetian 
Folk, by Thomas Okey (Dutton, 1907) is an agree- 
able medley of art, politics and anecdote well illus- 
trated, both in color and in black and white. It is 
a book read better in spots than consecutively, giv- 
ing vistas for the fancy to wander in. 

*Hawthorne and His Wife, by Julian Hawthorne 
(Houghton, 1884), is one of the standard bio- 
graphies of this famous romancer. It contains many 
letters giving an insight into the intimate life 
of the author. 

Three technical books come this week to the 
shelves — Cyaniding Gold and Silver Ores, by Julian 
and Smart (Griffin, London, 1907) ; a Handbook of 
Wireless Telegraphy, by J. Erskine-Murry (Van 
Nostrand, 1907), which is not too scientific to be of 
interest to lay readers who like exact information, 
and Designs for Small Dynamos and Motors, by 
Cecil P. Poole (McGraw, 1906). 

Petrarch, His Life and Times, by H. C. Hollway- 
Calthrop (Putnams, 1907), is an easily written ac- 
count of the life and vicissitudes of this poet with- 
out plaguing the reader with the difficulties of the 
subject. Travelers who have stood on the walls of 
Avignon and looked over the hills toward Vaucluse 
will find an interesting chapter describing the life 
of the poet in that secluded valley. 

The Musical Guide in two volumes, by Hughes 
(McClure, 1908), is a dictionary of musical terms 
and a concise biographical encyclopedia of musi- 
cians likely to be of great service to music lovers. 

*Two Bird-Lovers in Mexico, by C. William 
Beebe (Houghton, 1905). As the author is a cura- 
tor of the New York Zoological Park one may, it is 
hoped, believe with an easy conscience the wonder- 
ful tales he tells and escape the humiliation of swal- 
lowing nature-faking deceits. We are told, among 
other things, that an iguana can grow a sort of imi- 
tation tail whenever it loses the original one. This 
must be a pleasing "iguanayan" convenience. 

Literary Rambles in France, by Miss Betham- 
Edwards (McClurg, 1907), tells of some of the less 
frequented literary shrines, such as Croisset, where 
Flaubert wrote "Madame Bovary", and St. Georges 
de Didonne, a place sought by Michelet. "Chantilly 
and Mme. de Sevigne" and "In the Morvau" are the 
titles of other chapters. A chatty guide book with 
a literary excuse. 

Proceedings of the Providence Conference for 
Good City Government, 1907, contains a number of 
papers by various speakers read last November at 
the, thirteenth annual meeting of the National Muni- 
cipal League. Over a score of well-known men are 
quoted, among them being Charles J. Bonaparte, 
Brand Whitlock, Charles Sprague and others. 

Poems, by Alfred Noyes, (Macmillan, 1908), with 
an introduction by Hamilton W. Mabie. 

The Gothic Quest, by Ralph Adams Cram, is a 
series of essays on architecture and church decora- 
tion. 

A volume of *Essays, Letters and Miscellanies, 
by Lyof N. Tolstoi (Scribners, 1899), contains chap- 
ters on many subjects expounding the ideas of the 
Russian prophet. In an essay called "Stupefy 
Themselves?" the author claims that "smoking is 
directly dependent on the need of deadening con- 
science, and it attains its end," and furthermore he 



insists that smoking is not conducive to intellectual 
labor but only serves to deaden the critic within the 
writer who is thus satisfied with inferior work. 

♦Current Issues, by Honi. Leslie Mortimer Shaw 
(Appleton, 1908), is composed of letters and ex- 
cerpts from speeches covering a wide range of sub- 
jects. It is a suggestive book but frankly partisan, 
as might well be expected from an ex-cabinet officer. 
The topics are the tariff, reciprocity, merchant 
marine, trusts and currency. 

*01d Spanish Masters Engraved, by Timothy 
Cole (Century, 1907), contains thirty wood engrav- 
ings by this master of his art, and also an introduc- 
tion by the well-known art critic, Charles H. Caffin. 
The latter says one of the "characteristics of Span- 
ish art is its unwavering naturalism. Every school 
of art has been developed at its start upon nature- 
imitations, but other schools, having gained a mas- 
tery over natural forms, proceeded to idealize them. 
Spanish artists clung, like the Dutch of the Seven- 
teenth Century, to the actual types of nature. In 
the case of the Dutch it was due to their single- 
hearted preoccupation with themselves and their 
own life ; in that of the Spanish to their correspond- 
ing devotion to religion as a natural part of their 
actual lives." 

*Books recommended. 




Exclusive 
Woman's Hatter 
French and EnglisH Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 







~q PURE 






Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 


riofl 




, NATURAl'cO 
It has a better f 
age as a summe 
Our Teas are 
with great care. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. 


state are "uncolored." THE 

LOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 

avor and makes a refreshing bever- 

r drink. 

all pure — uncolored — and selected 

Order direct from us by telephone. 

TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Fifth St. 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds and Investments 
* Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE. SECURITIES 
202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Fads About a Rotary Gas Engine 

And Why 

YOU SHOULD INVEST 

In the Stock of The Los Angeles Rotary Gas Engine Company 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



Advantages of a Rotary Gas Engine for Automobiles 



It IS air-cooled, absolutely. 

It runs more slowly on high gear than any FOUR 

or SIX. 
It picks up speed faster and more easily on the 

throttle. 
It has practically NO vibration. 
It runs with a silence unknown to the FOUR or 
SIX. 

It makes gear shifting- almost unnecessary. 
It has no equal for hill climbing. 



It weighs only one-third as much as the ordinary 

motor. 
It costs only two-thirds as much to build it. 
It does away with reciprocation. 
It has a simple and positive lubrication system. 
It has no fly wheel. 
It has no radiator. 
It has no water pump. 
It has no water piping. 
It has no water jackets on the cylinders. 
It has no cooling fans. 



Why We Recommend that You Become Interested in the Los Angeles 

Rotary Gas Engine Company 

Because this company will manufacture a type of engine for which there is already a world-wide de- 
mand, and owing to the fact that the rotary engine is adapted to so many purposes and the cost of construc- 
tion as compared with the vertical type of engine is so materially reduced, by reason of the elimination of 
many parts, the profits of the company are bound to be large. 

Because this company has passed the experimental stage, having perfected its engine in every particular, 
and is now ready to place its product on the market, thereby insuring to tlhe investor quick returns on his 
investment. 

Because the Los Angeles Rotary Gas Engine Company is a home industry and is managed by local busi- 
ness men of integrity and business ability, which fact insures cautious business methods and honest hand- 
ling of funds. 

Because at the present time there is hardly any ot'her line of industry making as large profits as the 
automobile manufacturers, and although we cannot honestly state 'how large our profits will be it is fair to 
state that many automobile concerns declared dividends this year ranging from twenty-five to two hundred 
per cent; and what others have done with an article of less merit than ours .we at least should equal with 
our superior product. 

The company is capitalized for $1,000,000.00, divided into 100,000 shares of the par value of $10.00 eac'h. 
We propose to sell the first 2,000 shares at $2.50 a share. We request that you give our proposition most 
careful investigation and that you act quickly if you wish a block of this stock at the low price quoted. 

The officers and directors of the compay are: 

WILLIAM E. BROWN, President. H. P. HITCHCOCK, Secretary. 

JOSEPH R. LOFTUS, Vice-president. M. E. BROWN, 

F. E. WOODLEY, Treasurer. F. WINSTANLEY, 

GEORGE H. LEWIS. 

We invite you to call at our office and inspect the engine now on exhibition. 

THE ACKERLY COMPANY 

Financial Agents 
538 South Broadway 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



The Obedient Horse 

Chicago papers told the other day in picture and 
story of a policeman's horse ithat followed his mas- 
ter into a barber shop. A Philadelphia police horse, 
not long ago, caused some excitement by trudging 
along behind his rider right into the City Hall. 
But for, every yarn about intelligent police mounts 
in ather cities, the average New York traffic "cop" 
has one to match. As a Park Row city cavalryman 
remarked, patting the glossy brown neck of his aid 
and companion, "He knows a heap more'n a whole 
lot of the 'muts' that we protect, and if he didn't he 
wouldn't be fit for his job." One day recently a 
patrolman had dismounted at a congested spot to 
straighten out a tangle of vehicles, leaving his horse, 
untied and unguarded, near the curb. The animal 
stayed right 'there, as still as a soldier at attention, 
until the odor of a fine basket of peaches, just out 
of reach across the sidewalk, struck his nostrils. 
The bait was too tempting even for that well itrained 
horse, and inch by inch he edged up toward the 
luscious meal. Just then his rider, busy a hundred 
feet up the street, saw him and yelled, "Hey, you, 
Bob, turn around there'!" And Bob iturned around 
obediently and put temptation behind him. 

* * * 

Are Bare Arms Immoral? 
A Hartford moralist has been protesting against 
the fashion of bare arms, so much affected by wo- 
men during the past few years. What is the harm 
if a woman does bare her arms to the elbow for 
convenience or fashion? asks The Lounger in Put- 
nam's and The Reader for August. As far back as 
my recollection goes, and it is far-reaching, the 
working woman has bared her arms to the elbow — 
and further — without comment. The lady who 
washes your clothes rolls up her sleeves as far as 
they will go, and has done so from time immemor- 
ial ; yet I have never heard the practice condemned 
as immoral. Is iit only when Fashion dictates the 
abbreviated sleeve that it is wrong? Why should 
the bare arm of the woman of fashion "portend evil 
to the morals of the nation," any more than the 
bare arm of the "Madonna of the Tubs"? Not only 
the "wash lady" and the "scrub lady", but the 
haughty "lady" who tosses pie to the farmers' sum- 
mer boarders, bares her arms for the task. 

* * * 

The English Language 
We'll begin with a 'box, and the plural is boxes. 
But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes. 
Then one fowl is a goose, but two are called geese, 
Yet the plural of mouse should never be meese; 
You will find a lone mouse or a whole nest of mice, 
But the plural of house is houses, not hice. 
If the plural of man is always called men, 
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen? 
The cow in the plural may be cows or kine, 
But a bow, if repeated, is never called bine, 
And the plural of vow is vows, never vine. 
If I speak of a foot and you sbow me your feet, 
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet? 
If one is. a tooth and the whole set are teeth, 
Why shouldn't the plural of booth he called beeth? 
If the singular's this and the plural these, 
Should the plural of kiss ever be nicknamed keese? 
Then one would be that and three would be those. 
Yet the plural of hat would never be hose, 
And the plural of cat is cats, not cose. 
We speak of a brother and also of brethren, 
But though we say mother, we never say methren. 
Then the masculine pronouns are he, his and him, 
But imagine the feminine she, shis and shim. 
So the English, I think you all will agree, 
Is the queerest language you ever did see. 

■ — Fuel. 




Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



^ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 



Pacific Outlook 




A AGE ©IF HUMOR 



"D C7 




In Sanitary Boston 
Having in mil 

manifested, and m ly, a clevei 

'teacher ha 

'nre and Ins teacher 
• for admissii n tn thi 
ommy, hai 
"Yes, ma'am." 
"Have you had your vermiform appendix removed?" 

S, ma'am." 
"Have yon a certificate of inoculation for the croup, 
chickenpox, measles, scarlet fever and diphtheria?-" 
"Yes, ma'am." 
"Is your luncheon put up in a patent antiseptic dinner 

el?" 
"Yes. ma'am." 

"Have you your own sanitary slate-bag and disinfected 
drinking cup?" 
"Yes, ma'am." 

"Do you wear a camphor bag round your throat, a 
psible life-helt. and in; eel for en — 

in^ 'he electric line?" 
"Yes, ma'am: all of tin - 

"Then you may hang your hal on the insulated pes. and 
proceed to study your lesson in the 34th volume of 'Hy- 
giene for the Yi iung.' " 

+ + + 
Drank the Microbes 
Once when Pasteur was dining with his daughter and 
her family at her home in Bergundy he took care to dip in 
1-- of water the cherries that were served for dessert 
and then to wipe them carefully with Ins napkin before 
putting them in his mouth. His fastidiousness amused the 
people at the table, but the scientist rebuked them for their 
levity and discoursed at length on the dangers in microbes 
and animalculae. A few moments later, in a fit of ab- 
straction, he suddenly seized the glass in which he had 
washed the cherries and drank the water, microbes and 
all, at a single draught. 

+ <• + 
Why He Passed Around the Hat 
"Yes," said Mr. Tambo, "I passed around the hat to- 
day." "And why." inquired Mr. Bones, "did you pass 
around the hat?" "I had to. It was a merry widow." — 
Washington Herald. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Needed the Raw Materials 
"You ought to try to take life more philosophically," 
said the man who means well. 

"1 haven't the raw materials for philosophy," answered 
Farmer Corntossel. 
"The raw materials?" 

"Yep. Most of the philosophy I have seen needed a 
foundation of fried chicken and trimmings and an easy- 
chair and a box of cigars and a number of other things 
I don't happen to have handy." — Washington Star. 

t * ♦ 

Those Fool Questions 
"Why, my boy! did you fall in that open coal hole?" 
"No; course not. I wuz in here, an' they built a pave- 
ment over me." — Illustrated Bits. 

+ * + 

His Deep Concern 

The kind old lady noticed a small lad entering a cob- 
bler's with a small package. 

"What have you there, sonny?" she asked kindly. 

"Ma's slipper." replied the lad; "you see. there is a tack 
out of place in it and I want to have it fixed before ma 
notices it." 

"Ah, what a considerate little boy! T suppose you are 
afraid the tack might hurt your mother's foot?" 

"Well, it isn't exactly that. You see, the' tack is stick- 
ing out on the sole and this is the slipper ma spanks me 
with." — Chicago News. 



The Men Said Nothing 
At a dinner at the ' I 

ihionable writci . ; wenl 

Then, in the .lark. Mr- Pilyn in her prim English 1 

■• \ debutai e 1 ....... . end 

-he had made to a • IUC in I >ev. 11 

"'At dim said, 'the lights went 

Out, anil wasn't it funny, mamma?' lie women didn't 
to lighl them again.' 
"'How <!•' you kii"\\ thej didn't?' asked the mother. 
"'Because they were all crying out "Won't !" ami "Stop!" 

And the men didn't saj :i v, 1 id .' " 
+ * + 
A Blessing 

"What with whooping cough, measles, and all that," 
began the first traveler, "children are a great eare. but 
they are also great blessings 

"That'- what they are," interrupted the second traveler. 
"I don't know how we should get along without them." 

"Ah! you're a family man. too?" 

"No, a physician." — Philadelphia Press. 

* ♦ * 
There Are Many Left 

Simpkins — You say that little man was formerly the 
lightweight chaiTypibn? Tiirkins — Yes. Simk'ins — How 
did he lose the title? Tikins — Oh. he didn't lose it. He 
merely sold his grocery and retired. — Chicago Daily News. 

♦ + * 
Last Excuse Gone 

"Your office boy looks sad." 
"Yes, he's an orphan." 
"Folks die recently?" 
"Nope, been dead a number of years." 
"Then why the grief?" 

"Baseball today and no one in his family to die." — 
Houston Post. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Tempering His Joy 

He — When did you discover first that you loved me, 
sweetheart? 

She — When I found myself getting angry everytime 
people called you an idiot. — Punch. 

* * •=• 
A Quandary 

"What are you going to do wbefi they ask you for a 
campaign contribution?" 

"It's a problem," answered Mr. Dustin Stax. "If I 
don't give they'll say I'm penurious, and if I do give they'll 
say I'm an easy mark." — Washington Star. 

How Did They Know Him? 

A certain family, the most bopeful member of which 
was a brisk little lad with red hair, recently moved from 
one small city to another. 

"The boys in this town must have heard all about me 
before we moved here," boasted Tommy on the day after 
the family's arrival. 

"But there's no one here that knew us," objected his 
mother. 

"That's all right," persisted Tommy. "Just as soon as I 
came in the schoolyard this morning, they all yelled, 
'Hello, Bricktop!' just the way they used to do at home." 

Not Her Fault 

It was in the drawing room after dinner that they dis- 
cussed an absent maiden friend's bad points with the 
usual grim and scathing glee. Having thoroughly dissect- 
ed her .personal appearance, they next paid attention to 
her mental shortcomings. 

"S'he is a very singular girl," spake the one. 

'Yes, indeed," responded her companion, "but then 
that is not her fault, for I never saw a girl so anxious to 
be plural." — London Opinion. 



TTe 



"AR.TISTANO" 




The "Artistano" is a strictly high-grade Grand Piano 

with an interior player. An instrument for the 

most fastidious. Manufactured by the 

A. B. Chase Company. 



"IN A CLASS OF ITS OWN" 



231-233-235 
So. Broadway 



Demonstrations Daily at Our Store 

The Big Exclusive Piano House 

BARTLETT MUSIC CO. 



Opposite 
City Hall 






Beam; ootumk 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 



Gaarw* Bahar J9ndaraon 

editor 



H. C. Jlckrrly 
PRCSIOCNT 



m ubtiih*d ovory Saturday 
LlMMnmr Build. ng. Lot Jtngalas, California, fry the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription prico S2.00 a yrar In advance. Jlngto copy S 

cants on all nrwa stand*. 

Eoierrd Mwcond-clsu nilter April f, 1937, tl tbr poitoffice 11 Lot An|cle«, 
California, under ibc ict of Congrett ol March 1, 1879. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 
Tin* I'liiiii.- Ootlook 1m nulled to nrinwrlfeeN through the 

Low Anicrlen 1'ont OIBce ever) I'rlilny. ami nlimilri lie de- 
livered In every port of the pity 1> > S111 nrilnj *« poati If tor 
nuy rennon It shoo Id he delayed* «r be delivered In poor 
i-iintlii Inn, MuhMcrlhern will confer n favor upon the piibllMlierN 
by uit Int; them tmmetlintc notice* 

Vol.5 Los Jfngeles, Cat. .September 5. I90S Mo. IO 



6 
8 



A THOUGHT FOR THIS DAY 

The Spirit of Love 

You will find as you look back upon your life that X 

the moments that stand out, the moments when you 3 

have really lived, are the moments when you have 

done things in a spirit of love. — Henry Drummond. n 



PARTICULAR NOTICE 
Johe Pacific OutlooR's Policy 

The Pacific Outlook desires to state unequivocal- 
ly that it is not the organ of any creed, sect, political 
party, organization, corporation or person, but is 
absolutely free and untrammelled in its associa- 
tions. 

It stands unqualifiedly, and without fear, for that 
which it believes to be true, clean, honest and right 
in human affairs — political, secular, commercial and 
industrial; and in its columns will always maintain 
an unprejudiced and impartial attitude in its dis- 
cussion of all subjects of universal or locai interest. 



COMMENT 



Bv George Baker Anderson 
THE MOST conspicuous dereliction of the Re- 
publican State Convention was a sin of omission. 
In spite of the loud protestations on the part of the 
"leaders" in the organization about primary and 
county convention time, when all sorts of promises 
regarding the introduction and passage of a law 
prohibiting race track gambling were made, the 
convention was as silent as the grave— as might 
have been expected. Sena-tor Leavitt, who re- 
ceives a handsome income from the race track 
management at Emeryville, and Tom Williams, 
president of the California Jockey Association, ef- 
fectually gagged the delegates who thought, about 
county 'convention time, that their duty lay in the 
direction of urging the state convention to adopt an 



anti-gambling plank. By virtue of necessitj the 
Los Angeles delegate? pledged themselves to stand 

for this measure, and the legis 
Effectually nominees o( the county convention 
Gagged stand similarly pledged to work and 
for the outlawry of the race track 
gambler. Last week the hypocritical delegates 
sent to the ~i.ii>' convention from 1..^ Angeles coun- 
ty remained silent on this subject, failing to redeem 
their pledges. Nothing better is to be expected, of 
course, from the candidates for legislative honors — 
if election to a California legislature be an honor. 
Just so long as the Southern Pacific political ma- 
chine is permitted to dictate or in any way influence 
nominations, no anti-gambling statute will go upon 
the books. The promise made at the county con- 
ventions which dared place themselves on record 
were not made to be redeemed. Nobody but fools 
believe a Southern Pacific legislature will enact any 
such law. Its friends and supporters, the race track 
gamblers, are altogether too numerous. Thousands 
of voters await, with keen interest, the action of the 
Democratic State Convention on this subject. 

* * * 

TO ONE unfamiliar with the methods of political 
procedure and the history of political machinations 
in California the failure of the so-called "Republi- 
can" State Convention to act in accordance with the 
desires of the Republicans of the state, as expressed 
in the pledges made by many of the county conven- 
tions, would appear inexplicable. But not so — not 
in the least — to those who have studied the history 
of the Southern Pacific political bureau, which mas- 
querades now, as for forty years past, in the habila- 
ments of the Republican party. To this shrewd 
outfit no desire of the people that is contrary to the 
wishes of the machine counts. Even if the Southern 

Pacific cabal had decided to go so far 

Were You as to insert into the state platform an 

Fooled? anti-gambling plank it would have 

been nothing but an assemblage of 
empty, meaningless words. Everybody knows that 
the machine does noj propose to let the legislature 
interfere with the sacred rights of its partners, the 
race track gamblers. Everybody knows that if, at 
the last moment, it changes its mind and permits 
one branch of the legislature to pass such a measure, 
the other house will throw it into the waste-paper 
basket ; or that, if passed by both houses, some pre- 
text may be found to induce the Herrin marionette 
occupying the executive chair in Sacramento to 
strangle it at birth. That we shall have no anti- 
race track gambling law as the outcome of the ap- 
proaching legislative session is as certain as that the 
Southern Pacific machinery will remain in motion 
until that time. 

SPEAKING of this platform, here is a plank 
therefrom which contains the quintessence of hu- 
mor: "We pledge our representatives in the State 



4 



Pacific Outlook 



Legislature to a wise and economical expenditure 
of the state funds. We favor the appointment of 
only such legislative attaches as are absolutely 
necessary for the prompt dispatch of the business 
of the legislature." When we recall the profligacy 
of the legislature which goes, out of business with 

the assembling of that to be 

Another chosen this fall, the scandalous 

Empty Promise "patronage" appropriation, the 

fact that that body fed political 
pap to more pets than are cared for by almost any 
other legislature in the United States, and when we 
remember that the men who were on guard at the 
last session will "run things" at the next, the prom- 
ises contained in this plank have about as much 
weight as the pledges regarding an anti-race track 
gambling law. The men who expect the next legis- 
lature to pay any attention whatever to this plank 
of superheated air are the men who have just re- 
moved to California from elsewhere. It is useless 
to endeavor to exploit the impossible. 

■£» «$• 4? 

A man is known better by the company he doesn't keep 
than by that which he does keep. 

* * * 

THE CAT has escaped from the bag. The so- 
called "red light district" is bombarded no more by 
the rays from the crimson transoms, but the streets 
are reported to be filled, at night, by former deni- 
zens of the precinct of which Commercial street is 
the center. The police have closed up the brothels, 
but they do not seem to be able to identify the 
former occupants of these houses when they see 
them parading the streets at night, advertising their 
trade by the various methods known to the initiated. 
The original haunts are closed, but vice is now on 
dress parade. There are those, suspicious of the 
motives of the powers that be, who have the tem- 
erity to suggest that this state of affairs is exactly 
what the mayor probably hoped to 
Vice on see come to pass. If such is not the 

Dress Parade case, the mayor and the police com- 
mission, which he controls, may give 
the lie to these rumor-mongers by directing the 
police to arrest and punish ever}? woman detected 
in the act of soliciting on the streets, clay or night, 
and making the order so emphatic that the eye- 
winkers in the department will understand that the 
mayor actually means what he says this time. The 
condition referred to, if half as bad as it has been 
described, is as nasty as that which has been ended. 
Such a state of affairs, if tolerated, will be as great 
a disgrace to the administration as was the exis- 
tence of the institutions which it allowed to remain 
open, in defiance of the law, until Mr. Woolwine 
injected a good measure of fear into the hearts of 
certain high authorities. If the mayor means busi- 
ness he can put an end to street soliciting in twenty- 
four hours. Will he? 

* * * 

Don't try to learn too much about other people. It is 
liable to make a cynic of you. 

* * + 

IN A RECENT communication to the Pacific 
Outlook a business man of Los Angeles strongly 
commended this paper for its attitude on the sub- 
ject of home patronage of home industries. "You 
cannot say too much about it," he declares. "The 



way some of the local merchants turn down things 
made in Los Angeles that they may reap a little 
more profit on foreign-made products, most of 
which are inferior to the home-made article, should 
be exposed. And the worst of it is that in some 
instances which have come under my personal ob- 
servation the local retailer will do everything he 
can to 'knock' the Los Angeles-made article in order 
to sell its counterpart made in the East." Further 
on in his communication he describes the manner 

in which sujch tactics react 
Home Patronage upon the "knocking" re- 
fer Home Industries tailer : "We manufacture 

, as you know. 

Well, a man went into a well-known retail house 
the other day and asked to see some of our stuff. 
What do you suppose the retailer did? He told the 
prospective customer that, while he kept our goods 
in stock, he would not advise him to purchase them, 
as they were 'poor goods'. A few minutes later, 
while looking over the stock on hand, the salesman 
admitted that he could not tell the difference be- 
tween ours and those of the foreign make! But he 
continued to 'knock', with the result that the cus- 
tomer became so disgusted that he went out, came 
to our factory, told us what had happened and 
asked us to see that he got what he wanted. We sup- 
plied another store with the goods, which in turn 
were delivered to this man, and the 'knocker' lost 
his employers a handy profit of something over 
sixty dollars." 

•fr * + 

IT IS HIGHLY inconsistent that any Los Angeles 
retailer should allow an incident of this kind to 
occur while, at the same moment, he is joining 
in the "Made in Los Angeles" cry. The policy is 
most unwise. Every new manufacturing concern 
that can be helped to occupy a paying basis adds 
materially to the substantiality of the city. We 
need manufactures more than anything else. A 
thousand factories giving employment to twelity 
men each are immensely better for the city than one 
factory employing twenty thousand hands. No 
honest manufacturer, who produces an article as 
good, or approximately as good, as that produced 
elsewhere should be discouraged by 
Should Stand local retailers, and every salesman 

Together who is detected in the act of "knock- 
ing" a locally manufactured article, 
especially when he knows it to have merit, should 
be forced to seek another job. There is no doubt 
that if manufacturing in this city is to be developed 
to extensive proportions it must follow an increas- 
ing local demand. The retailer who "knocks" or 
refuses to handle home-made products possessing 
merit would be the first to complain if he found 
that any considerable number of residents were do- 
ing their purchasing in New York or San Fran- 
cisco. A "stand together" policy, harmonious and 
intimate relations between the producer and the 
seller, will make for the rapid development of the 
manufacturing industries of Los Angeles. 

Men may come and men may go, but the Southern 
Pacific habit goes on forever. 

* * * 

THE SEEDS of decay that were sown in the 
ranks of the American Press Humorists' Associa- 



Pacific Outlook 



f the annual assemblag 
summer ari 
ruit. B) ombinations of cir- 

cum- the "didn't know it was loaded" 

re commonly called 
pellcd E. A. Brininstool of the 
of this city, at the instigation of a fellow- 
inerist" whose hearl overflowed with envy or 
ch abstract quality. The 
Yoomerists' whole proceeding was one which 
Serious Side disgusted the majority of the mem- 
bers of the association, judging 
the state of affairs this year. Fewer than twenty- 
five per cent of its members have paid their annual 
dues sinci meeting and many of 

the hie; men in the organization have cut loose from 
it. Practically none of the really noted humorists 
of the country attended the recent meeting in Den- 
ver. It is evident that the Yoomerists have a seri 
and thoughtful side. They don't see fun in every- 
thing, particularly in an effort to besmirch the repu- 
tation of one of their kind without giving him an 
opportunity to tell his side of the story. 
* + + 
To be in the political swim does not mean that a man 
is making a clean record. 

+ * * 
IN A STORY in a recent number of the Saturday 
Evening Post, a satire on the "tourists", the "taur- 
ines" and the "tourettes" who "do" Yellowstone 
Park, the Yosemite Valley and other great western 
wonders of nature, the author brings into action a 
nn Swede whc) inquires, at almost every turn 
of the road with its fresh marvels, if nothing has 
been done toward the economic development of the 
geysers, the cascades, the breezes and even the 
bear hugs. We would surmise that it must be this 
Swedish tourist, or some of his tribe, in whose brain 
has been evolved the magnificent scheme to convert 
Mount Yesusvius into a world utility, were it not 
for the fact that the cable brings the information 
that the author of the project is an "anonymous 
American". He prefaces the outline of his project 
by remarking that cemeteries are so many plague 
spots, which should be abolished the world over by 
international law. When this is 
An End on done, he declares, an American trust 
Plague Spots stands ready to build a colossal fleet 
of funeral ships, which would ply be- 
tween the principal ports of the world and Naples, 
conveying the dead of all nations to the Bay of 
Naples, where the remains would be reverently re- 
ceived by representatives of all religious and ethical 
faiths of the universe in permanent residence at the 
foot of the mountain. Automatic railways would 
thence convey the corpses to the mouth of the 
crater, in whose abyss millions of sons of men divid- 
ed in life would in death be united in everlasting 
peace. The creator of this unusual and apparently 
beneficial scheme forestalls tlje imagined objections 
of Neopolitans by adding that "so extravagantly de- 
vout a populace would rather welcome as showers 
of blessings any such abundant hail of ancestral 
ashes." Possibly this "anonymous American" once 
resided temporarily in Patton, California. 

Somebody has defined a cynic as "a man who knows 
the price of everything and the value of nothing". 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

NEW JERSEY is holding the Fort, and the Fort 
is holding New Jersey well in line among the law- 



abidin ion. The saloon element in 

AUant ime he it to them, by some 

of the so-called better element, including certain 
ministers, according to the newspaper accountsl — 

twinkled it- fingers at the end of its nose, SO to 

it were, when Governor hurt notified 

people that tin -tale law relative to the sale 
of intoxicating liquors must be observed. What 
followed i- known i .iid of the country to 

1 he other. The bluffing of the liquor men and their sup- 

s, who appeared to include pretty nearly every- 
body at this famous seaside resort, continued up lo 

the very hour when Governor Fort said the saloons 
■ ' U ninety per cent i if the pi >pula- 

tinn of Atlantic City expected to see 
A Real thi remain open last Sunday. 

Governor But discretion was identified as the bet- 
ter part of valor and the whiskey men 

surprised themselves and nearly everybody else by 
shutting up shop when the fateful moment arrived. 
The law says they must close, and all that Governor 
Fort asked was that the law should be observed. 
Would to heaven that we had a few more executives 
like him ; particularly do we wish that we had one 
just a little hit like him in California. What a sight 
it would be to behold Governor Gillett, for one soli- 
tary moment, in the act of compelling the Southern 
Pacific railroad, for instance, to abide by almost any 
one of the numerous laws ordained for its govern- 
ance! But to hope for any such thing as this to 
come to pass is to hope in vain. Governor Gillett 
is no Fort. The latter is governor for the people. 
Gillett is Harriman's handy man. No Southern Pa- 
cific lawbreaker need fear anything while his friend 
Gillett wields the executive pen. 

* * + 

The peanut-brained man usually has a higher estimate 
of himself than any of his friends have; and skimmed milk 
sometimes masquerades as cream. 

* * * 

SOMEONE has blundered and the city is to be 
put to an unnecessary expense of something more 
than fifty thousand dollars. The lime discovered 
on the spot where the aqueduct board is erecting a 
cement plant is found to be of such poor quality that 
it cannot be used in the work, and the city must 
build a railroad six or seven miles to a limestone 
quarry which will afford the genuine ar- 
Costly tide. This state of affairs is not due to 
Mistake any dereliction on the part of the board, 
directly, but is said to be chargable to an 
expert employed by that body. W r hoever may be 
responsible should be discharged at once from the 
city's employ. In this way, and in this way alone, 
can the board keep faith with Los Angeles. Under 
the most favorable circumstances considerable 
money is bound to be wasted during the progress of 
the giant work now in hand, and the greatest vigi- 
lance is necessary to prevent recurrences, on a large 
or small scale, of the untoward incident of the 
worthless limestone. 

«fr • ♦ 

If you make up your mind not to trouble trouble until 
trouble troubles you, the chances are that you will seldom 
be troubled. 

* * * 

THE LITTLE CITY of Pomona has set an ex- 
ample for towns which are officered by weak-kneed 
and spineless men. It has secured from the United 
States Circuit Court a decision of great and far- 
reaching importance. The Sunset Telephone Com- 



Pacific Outlook 



pany, which operates both telegraph and telephone 
lines and transacts both a local and an interstate 
business, thought to trample upon the right of that 
city to control its own streets and erected telephone 
poles without having first gone through the formal- 
ity of securing a franchise from the city trustees. 
Under the leadership of Robert G. Loucks of this 
city, then city attorney of Pomona, the municipal 
authorities waged war against the telephone com- 
pany, contending that cities have the right to con- 
trol their streets and to compel all telephone cor- 
porations to obtain franchises before 
Old Rights erecting poles and stringing wires on 
Still Exist the streets. This corporation, like 
many another of its kind, sought to 
ridicule and bluff the people of Pomona into "lay- 
ing down" on their right, but they had not "sized 
up" young Loucks. They know him better now. 
Convinced that the rights of the city would be sus- 
tained by the higher courts, he carried the case to 
the United States Court, inasmuch as interstate 
business was involved, and now Judge Wellborn 
has rendered a decision that municipalities may de- 
mand and insist upon compensation for the use of 
their streets by public service corporations. In all 
probability the course of the telephone company was 
a bluff from the beginning to the end, but though 
this sort of bluff has worked in hundreds of in- 
stances it has failed in Pomona. We look to sec 
other cities following the example set by the sturdy 
little town to the east of Los Angeles. The people 
are learning that the rights they enjoyed before 
telephone companies sprang into life still exist. 

* * * 

No man may make a balloon ascension in Austria until 
he obtains his wife's consent in writing. When a man 
may not get off the earth on his own responsibility the 
time for reform surely has arrived. 

* * * 

AS A STEP toward self-preservation, the rail- 
road magnates of the country should call a conven- 
tion and advise Theodore P. Shonts, president of 
three railroad companies, to resign his office or keep 
a closer guard over his garrulous tongue. A few 
days ago President Shonts delivered an address in 
Iowa in which he said, according to the newspaper 
reports: "We still have hope that we are going to 
be let alone and allowed to run our own business. 
Destroy that hope and we will have in this country 
an era of misery that will send to eternal damnation 
those who are responsible for it !" Whew! "If this 
be the threat of arrogance, make the most of it," 
Shonts might have added; for that is exactly the 
way his words will be generally interpreted. Pick- 
pockets, burglars, highwaymen, thugs, brothel keep- 
ers, racetrack gamblers and most rail- 
The Real roads just want to be "let alone". "If 
"Reds" you don't let us alone, if you don't quit 
trying to enforce the laws enacted for 
the purpose of compelling us to be as honest as we 
have to be," yell arrogant railroad men like Shonts, 
"we will make you sick of your job!" These thick- 
headed men seem to have an idea that the ground on 
which their rails are laid is their own private prop- 
erty, in spite of the decisions of the Supreme Court 
of the United States to the contrary. The people 
do not intend to let them alone any more than a 
householder who finds a thief in his house will let 
the latter alone, if he is the stronger and the braver 
of the two. And we think the great masses of the 
people are stronger and braver than all the railroad 



presidents in the country. The people will let the 
railroads alone when the railroads "attend to their 
own business" honestly. . So long as they remain 
rascals the real owners of the highways of commerce 
will fight to reform them. Men like Shonts are the 
cornerstones of Twentieth Century anarchism fac- 
tories. 

* * * 

When the candidate for the legislature from your dis- 
trict asks you to vote for him, ask him, in return, how he 
stands on the anti-race track gambling proposition. 
•I* t$» ■ .*. 

WHILE OTHER states are exhibiting keen in- 
terest in the subject of three planting, California re- 
mains a little backward in this respect. Massachu- 
setts is setting an example that might be emulated 
with splendid results in this state. Years ago it 
established the office of state forester. At the late 
session of the legislature five thousand dollars were 
appropriated to be spent this year, and ten thou- 
sand dollars annually hereafter, in the purchase of 
lands deemed by him to be adapted to the produc- 
tion of trees. One-fifth of the money authorized to 
be spent may be used for the distribution, at about 
cost, of seeds and seedling trees ; all the remainder 
shall be devoted to replanting and other manage- 
ment of the state's tracts. A splendid pro- 
Plant vision is that the original owners of the 
Trees land or their heirs may repurchase the land 
at any time within ten years after its pur- 
chase by the state upon paying the price originally 
paid by the state and the amount expended in main- 
tenance and improvements, with interest at the rate 
of four per cent per annum. A law of this kind 
would be beneficial to any state. In California, in 
particular, where many varieties of trees grow easily 
and quickly, many of them with no irrigation after 
the first year or two of growth, its beneficent nature 
is instantly apparent. We need trees, especially in 
the flat portions of the state. If the state will under- 
take the work it not only will find it profitable, be- 
yond any reasonable doubt, but it will in this man- 
ner encourage private individuals to engage in the 
work, to the profit of themselves and to the general 
welfare of the state. 

* * * 

It may be true that charity should begin at home, but 
the trouble is that the average man wants to keep his at 
home all the time. 

+ * * 

E. R. THOMAS, the man who raced his car into 
a coach at Long Branch several days ago, resulting 
in a disaster which has been fully described in the 
daily papers, "may have a stiff leg the remainder of 
his life." Thus says a news dispatch. He will get 
off easily if he suffer nothing worse than a life of 
stiff-leggedness. As a rule it is the man in front 
of the car, not at its steering gear, who suffers 
through the wild criminality of the speed maniac. 
The rate at which helpless pedestrians are being 
killed and wounded in all parts of the 
Light country almost prompts one to wish that 
Penalty we might apply the ancient Mosaic law in 
the cases of such wantons as the average 
speed-crazy automobilist. It is a matter for con- 
gratulation, however, that the automobile organiza- 
tions throughout the country are doing all in their 
power to discourage racing on public thoroughfares. 
They will make it unpopular in time : but there will 
always be a fair quota of Little Slyder Downhilles 
who are willing to limp through life with lame con- 






Pacific Outlook 



wn with death ami injury 
rather than be deprived "f the exhilaration ol 

ing i im catapults into thi 

" i tit; blue. 

+ + + 

Theodore Bell declares, unequivocally, that he KNOWS 
that Bryan is to be elected. That makes two that we 
have heard of. 

+ + + 

The World's Progress 
From September 9 until the 13th the nineteenth 
international Eucharist will meet in 

London. It wil lie the most notable assembly of 
the prince- of the church, of priest- and laymen that 
has ever met outside of the Eternal City. The ob- 
ject of the congress will be to make a public mani- 
of faith in the dogma of the real presence 
and by reading of papers and discussion upon them 
to increase the knowledge and devotion of the faith- 
ful in regard to the mystery of their belief. Such is 
the significance that the Vatican attaches to these 
congresses that for some years at Metz, Rome, 

Paris. Brussels, and Jerusalem the reigning pontiff 
has appointed a special legate to preside over them. 

No little disappointment has been caused by the 
resi lution passed by the bishops of the Anglican 
church assembled at the Lambeth Conference with 
regard to the remarriage of innocent persons who 
have been through the divorce courts. Some jurists 
argue that the resolution is in direct contravention 
if not with the letter at least with the spirit of the 
Divorce act of 1857. as in that act no censure of any 
kind is implied toward the innocent party, while, 
even in the case of the guilty, nothing in the act pre- 
vents the marriage being solemnized in church. 

A Paris societv is collecting evidence in order to 
prove the need of an international marriage con- 
grc-s for the purpose of removing the inconven- 
iences arising from the different marriage conditions 
existing in the various countries of Europe. 

Proprietors of hotels at fashionable European re- 
sorts admit that the season about to close has been 
the poorest in many years. This has been due to 
the absence of rich Americans', who have remained 
at home in order to economize. 

Next to mining the greatest industry of South 
\frica is sugar growing. The amount of money in- 
vested in this is $7,300,000. The production of the 
present year is estimated at 40.000 tons, with a valu- 
ation of about $63 per ton. 

Coal production in Michigan in 1907 was fifty-one 
per cent greater in quantity and value than in 1906 
and the largest ever recorded in that state. The 
total output for the year was 2,035,858 short tons. 

Nathan Straus of New York declares he can cut 
the death rate among children in half by pasteuriz- 
ing all the milk they drink. 

The Transvaal produces 400.000 ounces of gold 
everv month. 

* + + 

More Words to Pronounce 

Humorist. Apricot. Details. 

Adults. Alternated. Origin. 

Embryo. Mechanist. Avenue. 

Plebeian. Imagery. Senile. 

Heraldic. Posterior. Casuistry. 

Plethoric. Recondite. Syrup. 

Diocesan. Inquiry. Patent (adjective). 



"Despoir" in Epigram 
By W'ii i.iaxi G ordan 

The funeral of hi 
Dangerous res .the unattainable. 

The last straw of discouragement on the b 
purpi 

Paralyzed energj >st rated hope. 

Tie soul's surrender i" the seeming inevitable. 

Turning one'- back on the future. 

The dead weight of a sorrow that no hand light- 
ens, 

-oul'- nighl \\ ithoul a star. 
Feeling the nothingness of fighting al a Waterloo 
of hope. 

+ + + 

The Chief Evil 

Bv Winston Ciukchiij. 

rile chief evil of the hour is the domination of 
politics by corporations, and this evil has its origin 
in the indifference and in the lack of knowledge of 
the American voter — a canker which threatens the 
life of the republic. The voter, in order to have 
more time to attend to liis own affairs, farms out his 
political rights to the boss. The corporations find 
the boss in power and are forced to pay him political 
blackmail. It is a natural and inevitable result that 
the corporations, when they grow strong enough, 
should in every state set up political machines of 
their own. It is cheaper to keep a standing army 
than to hire mercenaries. The great problem of the 
day upon which the future existence of the republic 
depends is whether the people of the United States 
will achieve and maintain enough interest in public 
affairs to elect men to public offices who will do 
exact justice to the great vested interests and still 
remain uninfluenced by them. 
• * + <• 

Herrin and PerKins 

Speaking of Senator Perkins reminds one of the 
story the Herrin understrappers are whispering 
cautiously among themselves concerning him. They 
say that, deep down in his heart, Herrin does not 
like Perkins a little bit, and would, if he could see 
half a chance to do it. retire the Senior Senator to 
private life, just as did Colonel Burns, even if Harri- 
man should order him to have his Legislature send 
the Senator back to Washington, says the Way- 
farer in the Oakland Enquirer. Perkins, as some 
of Herrin's lieutenants say, has "run out" on Herrin 
a time or two in California politics, although at 
Washington he has never given Harriman any cause 
for complaint. So, the Herrin people say, the Boss 
may have to swallow Perkins and order the Legis- 
lature to re-elect him to the Senate. But — and think 
of the cold-bloodedness of this ! — they say that Her- 
rin is comforting himself with the thought that 
Perkins is getting pretty well along in years and 
may die during Gillett's term as Governor. In 
which case, the story goes, Herrin will have the 
Governor appoint some younger and more active 
man to fill the vacancy. Just who would be Harri- 
man's choice under those circumstances, nobody 
seems to know. But the guesses range between 
George Knight. United States District Attorney 
Devlin and Lieutenant-Governor Porter. Devlin 
and Porter leading in the betting. Is not that a 
cold-blooded partitioning of the political estate of 
a live man in anticipation of his departure from 
this vale of tears? 



Pacific Outlook 




Another Story by Hans Christian Andersen "WHicK May Be Made 

to Fit Almost Anywhere 



ill 



rag* N THE NURSERY a number of toys lay 

Hlffl strewn about. High up, on the wardrobe, 

™$§) stood the money-box, made of clay and pur- 
1 chased of the potter, and it was in the shape 
^of a little pig. Of course the pig had a slit 
in his back, and this slit had been so enlarged with a 
knife that whole dollar pieces could slip through; 
and, indeed, two such had slipped into the box, be- 
sides a number of pence. The Money-Pig was 
stuffed so full that it could no longer rattle, and that 
is the highest point of perfection a money-pig can 
attain. There it stood upon the cupboard high and 
lofty, looking down upon everything else in the 
room. It knew very well that what it had in its 
stomach would have bought all the toys, and that is 
what we call having self-respect. 

The others thought of that too, even if they did 
not exactly express it, for there were many other 
things to speak of. One of the drawers was half 
pulled out, and there lay a great handsome Doll, 
thought she was somewhat old, and her neck had 
been mended. She looked out and said : 

"Now we'll play at men and women, for that is 
always something." 

And there was a general uproar, and even the 
framed prints on the walls turned round and showed 
that there was a wrong side to them ; Imt they did 
not do it to protest against the proposal. 

It was late at night; the moon shone through the 
window-frames and afforded the cheapest light. The 
game was now to begin, and all, even the children's 
Go-Cart, which certainly belonged to the coarser 
playthings, were invited to take part in the sport. 

"Each one has his own peculiar value," said the 
Go-Cart; "we cannot all be noblemen. There must 
be some who do the work, as the saying is." 

The Money-Pig was the only one who received 
a written invitation, for he was of high standing, 
and they were afraid he would not accept a verbal 
message. Indeed, he did not answer to say whether 
he would come, nor did he come. If he was to take 
a part, he must enjoy the sport from his own home; 
they were to arrange accordingly, and so they did. 

The little toy theater was now put up in such a 
way that the Money-Pig could look directly in. 
They wanted to begin with a comedy, and after- 
wards there was to be a tea-party and a discussion 
for mental improvement, and with this latter part 
they began immediately. The Rocking-Horse spoke 
of training and race, the Go-Cart of railways and 
steam power, for all this belonged to their profes- 
sion, and it was quite right that they should talk of 
it. The Clock talked politics — ticks-ticks — and knew 
what was the time of day, though it was whispered 
he did not go correctly. The Bamboo Cane stood 
there, stiff and proud, for he was conceited about 
his brass ferule and his silver top, for being thus 
bound above and below; and on the sofa lay two 
worked Cushions, pretty and stupid, and now the 
play began. 

A'll sat and looked on, and it was requested that 



the audience should applaud and crack and stamp 
according as they were gratified. But the Riding- 
Whip said he never cracked for old people, only for 
young ones who were not yet married. 

"•I crack for everything," said the Cracker. 

All these were the thoughts they had while the 
play went on. The piece was worthless, but it was 
well played. All the characters turned their painted 
sides to the audience, for they were so- made that 
they should only be looked at from that side, and 
not from the other ; and all played wonderfully 
well, coming out quite beyond the lamps, because 
the wires were a little too long, but chat only made 
them come out the more. The darned Doll was 
quite exhausted with excitement — so thoroughly ex- 
hausted that she burst at the darned place in her 
neck, and the 'Money-Bag was so enchanted in his 
way that he formed the resolution to do something 
for one of the players, and to remember him in his 
will as the one who should: be buried with him in 
the family vault, when matters were so far ad- 
vanced. 

It was true enjoyment, such true enjoyment that 
they quite gave up the thoughts of tea, and only 
carried out the idea of mental recreation. That's 
what they called playing at men and women ; and 
there was nothing wrong to it, for they were only 
playing ; and each one thought of himself and 
what the Money-Pig might think;, and the 
Money-Pig thought farthest of all, for he thought 
of making his will and of his burial. And 
when might this come to pass? Certainly far sooner 
than was expected. Crack ! It fell down from the 
cupboard — fell to the ground, and was broken to 
pieces ; and the pennies hopped and danced in 
comical style. The little ones turned round like 
tops, and the bigger ones rolled away, particularly 
the one great silver dollar who wanted to go out into 
the world. And he came out into the world, and 
they all succeeded in doing so. And the pieces of 
the Money-Pig were put into the dust-bin; but the 
next day a new Money-Pig was standing on the 
cupboard. It had not yet a farthing in its stomach, 
and therefore could not rattle, and in this it was like 
the other. And that was a beginning — and with 
that we will make the end. 

* * * 

Roses 

By Dorothy Russsv, Lewis 
Heavy headed, velvet lipped, 
With your gold hearts, pollen tipped, 
Full of fragrance yet unsipped, 
How your glory shineth through 
Those bright mists of morning dew 
Into which, by fairies, you 
Have been dipped! 

And at twilight, in the gleam 
Of the pale moon's silver beam, 
What a wondrous host you seem! 
For your petals, roses bright, 
Folded closely for the night, 
Seem to shine with starry light 
■While you dream. 



Pacific Outlook 



"Which Do You Lihe Best? 

the interesting thi 
cent convention of the oving picture nun in New 
York wore tl ations un- 

der which moving pictures have been exhibited 
■ the invention of the first machine. The list is 

Animal thmoscope, Animaloscope, 

Amusograph, Vctogi ph, Vmmotojcope, Biograph, 

nedy- 
rminograph, Choreutoscope, 
Chronophotograpl tscope, Cinnemono- 

graph, Cintograph, Cinematoscope, Counterfivi- 
hriterioscope, Cineograph, Diaramiscope, 
ngraph, Entertaii Electroscope, Ere- 

graph, Funoscope, Gi themoneyoscope, Grandiscope, 
Hynoscope, Heliographiscope, [doloscope, tn 
graph, Kinotograph, Kineatigraph, Katoplukum, 
Kinetograph, Kinetoscope, Kineograph, Kinegraph- 
oscopc. Kincoi . Kineovotograph, {Cinema- 

tograph, Kinodrome, Klondoscope, Laughoscope, 
Lumigraph, Lobsterscope, Lifescope, Magniscope, 
Motophotoscope,Mimiscope,Muscalariscope, Movo- 
scopc. Mophotoscope, Mesmeriscope, Ouimete- 

pe, Optigraph, Originagraph, Projectograph, 
Pantomimeograph, Photoscope, Parleograph, Pic- 
torialograph, Photokinematiscope, Phototrope, 
Phonedoscope, Phan.tibiograph, Phantiscope, Pano- 
ramoscope, Physograph, Rythmograph, Rayoscope, 
Stereopligraph, Stinnetiscope, Seenamatograph, See- 
oscope, Scenoscope, Sygmographiscope, Shadow- 
graphiscope, Selfseminograph, Stroboscope, Thea- 
trograph, Tragiscope, Thromotrope, Tounialoscope, 
Tachyscope, Thaumolotrope, Thopograph, Urbani- 
scope, Vitograph, Vileocigraphoscope, Vileograph, 
Visionoscope, Variscope, Vinetroscope, Yitrescope, 
\ itopticon, Vitascope, Viascope, Waterscope, Won- 
derscope, X-ograph, Zoopraxiscope, Zoatrope and 
Zoptotropc. 

* * * 

Leprosy Not Disappearing' 

The Rev. Father L. L. Conrardy, M. D., a friend 
and companion of the priest-leper of Hawaii, the 
late Father Damien, was in Hongkong recently in 
furtherance of the plans to establish a' leper settle- 
ment near Canton for the Chinese. 

Unlike the views of Dr. Darlington of the New 
York Health Board expressed recently, that leprosy 
is no longer regarded as dangerous or contagious, 
Father Conrardy contends that the disease is not 
disappearing but on the contrary still exists in 
nearly every country in the world, and in. some 
places is so prevalent that specialists fear it may 
again become as common as it was in certain parts 
of Europe during the Middle Ages. 

Father Conrardy says that the governing bodies 
of many nations have realized that leprosy is a 
disease with which medical scicn.ee cannot cope and 
therefore have adopted measures for the isolation 
of the victims of the malady. China is not among 
this number and the poor unfortunates are per- 
mitted to roam at will, outcasts of society, drag- 
ging out a miserable existence. 

It is among such that Father Conrardy has gone 
to work, and his self-sacrificing band of men and 
women, will minister to the physical infirmities of 
the thousands of Kwangtung as soon as the neces- 
sary preliminary requirements are completed and 



the initial plans f< i the establishment of the settle- 
ment in the neighbor!). perfected 
and carried out. 1:: such a g 

rardv will without doubt enlist the sympathy and 

will i.i' the ( eminent and its people. 

lie was born in lielgium, al-o the home of Father 

Damien. in 1841, and early in life decided to devote 

his energies and life to the cause of those bereft of 
fortune, After being ordained a priest he wenl to 

America and went West, and for fourteen years 
labored among the Indians, and then for some years 
among the Hind...., in the islands of the southwest. 
Hi-- health failing, he returned to Portland 
several years went as assistant to Fathei Damien 
VIolokai. \fiev seven years among the |i 
hal island he came back to America and then 
wenl to China to investigate the leper situation 

there. lie awful conditions existing (here tiled 
him with zeal in behalf of those afflicted people, and 
he at once conceived the idea of forming a colony 

for the cut of (he lepers near Canton. 

Father Conrard\ first became interested in the 

work ..I Father Damien through the newspapers 
and when he proffered his services to the martyr 
..f Molokai. in 1878, they were declined, ;i-- al the 
time they were not immediately needed. But when 
the pioneer among the workers in Molokai con- 
tracted the fatal disease and he fell that the end 
was approaching and needed a coadjutor in the la- 
bor of love he had imposed upon himself, be sent for 
Father Conrardy. who, as already stated, became 
the companion of Damien. until the death of the 
latter. 

After being replaced at Kalawao. Molokai, in 
1896, by the brother of Father Damien, and having 
witnessed the affection and gratitude of the Hawai- 
ian lepers, and having learned of the wretched con- 
dition of the Chinese lepers, Father Conrardy de- 
cided to go to China and care for the latter. 

+ + + 

Xhs Bishop Was Saved 

The English Bishop of Litchfield tells an amusing 
sitory of a railway journey he once took in a third- 
class carriage. Seated opposite to him were a 
couple of rough working-men, who had evidently 
dined not wisely, but too well. Presently one of 
them began to complain that he had been robbed 
of a five-pound note, and expressed his determina- 
tion to ask his fellow-passengers ito turn out their 
pockets. Dr. Maclagan began to feel very uncom- 
fortable, for, as it happened, he himself had a five- 
pound note in his pocket. "However," says his 
Grace when he relates the story, "I sat quietly, and 
pretended to- be asleep." Presently ithe man who 
had lost the note touched him on the arm, but still 
Dr. Maclagan feigned to be asleep. Just as he was 
beginning to wonder what would happen next, the 
other workman called out lustily to his mate : "Come 
on. Bill, leave 'im alone. Can't you see 'e's drunker 
than yerself?" 

The Smallest Boat 

There is on show now in Rome a tiny boat 
formed of a single pearl. Its sail is of beaten gold, 
studded with diamonds, and its headlight, carried 
at the prow, is a perfect ruby. An emerald serves 
as its rudder, and its stand is a slab of ivory. It 
weighs less than half an ounce, and its price is 
said to be $5,000, 



10 



Pacific Outlook 




A. Newcomer from Indiana Tahes Exceptions to Some Things 
He Has Seen and Heard in Los Angeles 



b«=« HE clanger line wasn't very far away, 
lUlii was ''• "' Kn I touched upon the sub- 
«^23§j ject of equal suffrage, or woman's rights? 
S.I have received from the editor of the Pa- 
1 cific Outlook four letters from Los Angeles 
champions of equal suffrage, all taking me to task 
for making light of a serious political movement. 
Besides this he sent me a little pamphlet somebody 
had mailed him, entitled "Why Women Should 
Vote," by Alice Stone Blackwell. Now, ladies, I 
really did not intend to be understood as assailing 
equal suffrage or questioning the right of women 
to vote, if they want to. All I suggested, or in- 
tended to suggest, was that, for the time being, or 
until men were in a more tractable frame of mind, 
women should devote their energies toward the edu- 
cation of their male relatives of voting age. 

The little tract written by Miss, or Mrs., Black- 
well is worth reading, although, I must confess, it is 
not entirely convincing. She advances what she 
regards as conclusive arguments in behalf of equal 
suffrage. Her first is. to me, the greatest : "Because 
it is fair and right that those who must obey Ihe 
laws should have a vote as to the size of the tax and 
the way it shall be spent." I guess that's so. (Why 
on earth won't you give me a pointer, Mr. Editor, 
on how California's present voting population feels 
on this matter? Or don't you know? Still, it does 
not seem to matter much how the voters feel. 
Everything is up to the bosses in this state, if I am 
able to read between the lines.) 

Here are some other reasons advanced by this 
writer : 

"Because the moral, educational and humane leg- 
islation desired by women would be got more easily 
if women had votes," 

"Because laws unjust to women would be amend- 
ed more quickly." 

"Because disfranchisement helps to keep wages 
down." 

"Because equal suffrage would increase the pro- 
portion of educated voters." 

"Because it would increase the proportion of na- 
tive-born voters." 

"Because it would increase the moral and law- 
abiding vote very much, while increasing the vicious 
and criminal vote very litle." 

"Because it leads to fair treatment of women in 
the public service." 

"Because legislation for the protection of children 
would be secured more easily." 

"Because it is the quietest, easiest, most dignified 
and least conspicuous way of influencing public af- 
fairs. It takes much less expenditure of time, labor 
and personal presence to go up to the ballot box, 
drop in a slip of paper, and then come away, than to 
persuade a multitude of miscellaneous voters to vote 
right." (But are we sure that the women them- 
selves will always vote right — vote intelligently?) 

"Because it would like" (makes) "women more 



broadminded." 

"Because woman's ballot would make it harder 
for notoriously band candidates to be nominated or 
elected." 

"Because it would increase woman's influence." 

"Because it would help those women who need 
help the most." 

"Because it is a maxim in war, 'Always do the 
thing to which your adversary particularly ob- 
jects.' " 

"Because experience" (and here she gets down to 
the real thing) "has proved it to be good. Women 
have for years been voting, literally by hundreds of 
thousands, in England, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, 
New Zealand, Canada, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, 
Utah and Idaho. In all these places put together 
the opponents have not yet found a dozen respect- 
able men who assert over their own names and ad- 
dresses" (but men are moral cowards, dear madam 
or miss, when it comes to risking woman's fury) 
"that the results have been bad, while scores of 
prominent men and women testify that it has done 
good. An ounce of fact is worth a ton of theory." 

I wonder what our Mr. Herrin thinks about it. It 
strikes me that, just now, this is of vastly more con- 
sequence than what the voters of California think 
about it. And I wonder if this idea has ever ap- 
pealed to the advocates of equal suffrage in Califor- 
nia — to get some sort of statement from the real 
ruler of California. It surely is worth going after. 

I discovered the other day a species of fraud which 
touches closely many of the most important busi- 
ness interests of the community. It was nothing 
more or less than a "deal" in copying ribbons for 
typewriters. Nearly every commercial house in the 
country uses typewriters in the transaction of its 
business, and no house which enters into contracts 
or which employs any sort of a system can get 
along without having copies made of all important 
letters it sends out. While calling upon the manager 
of one of our big concerns a few days ago we were 
interrupted by the head of the sales department, 
who made to his chief the amazing announcement 
that when he had gone to the files of the business 
transacted less : than three years before he had found, 
in place of the carbon copy of a certain contract he 
was looking for, which he had beeen called upon 
to duplicate by a good customer, nothing but a 
couple of sheets of blank paper ! 

This was not all, however. Investigation re- 
vealed the fact that in the place of hundreds — per- 
haps thousands of them exists — of copies once made 
nothing but similar blank sheets of paper were to 
be found. 

As the manager of the establishment glanced hur- 
riedly through the filing cabinets, coming closer and 
closer to the present year, the sheets were found to 
contain copies growing in distinctness as their ages 
grew less, until finally, reaching letters and con- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



trat • id to 

lint <■ two 

and .1 half >• • mOfc had become entirely 

■Hie. 

The head of th< irtment stepped to the 

telepl I asked the manager of a !.>cal type- 

writ . the office. When tin- 

latter arrived the situation was explained t.> him 
lution asked. 

"It i^ very simple," replied the typewriter expert. 
"Th« vere not made with genuine carbon 

paper. There arc numerous concerns in the coun- 
try which manufacture a cheap variety of copying 
paper, which they call carbon, but it is nothing more 
than paper which has been treated to certain dyes 

which fade in tlu if two or three years — 

limes in a briefer period. Genuine carbon 

never fades. It is in. -re expensive, of course, but 

the matter of expense should cut no figure with a 

concern which wants to keep copies of its contracts 
or correspondence." 

"Well, if that isn't a rank swindle !" ejaculated nn 
friend, the head of the house. 

"Yes. it is pretty rough on the business man." re- 
plied the typewriter man. "This imitation 'carbon' 
paper costs about thirty-three cents per hundred 
sheets: but it isn't worth one cent — in fact, any sup- 
ply house which furnishes it under any sort of a 
guarantee should be prosecuted. The damage liable 
to follow cannot be estimated." 

I have been wondering how many merchants and 
manufacturers of Los Angeles have been "bitten" 
in the purchase of this particular kind of fraud "car- 
bon" paper. 'Seems to me it behooves everv busi- 
ness man in the city to look over his old files and 
see whether the records are distinct or extinct. 

Out in my part of the town resides a man who 
owns the majority of the lots facing the street in 
front of a certain block. Practically every other 
man in the neighborhood wants that street paved. 
But do you suppose all the influences that can be 
brought to bear upon this man to persuade him to 
join the movement have availed? No. Not only 
this, but while about every other property owner is 
improving his lot by building upon it. thereby en- 
hancing the value of real estate in that vicinity, this 
man sits back and lets the work of others increase 
the value of his own property, refusing to spend a 
dollar in improvements and declining to ask for 
street improvement. And the worst of it all is that 
this same man's name is frequently mentioned in 
the newspapers as that of a public-spirited citizen, 
etc.. etc. Mankind in Los Angeles is much the same 
as it is the world over. I suppose. Self is still king. 
< lur neighbor's dog fattens on bones he gets any- 
where except in the back yard of his owner, and 
the man who does least for his fellowman usually 
gets the credit for doing the most. The man who 
lets others work for him and never does a thing for 
these others in return has the smuggest coun- 
tenance. He has little to worry him. Like the 
other kind of hog he grunts with satisfaction as he 
fattens at the expense of another. 

I wish I might take a census of Los Angeles with 
the idea of ascertaining how many men who have 
been "successful in real estate" have succeeded at 
the expense of their neighbors, as in the case of the 
man to whom I have referred. 

STIMULUS. 




We 

Pay 

Special 

Attention 

To 

Our 



optical department 

In charge of a State Registered Graduate Optician 

We guarantee a perfect fit in every case at most 

reasonable prices. 

Brigden & Pedersen Co. 

Manufacturing Jewelers, Watchmakers and Opticians 
Hotel Alexandria 507 South Spring St. 



The Touch that Makes the Home Artistic 

Interior decorating is a science — learned only by 
long experience. The blending nf wall finishes, 
draperies, etc., with floor coverings and furniture 
in a harmonious manner is an art. This feature of 
our business is given special prominence. We carry 
a lar.ne slock — wall papers, fabrics, etc.; we are 
equipped to do superior work. We can assure satis- 
faction. 

Ip-s^ncjeles furniture C°- 

631-633-635 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Between SIXTH and SEVENTH STREETS 

Furnlturv, Ca.rpetd.Rugd. Draperies and Wall Papers 
Exclusive Productions of Highest Character 



The Temple of Art Building 

TS now in the course of construction on Grand 

Ave., near 7th St. This will be the only 

thoroughly equipped building in Los Angeles 

devoted to art studios and assembly halls. 

For further information apply to 

W. H. JENKINS, Mgr., 



Tel. E-1467 
Temporary Office, 1811 Orange Street 



Phone F 4146 Mail Orders 

WESTERN GEM CO. 

2206 S. MAIN ST.. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

CUTTERS AND DEALERS IN PRECIOUS STONES 

JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER 



M. NATHANSON 

LADIES - TAILOR 

and "' 

HABIT MAttER 

...Highest Class Tailoring at Moderate Prices... 
216 Mercantile Place 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



WliicH Is Nature FaKingJ? 

Mr. Charles F. Lummis and Mr. Dane Coolidge, 
or one of them, had better beware. The Nature 
Fakir Killer is still with us. The obscurities of the 
Dark Continent have not yet swallowed him and 
his square-dealing Stick and Spear, writes an editor 
of the New York Times. Yet Mr. Coolidge has 
temeratiously affixed his name to an article- in The 
Metropolitan Magazine for September entitled "The 
Gentle Art of Photographing Rattlesnakes," which 
says among other things : 

"As snakes are very sensitive to heat, I carry on 
my photography not later than an hour after sun- 
rise, and even then the alleged hardy rattlesnake 
will seldom stand more than ten minutes of sun- 
shine before he drops his jaw and begins to froth 
at the mouth. Five minutes' exposure to the mid- 
day sun will kill the ordinary desert rattlesnake, or 
any other desert reptile, for that matter." 

To this unqualified statement we oppose these 
verses by Mr. Lummis in the current number of Out 
West, a magazine which he edits— which represents 
the horned rattlesnake, locally known as the South- 
west sidewinder, in a soliloquizing mood : 

A lazy loop of lozenged gray, 

I stretch amid the sand and sun, 
Or writhe a sullen yard away, 

The greasewood's creeping shade to shun. 

The hot earth nestles to' my chin; 

My lidless eyes outface the sky 
All unabashed, and dry and thin 

My unawakened rattles lie. 

The desert glare that does to death 

The blind unlovers of the sun — 
Poor fools, that court a colder breath. 

Nor know that heat and life are one. 

It filters through my scaly still, 

It simmers to one drop of Fate — 
The mother-tincture of To Kill. 

Quintessence of a whole world's hate. 

'Content I dream — content is deep. 

For whom three mortal joys there be — 
My own white sun, my ardent sleep, 

And sleep for him that wakens me! 

From the desert glare and the simmering, filter- 
ing sunshine, Mr. Lummis's serpent details the 
greenish venom that is "sleep for him that wakens 
me." Mr. Coolidge declares distinctly that the sun 
is the rattlesnake's bane. He, too, is describing the 
rattlesnake of California and Arizona, where he pre- 
tends to have captured the chill-producers for mar- 
ket since 1897. Mr. Lummis says he made his ob- 
servations and wrote his verses seventeen years ago, 
Surely, the fate of these gentlemen is not enviable. 

♦ ' ♦ ♦ 
A Toast 

Here's to the things we should have said, 

Witty, satirical, farcical, neat! 
That bubble and sparkle and gleam in the head 

When th'e chance has fled on its light-winged feet! 
When the goblet and guest and the hour are gone 
And we're homeward 'bound on the road alone! 

"Here's to the things we would have said!" 

So toast, I wager, on Stygian shore 
The chorus vast of the mighty dead. 

The writers of prose and verse galore! 
E'en Homer murmurs, "Oh, what a hit, 
If what I would have, I'd only writ!" 

* * + 
Retold 

Little drops of water, 

Little lack of sand, 
Make the frenzied panic 

And the wiser land. 

— fudge. 



SHIRTS 

OUR 

SPECIALTY 

Many new novelties in Patterns 
and Colorings. Also a com- 
plete line of nobby Neckwear, 
Hosiery and Handkerchiefs to 
match. 

223W. Fifth St. Troy Laundry Company 




Lee L. Powers 

ANTIQUE SHOP 

NOW AT 627 S. OLIVE ST. 



Rare and beautiful antiques in furniture, brass, china, 
etc. Visit our shop — you'll then have a better idea of 
the good times your great-great grandfather had. 




IMPERIAL 


VA LLE Y 


You will buy lots in 


the town of 




HEBER 




next Fall. Why not now? 


50 x 130 ft: lots, $100. 




Loftus &. Burnham 


Company, I 


nc. 


128 W. 6th St., GrosseBldg. 


Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



Be sure to see 

THE ?K DISAPPEARING BED 

The bed that does not fold up 
Economizes Floor Space, Furniture, Time, Labor and Money 
Display Rooms: 671-681 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



ANDIRONS— GRATES— FIRE SETS 

In Artistic Designs 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED TILES 

Pacific Tile & Mantel Co. ''"k^c^TREET 




Pacific Outlook 



13 




Mr.-, Jirah 1> O le, Jr.. who has been passing the 
summer in this citj ai na, and who is to 

K-avc Sept. 1-' for Chicago, was guest Wednesday at 
a musicale given 1>\ Miss Mary I.. < I'Donoughue at 
her home, No. 1043 South Alvarado street. The 
were Mr-. R. W. Poindexter, Mrs. 
Henry T. lie Mrs. lirah D. Cole Mrs. Charles 
nor of Pasadena. Sirs. J. < ;. Ogilvie, Mrs. Harry 
Giffbrd Lott, Mr-. [Catherine Kimball Forest. Mrs. 
Alma Wachtel, Miss Myra Hershey, Miss Frances 
Wills. Miss Ann Kavanaugh, Miss Jennie Winston. 
Miss Mary Lee, Miss Alice Coleman and Miss 
Joy- 
Miss Lena Turner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Turner, of No. 1136 West Thirty-sixth 
-. . became the bride of Or. Paul Allyn of W'aver- 
lv. 111-., at 8:30 o'clock Tuesday evening, the mar- 
taking place in the University Methodist 
church in the presence of many quests. Mrs. George 
Turner was matron of honor. Miss Sarah Miller was 
amid of honor, and the bridesmaids were Miss Clara 
Parmalee and Miss Lulu Cliff. George Turner acted 
as best man anil A. C. Macnab, Reginald Rayner and 
Roy Arnold were usher. 

In honor of Miss Helen Nay, daughter of Mrs. 
Noah North Nay. of Hollywood, whose marriage to 
Mr. Claude Cumnock, of Evanston, Ills., will take 
place Sept. 12, Miss Louise Lacey, of No. 1539 
Shatto street, entertained with a card party Tues- 
day afternoon. 

The engagement of Miss Jennie Nye Dietrich, 
daughter of Mrs. Philip Dietrich pf Diamond ave- 
nue, Pasadena, and John Lionel Judson, youngest 
son of Professor William Lee Judson, head of the 
college of fine arts. U. S. C. has been announced. 

Mrs. S. T. Barber of Detroit. Mich., who is visit- 
ing Mrs. W. E. Ramsey of Western avenue, was 
complimented guest Tuesday at a luncheon of 
twelve covers given by Mrs. Frederick A. Wann, of 
No. 920 West Twenty'-eigbth street. 

Mrs. Eyre Barrow-French, of No. 627 St. Paul 
avenue, was hostess at a luncheon of twelve covers 
given at the California club Wednesday in honor of 
her sister-in-law, Mrs. Harold S. Keating of Dallas, 
Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roswell R. Brownson, and their 
children, Willard II. Brownson second, and Caro- 
line, will leave next Tuesday for Yonkers, New 
York, where they will remain several weeks. 

In celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Berres. of 
No. 14S8 West Washington street, entertained with 
a hearts party Monday evening. 

In celebration of the birthday anniversary of their 
daughter, Ruth, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bell, of No. 846 
Hubbard street, entertained with a garden party 
Tuesday evening. 

Mrs. Carrie Craig, who returned recently from a 
two years' sojourn in Europe, her daughter. Mrs. 
William Watson Lovett, just home from an eigh- 



teen month-' \ isit in the East, and Miss lulia Muny 
were special guests at a musicale and tea with which 

Mrs. Willoughby Rodman entertained Tuesday af- 
ternoon. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of Miss 
Nellie McPeak, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
McPeak, of No. 230 West Eighteenth street, to Ar- 
thur Campbell, of North Glendale. 

Miss Florence Sweet, daughter <>f Mr. and Mrs. 
' I . Sweet, was married Tuesday evening to Mr. 
Henry 11. Thornton in Newman Methodist church. 

Mrs. I. aura Stevenson of Los Angeles, who is the 
guest of relatives in San Francisco and Alameda, is 
being much entertained in those northern cities. 

Judge and Mrs. Stephen C. Hubbell have as their 
guests, Mrs. M. F. Lc Roy. Miss Alma Le Roy and 
Mr. Allen Le Roy. of Manchester, la. 

Mrs. W. D. Curtis and children of No. 1933 Ox- 
ford avenue, have returned from an outing at Cor- 
onado Tent City and Stanley Park. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Stoddard, of No. 921 West 
Fourth street, have returned from Alaska where 
they passed the summer vacation. 

Mrs. Lois E. Pelton, of No. 1027^ Grattan street, 
will leave next week for an extended visit in the 
East. 



< 



\V^™ p A£/ 




#: 



So.Broadway *&&!SE£5I&** So. Hill Street 
A. FUSENOT CQ. 

$30,000 Worth of Newly Imported 



Oriental Rugs 



Vs to Vz Off 



REGULAR 
PRICES 



Our great sale is now going on. We have just im- 
ported a finer assortment than ever, and will offer 
them during this sale at prices that will seem al- 
most incredible to well posted buyers. 

DON'T BUY RUGS 

in a hurry, but study them as you would a picture, 
and note the unique color harmony and artistic 



designs. 



LET US HELP YOU 



Select one, and Save You 1-3 to V z during this sale. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



Golden Ag'e of Youth 

I believe the young man of today has a better 
chance to "get ahead" than the young man of twen- 
ty years ago, writes United States Senator F. E. 
Warren of Wyoming in the New York Times. 

Twenty years ago and prior to that time, the 
young man to get on had to overcome a prejudice 
which existed against youth. The employer of that 
period, himself, had been kept in long service in a 
subordinate capacity, and had served a long ap- 
prenticeship before he was intrusted with serious 
responsibilities. In turn he put into practice the 
same methods and would intrust the high places in 
his business only to men of mature age and long 
experience. 

Today conditions have become almost reversed. 
The owner or owners of large concerns look for the 
creative faculties of youth, and for its vigor, energy, 
and hopefulness, in filling responsible places, rather 
than for the conservatism, the habits of routine, and 
the tendency to be satisfied, of the older man. In 
every line of business nowadays may be found very 
young men filling top places requiring the exercise 
of live brain power, while under them are men older 
in years with the limitations in energy and vigor 
and resources which are the inevitable accompani- 
ment of age. 

Young men have a better chance to get ahead 
now than ever before, because the educational in- 
stitutions of the present day are better equipped 
to train them for the practical in life than ever be- 
fore. The earnest graduate of the technical institu- 
tion of today is qualified practically as well as theo- 
retically to take hold of engineering and scientific 
work at an age when the young man of twenty or 
thirty years ago would not have been trusted to do 
more than carry a surveyor's chain in the field or 
act as errand boy in the office. 

While the young man of this day. in my opinion, 
has a better chance to get ahead than his father had 
before him, there are, on the other hand, greater 
temptations besetting his pathway to cause his fail- 
ure." The allurements of the luxurious life of the 
present day beset constantly the young man whose 
education, ability, and energy make him a money 
earner or getter. On every hand are opportunities 
for outgo and the temptation to "live like a million- 
aire" is the undoing of many a young man who 
burns out the fire of youth without reserving 
strength or substance for the days when, without 
capital, he must be relegated to the ranks of the 
has-beens. 

Answering your inquiry, "Has the country ap- 
proached anything like its limit in an industrial 
sense?" I would reply emphatically that it has not. 
The natural resources of such states as Wyoming, 
Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Montana, and the Pacific 
coast states have scarcely been touched. Their ag- 
ricultural possibilities are almost limitless. They 
will open up fields for the enterprise of young men 
for centuries to come. 

* * * 
Theater Hoods 

The coming season will bring out in Paris, and to 
a lesser degree here, the theater hood. Some of the 
new ones are wired and keep them away from the 
face and from ruffling the coiffure. 

Some of these hoods are quite weird, while others 
are locally lovely. They are made up in chiffons 
and in pale shades of silk. Many have little sprays 



of flowers about the face. One in old rose silk has 
a border of faded pink roses about the edges, while 
another in Nattier blue has pink and mauve sweet 
peas. A yellow liberty silk shows both shaded pur- 
ple and white violets, while another in pale green 
has tiny white moss rosebuds. 1A1 mauve silk is fin- 
ished with shaded wistaria, and a pure white chiffon 
cloth hood has pink rosebuds. 

The hoods, like the friar's cowl, are the easiest 
to stow away, as they roll up easily and can be 
placed in the pocket of the theater wrap. Ruffles of 
laces are frilled about the face and the neck. 

Of course these are to be worn only when one is 
going to or returning from the play or other evening 
entertainment. The American woman as a rule 
does not take kindly to these accessories, preferring 
a simple chiffon or lace scarf. 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. 



Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Tabic Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 



We grind all kinds of Cutlery and 
do it well. 



210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 




^^^ Japanese and Oriental 




ART CURIOS 

KIMONOS ANT) EMB'ROI'DERIES 



You make no mistake when buying of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kafyuchi Bros. iwZZL 

533 South Broadway 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



... Manhattan Press Clipping Bureau ... 

503 Cambridge Building, Cor. Fifth Ave. & 33rd St., New York City 
Gives the best service of Press Clippings on any subject 
of interest from all papers and periodicals published 
here and abroad. Our readers gather for you more 
valuable material than you could get ordinarily in a 
lifetime. Our service is the neatest and most thorough- 
ly done. Scrap-books of Clippings are most valuable 
for reference and your library. Send your orier on 
the subjects of interest and receive our up-to-date ser- 
vice. 

TERMS: 

ioo Clippings - $ 5.00 1,000 Clippings - $ 35-00 

250 " - 12.00 5,000 " - 150.00 

500 " - 20.00 10,000 " - 280.00 






Pacific Outlook 



15 




To Maude Adams 
Writtbn b\ DOROTITV Kl ssl i.l. I.l wis VT U 

the mcm'rj I momenis, 

The fragrance from 

.i dream :• 1 1 unspoken, 

The I untold; — 

in of white-winged angels 
■ in the still of the nig 
Like a zephyr that sigheth of sadness, 
Yet singeth ol d delight. 

ly face. Will I ever forget it? 

.vithin thy sad eyes, 
In the wistfulness curving thy lips, 
Like the thought of the loving home-ties— 

That conies to a soldier who's dying 

i in a battle field, still and alone, 
While he tenderly thinks of his mother 

Who's waiting and watching at home. 

But thy smile's like a breath from the ocean, 

I the joyousness in it that 
Doth bring back the fragrance of roses, 
\ 1 1 . 1 laughs away tears from our eyes. 

Like the dreams of a future that's joyous. 

Like a wish that must unspoken be — 
TU thy wonderful face in thy picture 

Looking out in its beautv to me. 



Auditorium Reopening 

The Auditorium reopened merrily this week with 
a new company under the direction of John H. 
Blackwood and one containing several old favorites 
of Los Angeles in the cast, besides some new faces 
which are likely to establish friendly relations with 
assiduous theater-goers. The play produced is by 
George Ade — "The College Widow", a lively 
enough piece to enlist the services and enthusiasm 
of the whole company. It serves as the season's 
curtain raiser, so to speak. As is suitable to an in- 
formal introduction the plot of the comedy was not 
of prodigious importance, but yet of just enough 
consequence and interest to make this first bow of 
the company to the public of pleasant histrionic 
import. 

The College Widow appeared to be a very charm- 
ing and dainty person, coquettishly smiled to vic- 
tory by Miss Florence Oakley. She is destined, let 
us hope, to win other ears in California than those 
of college student and to hear other plaudits besides 
the "Rah. Rah. Tiger." of mimic scholars. Miss 
Beatrice Noyes in the role of Flora presents female 
charm as it appears on the social level of the board- 
ing-house pantry. Even there, arrayed as it may 
be, it has its potency, a fact which .Miss Noyes did 
not fail to make evident. Miss Ray Beveridge and 
.Miss Leslie Preston filled subordinate parts agree- 
ably. 

The heartiest welcome was accorded to Lewis 
Stone, who seems to have secured a firm hold on 
the esteem of play-goers, which is an honorable re- 
ward for the sincerity of his art. In reply to the 
greeting which he received Mr. Stone made a grace- 



ful little speech. It forged a pleasant personal link 
between the audience and the stage, which augurs 
well for the future prosperity of the company. 
I toward Scotl alsi 'Hal receptii hi 

when he tirst appeared -'ii the stage, and in the char- 
acter of ( opernicus ralbol he maintained the high 
standard which has won for him so many friends. 
Other members of the company evidently have 
much ability, which will undoubtedl} show Forth as 
the weeks go by. 

Xext week "The I 'it" will he given. This play 
has been dramatized In (banning Pollock from the 
well-known story of tin- same name by Frank 
Xorris. 



"In the Bishop's Carriage" 

At the Belasco this week an excellent play by 
Marion Michelson has been presented. It has a 
well-developed plot and contains little or no wasted 
dialogue. Each scene had some bearing on the 
trend of the drama. The character-drawing of the 
central figures was good, the only weakness show- 
ing in the minor parts; to wit, those of Obennuller, 
Nellie Ramsey, and her mother, and to a certain ex- 
tent her father, who at least in the hand of Ben 
Graham seemed to lack somewhat of that dignity in 
his cups which presumably the owner of "four 
blocks in Philadelphia" might reasonably be sup- 
posed to possess. However, papa Ramsay was 
cleverly portrayed by Mr. Graham, the new char- 
acter comedian at this house. It is a pity that he 
was obliged to make his debut on the Belasco stage 
in a role requiring tipsy steps and faltering speech. 
His side-play is so good that in farce comedies he 
should prove of first-rate excellence. 

The story of the play turns on the redemption of 
Nance Olden, a practiced thief, by a criminal law- 



The Starr Piano 

A Piano of Quality 

The pronounced success of the Starr Piano is not 
due to any one special feature, but is the result of a 
combination of numberless good points that stamp 
it as a distinctive production in high class piano 
construction. Fine art catalogue in colors mailed 
on application. 

XTbe Starr piano Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Factory Warerooms, 413 West Fifth Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



yer, William Latimer. She and her chum, Tom 
Dorgan, attempt to rob Latimer, who has previous- 
ly befriended them. They are caught by him and 
Dorgan goes to jail for three years, while Nance 
proves her ability as a vaudeville mimic, for the 
first time thus gaining an honest livelihood. Lati- 
mer, the lawyer, proposes marriage, which Nance 
refuses, imagining that she still loves Dorgan, who 
is in prison. He escapes, comes to Nance's room, 
when to her dismay she finds that he fills her with 




Frieda E. Peycke, Pianist 

disgust. He is recaptured and by a last act of 
generosity he makes it possible for Nance to wed 
Latimer. 

That the relations of Nance and Dorgan have in- 
ferentially been entirely platonic and that Latimer, 
astute lawyer that he is, should wish to marry one 
of his reformed criminals, is a little difficult to con- 
ceive. But that is perhaps of small consequence. 

The interest of the play centers in Nance and 
Dorgan. The latter part is admirably done by 
Harry Glazier, who expresses in his movements the 
shrinking which others feel for him, and one can- 
not but wonder at the end of the play where the 
fault lies that such men as Dorgan are, whether in 
our system of life or in the hearts of men. Miss 
Grey as Nance was best in the first act, as light de- 
fiance sits better on her than deep emotion. She has 
a quick and alert touch which is captivating in 
seductive roles. In pathetic scenes she does not 
seem to be sufficiently overwhelmed. She fails to 
be altogether done Up, as we may suppose a woman 
ought to be when she feels bad enough. Her vital- 
ity is too ereat for complete misery, a fact for which 
we may all be glad, however much we may enjoy a 
furtive snivel. Hobart Bosworth played Latimer. 
He seems always to tumble into "good" parts. In 
these he is even a little Sunday-schooly at times and 
one would enjoy seeing him play the brute once in a 
way, if only to relieve the tension. Probably all 
plays have to have a "good" man, but one cannot 
help wishing to see Mr. Bosworth wallop things up 
a bit occasionally. One has a fear that the felicity 



which he offers his various heroines may prove a 
trifle dull to the poor dears after a short essay. All 
of which may be interpreted to mean that "In the 
Bishop's Carriage" is a good play, sincerely under- 
taken and well worth the moderate fee. 

DON. 



Recital at the Gamut Club 

The recital given by Miss. Frieda E. Peycke, 
pianist, at the Gamut Club last Friday evening, 
August 28, "ladies' night," was enjoyed by a very 
select and appreciative audience. ' Miss Peycke is 
a pupil of Walter Perkins, of the Chicago Conserva- 
tory of Music, and the recital was her initial per- 
formance. It is her intention to give recitals at 
various cities on her way back to Chicago, going by 
a northern route taking in San Francisco, Portland 
and Seattle. 

It is somewhat early to criticise owing to her 
want of experience in playing to large audiences, 
but we find ' great accuracy and sureness of touch 
controlled and guided by a tender, sensitive nature 
that is sympathetic, and responsive to the finer 
sentiment of her art. This quality was exquisitely 
expressed and thoroughly understood in her beau- 
tiful accompaniments to Miss Mabelle Clarke's 
singing. All her solos were executed without the 
assistance of her notes, showing that Miss Peycke 
is also blessed with a good memory and great con- 
centration. 

The entertainment opened with a Sonata by 
Grieg, which was well rendered: this was followed 
by three songs: "My Lady's Eyes," "I Wonder 
Why" and "A Streaming Sunbeam" which were 




Miss Maeew.E Clarke, Prima-donna Soprano 

sung by Miss Mabelle Clarke, each being perfectly 
rendered by this marvellous voice, so powerful, 
clear, and silvery in tone. One oi the rare and most 
remarkable things, is her wonderful clear enuncia- 
tion coupled with perfect music, every word clear 
and distinct in any part of the house as well as her 
notes being as clear as a bell. Loud applause was 
given and encores were requested and given by 
both performers, and large numbers of bouquets 
were tendered to both ladies, who by their happy 



Pacific Outlook 



\l 



i>rc- 
ciativc of the 

ne w.irk. "I 'hiim and 

ell. were well ren- 

■ i song," 
"If I ('.'nil. I 1 : \\ ish," "Rivals," "Sinj 

Me With Your 1 yes,' r \\;t~ encored 

jjht out the per- 
fecti h. Three sol - were rendered follow- 

ing ' "Xocturno" by (Iru-i;, "Lorelei" \>y 

• t from Lucia-di-Lammermoor, 
li — Leschetizsky, which was arranged for the 
left hand. This arrangement, very difficult in itself, 
rendered with great precision and surety "i 
h, showin ; mastery with the 

land. 
Without doubt Miss Peycke lias a fine career in 
front of her, the something worth while that rei 
penses for long and studious work that enables 

il, guide and express that which the soul 
hung ive t" others. Miss Mabelle Clarke is 

a pupil of Carl Bronson, fai ous teacher of operatic 
»ing, who has brought out with wonderful re- 
sults some splendid voice-. Both Miss 1'eycke and 
rke received after the entertainment, punch 
being served. 

Rene T. de Ouelin. 



"The Time, the Place and the Girl" 

On Monday, Sept. 14. at the Mason < rpera House, 
the Askin Singer Company will present "The Time, 
the Place and the Girl", whose run of 463 consecu- 
tive performances at the La Salle Theater. Chicago, 
at the Tremont and Colonial Theaters of Boston and 
at Wallack's in New York, will he sufficient guar- 
antee of the correctness of the critics' long-looked- 
for phrase, "a real success". The skill of John E. 
Young as a comedian has never before been por- 
traved to such great advantage as in the character 
of Happy Johnny Hicks, a square young gambler 
with a fund of sound philosophy, which he expresses 
in epigrammatic slang. 

"The Time, the Place and the Girl" is not a musi- 
cal comedy, but a music play. The piece could be 
played without music, but Mr. Howard's pretty 
songs make it doubly attractive. There are a dozen 
musical numbers in the play, but they are all fitting 
and descriptive and never in the way of the plot de- 
velopment. 

John F. Young appears in a unique character role, 
that of a happy, care-free gambler, who makes the 
best of all situations when he finds himself at a 
quarantined sanitarium. Among others in the cast 
are Elizabeth Goodall, Lillian Goldsmith, Mabel 
Melvine. James Rook, E. C. Albertson, and others. 

The greatest song number of the play is "Dixie, 
I Love You", the finale of the second act, while 
others are "Blow the Smoke Away", "I Don't Like 
Your Family". " Thursday's My Jonah Day", "First 
and Only", "The Waning Honeymoon", "It's Lone- 
some Tonight" and "LIncle Sam's Best Girl". 



"The Devil" at the Belasco 

"The Devil" — the devil who appears in our draw- 
ing rooms, in our social and business life, the devil 
who really does something to uphold his own bad 
character — is to be seen at the Belasco next week. 
Of all the interesting productions that this theater 



BUNGALOWS 

On Installments 
Small Payment Down 
Balance Monthly 

We can put you up :i home in almost any part of 
the city- to the Westiakt 

tru-t. Small payment down, balance monthly like 
rent. Come in and talk with us. 

Pioneer Investment and Trust Co. 

J. Haivcy McCarthy, President 
C. C. Patterson. Secretary 

Top Floor Grant Building., Fourth and Broadway 



R 

E 
S 
I 
D 

E 
N 

T 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 



MINES SoFARISH 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
315 S.Hill Street 



properties 



B 

u 

s 

N 

E 

s 
s 



ITtnftetbill Sbtrt Co. 

MaKers of Gentlemen's 
Custom SHirts 

Phone F 6715 414' & South Broadway 




Leading Clothiers (INCJ 

437-439-441-443 South Spring 
Between Fourth and Fifth Streets. , 

HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTER S 

FOR MEN AND BOYS 



Good Things to Eat 



Just a Little Better than Mother 
Ever Made 



Home Canned Fruits 

Put up by J. E. Taylor & Co., Santa Ana, Cal. We sell direct to 

the consumer 
ROBERT 1*1 ■VI>I SO IN. Sole Agent for Los Angela County 

Phone P 1652 715 S. GRAND AVE. 



We Handle [Bargains Only. 



Phone F 1468 



Rentals, Loans, Investments, 
Insurance 

GUY E. AGENBROAD 

Real estate 

902 Security Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



has made this is the most praiseworthy, for before 
the play has hardly settled down in New York, 
where it is playing at two theaters to enormous 
houses, it is given here at popular prices by the lead- 
ing stock company. 

"The Devil", written by a Hungarian named 
Ferenc Molnar, is a problem play far exceeding 
"The Servant in the House", or in fact any of the 
recent productions in that line. The devil appears 
in the play as a polished man of the world, a cynical, 
witty philosopher whose machinations express the 
evil side — man's inner nature. He stirs with mali- 
cious glee the smoldering passions of the humans, 
sows the weeds of jealously and rouses impulses 
of -suspicion and hatred. All things warp at his 
touch- and nothing is strong enough to withstand his 
triumphant progress. So in this play, with that in 
mind, Mr. Molnar creates discord in the home of a 
trusting merchant and his wife. He kills the grow- 
ing love of a young artist for a pure woman and en- 
tices the artist and the merchant's wife back to an 
old passion that they thought thev had outlived. At 
last he stands victorious in the midst -of the havoc 
he has wrought. During all this time he moves 
through the play as an attractive individual with 
polished manners, the most engaging speech, subtle 
wit and amusing insincerities. 

It falls to Mr. Harry Glazier to interpret the devil, 
and those who have lately seen the admirable work 
of that gentleman in a variety of characters will 
appreciate that an almost perfect performance will 
be the result. Richard Vivian will be the inconstant 
lover and Miss Grey will be the misguided wife of 
the merchant. Mr. Graham will be the merchant 
and the other members of the company will be suit- 
ably cast. Entire new scenery will be used for the 
production. 

+ * * 

LITERARY NOTES 



By Perez Field 

Apropos of the approaching International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis at Washington, O. F. Lewis 
contributes to the September Review of Reviews a 
most suggestive resume of the campaign of educa- 
tion and prevention conducted with such vigor dur- 
ing the past five years by the New York Charity 
Organization Society. The article is full of encour- 
agement to other organizations engaged in the cam- 
paign against the "white plague." Modern cura- 
tive methods with tuberculosis are described by Ed- 
win L. Sabin, with special reference to the improved 
sanatoria of Colorado. 



In the September Bookman H. T. Torosyan com- 
plains of the difficulty which foreigners experience 
in learning English, a language he holds to be as 
perplexing to the student as Chinese. He relates his 
idea of how English came into being in the follow- 
ing anecdote. "When a boy I heard a fantastic 
Turkish legend which, to my mind, illustrates the 
actual facts concerning the origin and formation of 
modern English. After creating the first parents 
of each of the races, so the story runs, Allah took a 
large piece of meat, and cutting it into slices, dis- 
tributed them among these people to serve them as 
tongues. But for some reason the Englishman was 
absent while the others received their share. At 
last he came to the presence of his maker and in 
mute humility begged Him to put a tongue into his 



L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE 1908 
MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




("Writing in Sight) 



Some New features 

Gardner Bail-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typebar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St,. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Yosemitc Valley 



OPEN ALL YEAR 

Daily train service. Connects 
with Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe. 



There is no season in Yosemite more delightful 
than the Fall — when clothed in its Autumn hues. 
Roads and trails open to points of htterest. Write 
for folder. 

H. H. Vincient, Genl. Agt., O. W. Lehmer, T. Mgr. 
553 So. Spring St., Los Angeles. Merced, Cal. 




DuBois (8b Davidson 

Furniture Company 

212-214 West, Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

We Quit Business 



k. 



High Grade Furniture 
Rugs, Carpets 
Draperies 
Lace Curtains 



nture 

AT COST 






Pacific Outlook 



19 




Now It's Rawhide, Nevada 

ild maintain Nevada's name tot richn •• and ..hen 

liner named Charley llolman. and produi it — 

to repent tliat Rawhide, in pr growth, is duplicating nps 

mor. cairjp of the world, an 

nf development. The 
Ex- 
press recently an- 

Rawhide Ship- 
ments Increase 

More ore 
shipped out of Raw- 
hide at the pi -i 
time than at any 
period in the his- 
tory of that camp. 
Wednesday two 

tons were shipped 
from the Jordan 
lease of the Queen 
Mascot. Thirty tons 
are en route from 
the Grutt Hill mint. 
The Western Ore 
Purchasing company 
of Hazen is sam- 
pling 300 sacks of 
high grade just re- 
ceived from the 
Czar lease on the 
Regent Mining com- 
pany's property, and 
there are 200 sacks 

more on the dump at the Czar ready for sacking and shipment. The McKinley lease on the same property 
has just shipped 115 sacks. 

The accompanying illustration shows a hoist being installed on the Rawhide King Hill Mining Com- 
pany's Coalition lease. The hoist is the Western type and was shipped from Los Angeles. With the hoist 
in operation the work of opening the mine and getting it in shape for production will be greatly facilitated. 
The shaft which is a little over 130 feet deep is to .be continued to the 300 foot level where a station will 
be cut and a cross cut driven to open the rich vein of ore proved up at a depth of 65 feet. With the present 
plan of, development consummated the King Hill will become one of the steady producers of high grade 
milling ore in Rawhide. 

The accompanying illustration serves to show what the King Hill hasn't done more than what it has 
done. Plenty of ore is at hand. What we want is money to help get it out. If we had the money ourselves 
we wouldn't ask for any. All our money is in this mine and lease, and we are glad of it. 

The public now-a-days is demanding results. The era of the promoter with the red vest and diamond 
solitaire and "mining claim" is passing. The Rawhide King Hill Mining Company is getting results, and 
will continue to get results for every dollar invested with it. 

The property is located on Silver King hill, inside of the city limits of Rawhide, and comprises a part 
of the coalition's purchase, right in the center of the proven district. The company is operating on three 
block's of 300 feet square each, nearly seven acres. There are rich stringers of ore all the way down the shaft, 
and the entire dump of about 200 tons is all millable ore. 

At 65 feet in the cross-cut a seven foot quartz ledge was opened up that gave values of from $12 to 
$1,000 per ton, which will average about $100 per ton. Picked samples run up in the thousands. 

This company also owns claim Mohawk No. 1, of 20 acres, just back of Balloon hill, and adjoining the 
famous Jordan lease which recently sold for $25,000. No work is being done on this claim yet but leasers 
will be put to work on it soon. It is believed to be very rich and will become a big producei. 

This company is officered by experienced mining men, who are on the ground giving their personal 
attention to the supervision of the work now being done. L. W. Klinker, President, J. E. Burney, Vice- 
President, E. C. Klinker, Secretary and Manager, C. J. Klinker, Treasurer and Mine Superintendent. 

Capital stock $1,000,000 divided into 1,000,000 shares, par value $1. 400,000 shares Treasury stock to be 
sold for developing and operating purposes as needed. Only 50,000 shares now on sale at 30 cents a share. 
The company reserves right to advance price without notice. Stock will be issued as orders are received. 
In event of oversubscription of this allotment money will be refunded. The recent rich strike on the Grutt Hill 
Mint adjoins us on the north and is on the same claim. For further information call on or address 

J. E. MEYER, Pacific Savings Bank 

202 Mercantile Place Los Angeles, Cal. 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



mouth. But nothing was left of the meat. So Allah 
was obliged to cut a little piece from the tongues 
of all the others, and joining these pieces, He thus 
fashioned a tongue for the Englishman." 



The Naturalization of the Supernatural, by Frank 
Podmore, is a new book announced by Putnam's 
which was published this week. Podmore is so 
well-known as a leader in the Society for Psychical 
Research that any volume from his hands is bound 
to be of interest. 



The Peacock's Pleasure, by E. V. B., is a series of 
essays dealing chiefly with the garden and wood. 
The author gives the following glimpse into bird 
life : 

Last winter a robin tapped at our dining room 
window and insisted upon being let in. In the 
house it lodged, and made itself at home until the 
April following. Every night the bird roosted in a 
different corner in a different room, upstairs or 
downstairs. Every day, at breakfast and luncheon, 
it hopped onto the table and feasted, helping itself 
largely to butter in the morning and to cake at 
luncheon, etc. The confidence shown by such a 
little thing in trusting itself among a household of 
large human people was indeed touching. In Feb- 
ruary, when the family went South, the robin de- 
scended to the kitchen, living contentedly with the 
servants until wide opened doors and windows pro- 
claimed the spring. 

But the most singular instance that I have known 
of a robin's fearlessness was the kind of military 
instinct which some years ago led a pair to make 
their nest at the back of a target at Aldershot. It 
was in the shooting range of the 4th Battalion of 
the 60th Rifles; and the colonel of the regiment told 
me of it at the time. The little pair paid not the 
least attention to the shots thundering on the target 
just at the back of their nest. The soldiers were 
careful not to meddle with them, and the young 
brood hatched and were brought up in safety. It 
may be hoped that they did not all hatch out stone 
deaf. 



In a new book called "The Gospels of Anarchy", 
Vernon Lee says : 

"The old conception of duty was warped by the 
fearful error of thinking that human nature is bad, 
or, as we moderns would express it, that the in- 
stincts of the individual are hostile to the com- 
munity. * * * The Ibsenian theory is right in 
saying that there are lots of people, a majority even, 
who had much better have had their own way. 

"I confess to a superstition in favor of the secret 
and ironical ways of the universe, and a perhaps 
mean-spirited fear of human prearrangement of all 
things, deeming as I do that our intellect, though 
vast, cannot yet compass the multitudinous unex- 
pected, and that what little intelligence and sym- 
pathy and will we possess are barely sufficient for 
everyday use and every day's unaccountable sur- 
prises." 

New Books at the Public Library 

Aglavaine and Selysette, a drama by Maurice 
Maeterlink, is a translation by Alfred Sutro and has 
an introduction by J. W. Mackail. This play is full 



of charm, having a sinuous poetic quality which is 
not soon forgotten. 

Evolution, the Master-Key, by C. W. Saleeby 
(Harper, 1906), is mainly written in praise of Her- 
bert Spencer and his modes of thought and is an ef- 
fort to bring the Synthetic Philosophy up to date. 
The conclusions seem a little cut and dried, as the 
supernatural is ignored and natural evolution is held 
accountable for all progress in human affairs. The 
book is nevertheless worth reading, even by the 
vainest idealists. 

French Novelists of Today, by Winifred Stephens 
(Lane, 1908), contains eight essays which discuss 
the works of Anatole France, Marcel Prevost, Pierre 
de Coulvain, Bourget, Barres, Bazin, Rod and Loti. 
They make entertaining reading, even if in not 
every case one agrees with the judgment of the 
writer. Each essay is prefaced by a complete list 
of the books of the author under discussion. These 
lists are of great value and come down to the pres- 
ent year. The following lines describe the boyhood 
of Anatole France, who says of himself : "At seven 
years old I 'did not know how to read ; I wore divid- 
ed skirts ; I cried when my nurse wiped my nose, 
and I was devoured by ambition. If I had been able 




Exclusive 
Woman's Halter 
French and JLnglish Models 
Special Creations for the Individual — Approval Solicited 

346 S. Broadway 




Uncolored Teas 

Japan — Ceylon 
English Breakfast 

Few tea drinkers realize that 
all pure teas in their original 
state are "uncolored." THE 
NATURAL COLOR TEA is pure and wholesome. 
It has a better flavor and makes a refreshing bever- 
age as a summer drink. 

Our Teas are all pure — uncolored — and selected 
with great care. Order direct from us by telephone. 
Free delivery. 

E. C. TALBOT & CO. 

529 East Plf tn St. 



J. E. MEYER 

StocKs, Bonds and Investments 

Broker and Dealer in 

HIGH GRADE SECyRITIES 

202 Mercantile Place at Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Fads About a Rotary Gas Engine 

And Why 

YOU SHOULD INVEST 

In the Stock of The Los Angeles Rotary Gas Engine Company 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



Advantages of a Rotary Gas Engine for Automobiles 



It IS air-cooled, absolutely. 

It runs more slowly on high gear than any FOUR 

or SIX. 
It picks up speed faster and more easily on the 

throttle. 
It has practically NO vibration. 
It runs with a silence unknown to the FOUR or 
SIX. 

It makes gear shifting almost unnecessary. 
It has no equal for hill climbing. 



It weighs only one-third as much as the ordinary 

motor. 
It costs only two-thirds as much to build it. 
It does away with reciprocation. 
It has a simple and positive lubrication system. 
It has no fly wheel. 
It has no radiator. 
It has no water pump. 
It has no water piping. 
It has no water jackets on the cylinders. 
It has no cooling fans. 



Why We Recommend that You Become Interested in the Los Angeles 

Rotary Gas Engine Company 

Because this company will manufacture a type of engine for which there is already a world-wide de- 
mand, and owing to the fact that the rotary engine is adapted to so many purposes and the, cost of construc- 
tion as compared with the vertical type of engine is so materially reduced, by reason of the elimination of 
many parts, the profits of the company are bound to be large. 

Because this company has passed the experimental stage, having perfected its engine in every particular, 
and is now ready to place its product on the market, thereby insuring to tihe investor quick returns on his 
investment. 

Because the Los Angeles Rotary Gas Engine Company is a home industry and is managed by local busi- 
ness men of integrity and business ability, which fact insures cautious business methods and honest hand- 
ling of funds. 

Because at the present time there is hardly any other line of industry making as large profits as the 
automobile manufacturers, and although we cannot honestly state how large our profits will be it is fair to 
state that many automobile concerns declared dividends this year ranging from twenty-five to two hundred 
per cent; and what others have done with an article of less merit than ours we at least should equal with 
our superior product. 

The company is capitalized for $1,000,000.00, divided into 100,000 shares of- the par value of $10.00 each. 
We propose to sell the first 2,000 shares at $2.50 a share. We request that you give our proposition most 
careful investigation and that you act quickly if you wish a block of this stock at the low price quoted. 

The officers and directors of the compay are: 

WILLIAM E. BROWN, President. H. P. HITCHCOCK, Secretary. 

JOSEPH R. LOFTUS, Vice-president. M. E. BROWN, 

F. E. WOODLEY, Treasurer. F. WINSTANLEY, 

GEORGE H. LEWIS. 

We invite you to call at our office and inspect the engine now on exhibition. 

THE ACKERLY COMPANY 

Financial Agents 
538 South Broadway 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



I would have gone forth to win immortality on the 
battlefield ; but a horse, a uniform, a regiment, 
enemies, were not for me. Therefore I thought of 
becoming a saint. The profession of saint has fewer 
requirements and wins greater renown than that of 
the soldier." 

*John Thadeus Delane, by A. I. Dasent (2 vols., 
Scribner, 1908), is a biography of a famous editor 
of the London Times, a man who materially influ- 
enced the political trend of the time. The book 
gives a peep into the inside of political machinery. 
It shows the wonderful power which Delane pos- 
sessed, both over ministers and his sovereign queen. 

*Israel in Europe, by G. F. Abbott (Macmillan, 
1907), begins with an interesting study of the dif- 
ference between the Asiatic and the European mind 
which is typified by the Hebrew and the Greek point 
of view. "To the Greek, life was a joyous reality, 
or at the worst an interesting problem ; to the Jew 
a bad dream, or at the best an inscrutable Mys- 
tery. . . . Socrates emptied the cup of death with 
a smile and a jest, where Job would have filled the 
world with curses and bitter lamentation. . . . 
The Jew could not laugh, and would not allow any 
one else to do so. The truth is that the Greek never 
grew old, and the Jew was never young." The au- 
thor gives three causes for the unpopularity of the 
Jew: "Man's intolerance of dissent: the antipathy 
between the European and the Asiatic and the Jew's 
infatuated arrogance. . . . that contempt for all 
men born outside the pale. of the Synagogue. . . . 
It was this provincial spirit that had prevented the 
message of Moses from spreading abroad, as the 
message of Jesus and the message of Mohammed 
spread in after times. . . . Judaism has always 
lacked the magnetic attraction of Christianity and 
Islam." There is an excellent chapter called "Anti- 
Semitism", and at the end of the volume a map 
showing" the comparative density of the Jewish 
population in Europe. 

*Innccent the Great, by C. H. C. Pirie-Gordon 
(Longmans, 1907), is an essay on the life and times 
of this forceful pope who did so much to establish 
the power of the papacy at a critical period of its 
history. The book is well worth reading and, be- 
sides, a map contains many charts valuable to a 
student of the history of the times. 

A History of Slavery in Cuba, 1511 to 1868, by 
Hubert H. S. Aimes (Putnams, 1907), is written 
with a desire to make clear some of the racial and 
social conditions of present-day Cuba as far as they 
are .the result of the practice of negro slavery. 

*The Red Reign, by Kellogg Durland (Century, 
1907), is an account of the travels of the author dur- 
ing one year in Russia. Russia is apparently so vast 
a territory that anything which is said of it is prob- 
ably true. It seems to be a land where the worst of 
our nightmares are lived and endured by the na- 
tives. The universal distrust is illustrated in the 
following story : "Once I was in a theater in Peters- 
burg witnessing a performance of Hamlet. I had 
a seat in one of the galleries. Two peasants pres- 
ently came in and sat near me. They removed their 
great coats and their boots. They made themselves 
comfortable for the evening. But when Hamlet was 
trying the blade of his sword for the duel, one peas- 
ant said to the other : 'Tomorrow morning at five 
o'clock we leave Petersburg to return to our homes. 
Is it not so?' 'Yes,' replied the other. 'Then we 
must get out of this,' added the first, 'for see, they 




Lissner Building 

524 South Spring St. 

Fireproof 

Modern 

Central 



^ Desirable Suites of from 2 to 5 Private 

Offices with Common Reception 

Room 

Single Rooms as Low as $12.50 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



have their sw 

\n.; ti .iti-r. Th 

Nearest the Pole, bj R. E. Peary (Doubleday, 

' expedition of the 
Vrctic club in ll during 

1 in a simple style, a happy mixture of 
adventure and scientific pursi 

A Text-Book of Physiological Chemistry, by t llof 
Hammarsten (Wiley, I'JOS), i> in its fifth edition, 
translated from the sixth German edition, which we 
may consider conclusivi aluebfthe 

The American Battleship, by Thomas Beyer | Lee, 

an ephemeral publication useful for per- 

who like to stuff ilu-ir minds with information 

which the) soon forget with profit to the idea spaces 

in tlieir eranitims. 

*A Cyclopaedia of Works of Architecture in Italy, 
Greece and the Levant, edited by William P. P. 
Longfellow (Scribners, 1903), is well illustrated 
and a valuable book of reference. 

A Little Brother to the Birds, by F. W. Wheldon, 
is the life of St. Francis i f Issisi, written for chil- 
dren. 

The Romance of Savage Life, by Scott Elliot 
(1908), is Sunday magazine stuff bound to suit 
Wl «lder-l< ving readers. 

Franz Grellparzer and the Austrian Drama, by 
Gustav Pollak, (Dodd, Mead, 1907), besides a life 
of the dramatist, contains several extracts from liis 
plays which give a idea of his power and methods. 

The Seven Ages of Washington, 1>\ < Iwen \\ ister 
I Macmillan. 1007). is a pleasant essay. In speaking 
of the fact that Washington remained childless he 
says: "It should not be a matter of regret to us, but 
rather one of relief, that he was childless. The 
spectacle of a great man's children and grandchil- 
dren is so seldom edifying, ami so often mortifying, 
that, on the whole, it is better none of his direct 
blood is among us. and that he stands alone with 
no weeds of posterity clogging around his feet." 

The Land Hero of 1812, by C. C. Hotchkiss (Ap- 
pleton, 1904). is a life of lAndrew Jackson written 
f< >r young folk. 

The Oriental Tale in England in the Eighteenth 
Century, by .A I. P. Conant, is an essay on English 
fiction and its sources in the East. 

The Golden Treasury of Irish Songs, edited by 
Charles Welsh, is the only volume of poetry we 
have to record this week. 

Essays in Municipal Administration, by John A. 
Eairlie (Macmillan. 1908), contains discussions of 
various contemporary city problems such as light- 
ing, railways, etc., of interest to every householder 
who has to pav rates for his light, heat or water. 

''Christian Science, by Lyman P. Powell (Put- 
nams, 1907), is an honest attempt to formulate the 
philosophy and the theology of this powerful mod- 
ern movement in the